DIY - Timing belt - Page 5 - Toyota RAV4 Forums
4.1 D.I.Y. and Modifications Share your RAV4.1 projects and ideas for future mods here!

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #41 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-31-2018, 02:07 AM
Senior Member
Country: demoder's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Thanks: 54
Thanked 160 Times in 104 Posts
I would only buy the cam- and crankshaft seals from an actual Toyota dealer or known reputable Toyota re-seller. I recently saw some counterfeit Denso spark plugs on both Amazon and eBay -- counterfeit parts are a big deal. I was once sold a counterfeit Mercedes fan clutch....by Amazon! (Amazon got sued by MB for re-selling counterfeit parts). As you know, those seals are such a pain to reach that they are the LAST place to cut corners or take chances with low-quality parts.

I have used toyotapartsdeal.com a lot over the years, and they are the real deal, but they take a while to ship. I have also used https://parts.stevinsontoyotawest.com, which is one of my local dealers. Their website is kinda a pain, though -- you have to click on the little tiny "Search" at the top right of the page, and enter in your exact part number. But, they have good prices and reasonable shipping.

The Lisle seal puller is a great tool. Its important not to scratch up those surfaces on the cam- and crankshaft (or else you end up with an oil leak), and that tool helps to prevent that. But, I have also used a regular paint can opener tool (like the $1 ones you'll find at Lowes or Home Depot), and just ground it down a little -- that works as a good seal puller in tight places.

(It is not part of what your belt job includes, but the single best reason to get the Lisle seal puller is the steering rack pinion seal! That one is a BEAR to remove, and its a known issue on 4.1's that causes a pretty big power steering fluid leak. It is so tight in there, and that tool will save you the need to remove the whole rack, if you ever find your 4.1 develops a leak there.)

For the camshaft seal: if you don't want to buy/make/rent a tool to hold the sprocket in place so that you can remove/install the sprocket bolt, you can remove the valve cover and hold the intake cam with a wrench.

There's a cast hexagon spot on the camshaft that you can safely use to hold the cam from turning while you loosen/install that bolt. You need to remove the bolt to be able to remove the sprocket, to get to the seal, but you don't have to remove the cam to remove the seal (although, some people remove the valve cover, then remove the journal that is over that seal to remove the seal -- I don't do this, because I don't like the idea of removing just one camshaft journal, but maybe its okay... I don't know, I just now its not my style).

I made a tool to hold the sprocket, so I don't have to remove the valve cover: my tool is just a metal bar with a hole drilled in it, and then another shorter metal bar hinged in at that hole. At the ends are holes that I run bolts (10.9 strength bolts) though, hold them in place in the holes with nuts behind them, and then I just place those bolts such that they prevent the spokes on the sprocket from turning. I use one hand to hold the tool, and the other to hold a breaker bar to remove the bolt. Then I use a torque wrench to install the bolt. The little tool works well.

Here's the tool, its all its glory, haha:







I also made a tool for removing the harmonic balancer: its just another group of metal bars that I bolted a floor flange to. I had to drill out the inside of the floor flange a little bit to fit my socket, but only because my socket is a thick-walled 6-point impact socket (be sure to use only a 6-point socket that that crankshaft bolt!).

I then drilled holes in the floor flange to align with the holes in the harmonic balancer, which allows me to pass the M8 bolts (10.9 strength) through hole in the flange, and thread them into the threaded holes on the balancer. You can see the picture below that I ground down the perimeter of the floor flange a bit so that it will fit inside the depressed area on the harmonic balancer, and flush up against it so that the bolts can get in well.

The "handle" of that tool then gets placed against a fixed part of the frame (or a stack of wood blocks, whatever works to prevent it from rotating), and I then use a long, 1/2-inch drive extension (20" long, so that it reaches out of the wheel well because I don't have a lift) that's set upon a jackstand, and use a 1/2 drive breaker bar with all my strength to break that bolt free (I don't do the starter method personally, though I know it works, as you said). I can then use this tool setup to torque that bolt down properly, too.

This is my glorious "crankshaft pulley" tool, haha:



(it says "loose" and "tight" because you just move the bar to the other side, depending on whether you're loosening or tightening)

Both of these tools are made from some metal bars I had removed from a filing cabinet that I'd turned into a tool box, but you could use anything of suitable strength, including regular flat steel bars from Home Depot, or even pipe (if you're good at drilling pipe). The extra holes in my tools are just there because they were already drilled in the metal.

There are probably a dozen good ways to do this, so do what works for you!
demoder is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to demoder For This Useful Post:
Elle_Rav4 (10-31-2018), eodgator (12-08-2018)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #42 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-31-2018, 12:05 PM
Senior Member
Country: Elle_Rav4's Flag is: United States
 
Elle_Rav4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Southwest
Posts: 289
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Thanks: 567
Thanked 135 Times in 108 Posts
demoder, great post! I wish I had more of a shop to make tools. Right now, I am garage-less but doing all right trading driveway time with friends and doing some fabricating on my condominium's patio. "Shadetree" is my middle name. I am going to try the Lisle seal puller and the paint can opener as needed to remove the seals. Scotty Kilmer has a technique here at about 1:08 for holding the camshaft sprocket that I think I will try:
. Else I am going to maybe jam the legs of a two-leg puller between the spokes of the camshaft sprocket, and then use a heavy metal bar on the legs as leverage, to free the sprocket's bolt. That's a great harmonic balancer holder you came up with! I like it a lot more than the homemade one I saw on the net that uses a pipe threaded into the center of the flange and then a pipe wrench on the pipe.
Elle_Rav4 is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to Elle_Rav4 For This Useful Post:
eodgator (12-08-2018)
post #43 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-13-2018, 09:12 AM
Senior Member
Country: Elle_Rav4's Flag is: United States
 
Elle_Rav4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Southwest
Posts: 289
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Thanks: 567
Thanked 135 Times in 108 Posts
I installed a new timing belt, water pump (with housing), two oil pump seals, crank and cam seals, new tensioner and idler pulley this past long weekend. Observations and (hard) lessons learned:

-- In advance, make or acquire all the tools demoder suggests. Trying to make do with anything else is not worth it. For holding the crankshaft pulley (a.k.a. harmonic balancer), skip my proposed 2x4 tool and get something all steel, like demoder's tool design. During the job, and with the battery removed, the pulley bolt goes on and comes off enough times that an all-steel crank-holding tool, with two grade 8 bolts 8mm x 1.25 screwing into the harmonic balancer, is best.

-- The right way (I think) to install the camshaft oil seal is the way demoder identifies in another thread: Use a piece of pvc fitting, a large washer, and the camshaft sprocket bolt to put it on. As demoder suggests, see youtube footage starting at 5:45 of
Go super slow. Before finding the latter method, I battled with prying one seal on. I ended up destroying the seal and having to buy another, on the fly, at O'Reilly's.

-- The oil pump cover holding the seal that goes around the oil pump shaft is alloy. The alloy can nick easily when one goes to remove the seal. Take special care with your Lisle (or similar) seal removal tool. I put a gash in the oil pump cover and hustled to a salvage yard to get another, on the fly.

-- Is there a good way to get at the two bolts that are used to adjust the tension on the power steering belt? The upper 14mm bolt is a particular bear.
Elle_Rav4 is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to Elle_Rav4 For This Useful Post:
eodgator (12-08-2018)
 
post #44 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-08-2018, 01:06 PM
Senior Member
Country: demoder's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Thanks: 54
Thanked 160 Times in 104 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elle_Rav4 View Post
-- Is there a good way to get at the two bolts that are used to adjust the tension on the power steering belt? The upper 14mm bolt is a particular bear.
Elle_Rav4 -- I'm very sorry that I missed this post, and I know you have the Rav4 back together now, but to answer your question and maybe help others, I bought this tool for the sole purpose of reaching that one very-hard-to-access bolt on the power steering pump:

https://www.amazon.com/TEKTON-WRN771.../dp/B01F512F7Y

The price varies a lot it -- $30 is a lot, I got it for about $20. Other version of it are available. But I got the Tekton, and I have used it many times since. Notice that it is a 6-point closed-end, not a 12-point: that's important because that bolt is so easy to a round out. The tool is longer than a normal 14mm/12mm, too, which gives you better leverage. And the pivoting head will get on that bolt, but allow you to also fit your hand in a place where you can actually turn it.

Great job on your timing belt -- and thanks for posting the new tips for everyone!
demoder is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to demoder For This Useful Post:
Elle_Rav4 (12-08-2018)
post #45 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-19-2018, 06:10 PM
Junior Member
Country: ballantiner's Flag is: United States
 
ballantiner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Having just done this job, I'm going to throw this out there because I didn't see this anywhere else. When lining-up the crankshaft and camshaft to the timing marks and installing the belt, whenever I would turn the engine to set the tension, the cam would be 1 tooth off. After installing the belt, there seemed to be a just little slack between the cam and the water pump that after being turned would go away but cause the timing to be off. So I marked the cam and the block after lining up with the tick mark and then move it forward 1 tooth, installed the belt and set the tension and lo and behold the everything lined perfectly.
ballantiner is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to ballantiner For This Useful Post:
Elle_Rav4 (12-19-2018)
post #46 of 47 (permalink) Old 02-25-2019, 12:37 PM
Junior Member
Country: alexseiji's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Detroit
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Did my Timing Belt this weekend. Was able to replace the crank seal, oil pump housing seal, oilpump shaft seal, and of course the tensioners and belt. It became extremely blizzardous about half way through the weekend which really slowed things down (couldnt feel my fingers) and wasnt able to knock out the water pump or the camshaft seal but those will be next when it gets warm again. I will say that the trickiest part was that damn engine mount! It took me about an hour of swearing and maneuvering to get it out. It was able to get it out through the top the very first time by some stroke of magic.

Just some advice that I dont think I saw mentioned in this thread, When reinstalling (and removing) the mount, it indeed does make it a lot easier to do it with the power steering pump removed and go from below and the back (like a food I didnt do this when removing) however with reinstallation, I also found that simply placing the engine mount loosely in the general area prior to installing the top timing cover made it much easier regarding space to get it in, rather than figuring out how to do this with the timing cover is already installed.

Next time when I do the water pump I will certainly unbolt the engine mount off the block from below prior to removing the top timing cover. It will give you alot of room to work with this way.

Another tip, I broke several 10mm studs holding the water pump on when tryng to TQ to 7ft/lbs. I had used Black rtv to hold and better seal the oil pump housing to the block, however some may have gotten into the threaded holes for the bolts and had a lubricating effect that kept the bolts from reaching proper TQ. Just keep in mind if it starts to feel strange that the bolts keep turning after seating against oil pump housing, stop! Thankfully the threads are okay since it was the screws going into the iron block but any alloy components or aluminum it will surely strip. The screws really just have to be snug enough to keep the housing against the block. No need to go "a bit further" like I did. lesson learned.

I started doing the water pump housing but stopped after getting about 3/4 of the bolts out (at this point we had winds of up to 60mph (100kmh) and the temps were approaching sub 20f (-7c) temps. The thought of cold coolant flowing over my hands made me stop at the point. +I needed to save my hands for the rest of the reassembly which I had only half a day to do with sunlight.

Also, I didnt have access to a tiny mirror to check the timing hole alignment on the sprocket, and my phone couldn't focus that close to the whole, so instead I used a very tiny allen wrench and stuck it into the hole on the sprocket to feel for the timing alignment notch. Worked like a charm.

Overall the job wasnt so bad at all, had it been 30 degrees warmer I even would say Id have a good time!

2000 Rav4.1
15' Mazda6
04' Mazda RX8
alexseiji is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to alexseiji For This Useful Post:
eodgator (02-25-2019)
post #47 of 47 (permalink) Old 04-22-2019, 02:47 AM
Senior Member
Country: demoder's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Thanks: 54
Thanked 160 Times in 104 Posts
Here is a full, Rav4-specific DIY video for this job -- timing belt, crank and cam seal, water pump, oil pump seal and gasket, tensioner and idler replacement. The Rav4 is a 1998, so everything will be identical for 98 to '00, and very, very similar for pre-'98.

I made the video as a step-by-step, bolt-by-bolt, for both disassembly and re-assembly, so hopefully it helps my fellow DIYer's to complete this job and save a ton of money!


Good luck!
demoder is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to demoder For This Useful Post:
Elle_Rav4 (04-22-2019)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply




Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome