3rd Gen Brake Overhaul - Toyota RAV4 Forums
4.3 Mechanical Intakes, Exhaust, Tune-ups, 4x4 system, Suspension, Brakes, etc.

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
3rd Gen Brake Overhaul

I just finished up a brake overhaul including replacement of rotors and pads on my 3rd Gen RAV4. I find brakes pretty straightforward but photos are always nice to have for review. You will need the correct parts first. I learned that there is some choices for the front brakes. Do not start the job unless you confirm you have the correct parts. Visually check the new parts beside your existing parts before you really tear into the job.

Brake Rotors
There are two USDM front brake rotor sizes:
1)4cyl w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD 25mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44147)


2)4cyl w/ 3rd Row Seat and 6cyl models 296mm rotor OD 28mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44146)


There is only one USDM rear brake rotor size:
1)all 4cyl and 6cyl models 281mm rotor OD 12mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44145)


Brake Pads
Brake pads will have either a Friction Materials Standards Institute (FMSI) D-plate number or some manufacturer's part number that will cross-reference to the actual FMSI O-plate number.

There are two USDM front brake pad sizes:
1)4cyl w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1210 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

2)4cyl w/ 3rd Row Seat and 6cyl models 296mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1211 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

There is only one USDM rear brake pad size:
1)281mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1212 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

You should also have any special procedures and any torque specs handy before starting the work. The field service manual (FSM) is the best place to get the most updated info. I highly recommend reading through the FSM first. The SIR regulations ensure you access to this information. Although you might have to pay for access.

Front Brakes: Same specs were listed for 275mm and 295mm brake sizes.
A)caliper bracket bolts 98 N-m (72 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 34.3 N-m (25 ft-lbf)

Rear Brakes:
A)caliper bracket bolts 88 N-m (65 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 26.5 N-m (20 ft-lbf)

Wheel Lugs:
103.0 N-m (76 ft-lbs)

Remember this is how I performed this work on my RAV4. The FSM is the best place to get these procedures. Duplicate my efforts at your own risk. However all you need is a bit of common sense or at least a friend willing to work for beverage.

Last edited by Jarharms; 01-12-2016 at 10:10 PM. Reason: migrated photos to album
Jarharms is offline  
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Jarharms For This Useful Post:
casper (09-08-2015), Johann (08-06-2015), JuneBug (07-15-2015), Octane (06-09-2015), RAV4nut (10-14-2015), RAV4V6 (06-09-2015), scottyedmonds (10-19-2015), unique44 (04-19-2018)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
I'll start with the fronts first.

Tools you will need and some suggested:
-ramp, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks
-wheel lug wrench and lock key
-14mm and 17mm sockets with ratchet
-"sort-of" thin adjustable wrench (if caliper pins spin)
-torque wrench(es) (25 ft-lbs through 76 ft-lbs)
-wire and nylon brushes
-large C-clamp

Consumables:
-new front rotors for your application
-new front pads for your application
-new pad shims, guides, indicators (if needed) *these are Stainless shims that usually can be reused*
-brake cleaner (forget non-chlorinated, it's junk)
-anti seize
-warm water, dish soap, brush
-clean paper towels (forget red shop rags, they're evil)

I'm using the right hand side (RHS) as my example. Let's get this thing up were we can work on it. I used ramps but you might not need them depending on what your floor jack is like.


Find a solid location to lift with the floor jack. Then place a jack stand in a solid location a bit further back. No sense in taking any chances. Remove any wheel locks with your key, remove remaining wheel lugs with your lug wrench of choice, set the wheel aside. I usually set the wheel under the side rails for additional buffer between the car, me, and the ground. I also tend to use rubber wheel chocks behind the rear tires. Pulling the parking brake is better than none I suppose.


Remove the two (2) caliper mounting bolts Red Circles with a 14mm socket. If the slider pin starts spinning then use an adjustable wrench that fits in there to hold the pin in place.
*It's a bit tighter than the normal wrench thickness.*


Pull the caliper off of the pads and caliper bracket.


Since I'm not opening the fluid lines, I find two cable ties work great to loop around a spring coil and hold the caliper out of the way.


Since the brake pads are pretty worn they can be pulled out prior to removing the caliper bracket. New pads or less-worn pads are thicker which makes getting the outer pad out tricky. In those cases just leave the pads in place and remove along with the caliper bracket.


Remove the two (2) caliper bracket bolts Red Circles with a 17mm socket.


I used some left over 8mmx1.25 bolts in the threaded holes to help dislodge the rotor off of the hub. Not really a fan of beating rotors with mallets but you have to get that off somehow. Careful use of heat and penetrating oils are also helpful.


There we go. I suggest some cleanup work on the hub surfaces with a wire brush.


Red Arrow location should be clean so the new rotor fits in place easily.


Strange I know. New rotors usually have an oil coating that needs to be removed. A quick scrub with a nylon brush in some soapy water works better than anything else I have used.


Then I use some good brake cleaner on the surfaces and wipe with paper towels until they wipe clean.


I like to put a thin coating of anti-seize in this area.


Then slide the new rotor into place and use two wheel lugs to hold things in place.

Last edited by Jarharms; 01-12-2016 at 11:07 PM. Reason: migrated photos to album
Jarharms is offline  
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Jarharms For This Useful Post:
cprince (09-29-2016), isperfection (11-09-2017), RAV4V6 (06-09-2015), Richard Busche (04-01-2017), staplegun (04-03-2016), unique44 (04-19-2018)
post #3 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
Check that the slider pins in the caliper brackets move freely. If not then remove, re-grease, and re-install. Sticky slider pins are the "stupid" parts of floating caliper brakes so it is important to check these.
One of the slider pins will have an extra collar Red Circle to keep track of.
*In this RHS example this pin goes on the RHS so it is DOWN when installed. Don't mix these up.


Clean the caliper bracket in these areas Red Circles where the pads slide. A small wire brush and some brake cleaner work well. Dry fit the new pads into each spot to make sure they fit and slide through fine. If all looks good then apply some brake caliper grease to those same areas.


Clean the friction surfaces of the new pads with brake cleaner and let dry before installing. Then transfer the anti-squeal shims and wear indicators from the old pads onto the new pads.


Apply some brake caliper grease to the sliding areas on the new pads. NONE on the friction surfaces...NONE! Carefully load the new brake pads into the caliper brackets. The Red Circles are the pad wear indicators.
*In this RHS example they go on the LHS so they are UP when installed. Personally I think these wear indicators are useless due to their poor design.*


Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 72 ft-lbs.


I give the pads a squeeze against the rotor surfaces Red Arrows before installing the caliper.


Hold the caliper and cut the cable ties holding it to the coil spring. The caliper sort of sits pretty stable on top there. Use the C-clamp to squeeze the piston back into the caliper. I suggest opening the hood so you can occasionally check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder (BMC) and avoid an overflow. As you squeeze the piston back in the fluid will be displaced and raise the level in the BMC. Going slow and steady is recommended so that the dust seal around the caliper piston is not damaged. Remember to check for fluid overflow! Remove the C-clamp when done. Carefully brush off the piston surfaces with a wire brush to remove any crud.


Position the caliper so the brake line is not twisted up, you'll know when it's not right. Slide the caliper over the pads, line up the two (2) bolts with the slider pins, and install bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 14mm socket and torque wrench to 25 ft-lbs.


Replace the wheel, wheel lugs, and wheel lock. Snug the lugs and lock then use the torque wrench to 76 ft-lbs on them in a star pattern. Do another star pattern then go easy on the lock. Safely lower the car and you're pretty much done.
*oh look I left the lock key in the photo. It started raining so I was rushing, which is never a good way to work.*


Now repeat on the LHS. When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal had very little resistance. It has to take up any extra space left from squeezing the caliper piston(s). Using shorter pumps is better then going full-tilt to the floor pan. I then end up going for a drive to bed the pads to the rotors.

Last edited by Jarharms; 01-23-2016 at 09:27 PM. Reason: migrated photos to album
Jarharms is offline  
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Jarharms For This Useful Post:
RAV4V6 (06-09-2015), Richard Busche (04-01-2017), staplegun (04-03-2016), tomee (12-10-2017), unique44 (04-19-2018)
 
post #4 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
Now onto the rear brakes.

Tools you will need and some suggested:
-floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks
-wheel lug wrench and lock key
-14mm and 17mm sockets with ratchet
-"sort-of" thin adjustable wrench (if caliper pins spin)
-torque wrench(es) (20 ft-lbs through 76 ft-lbs)
-wire and nylon brushes
-large C-clamp
-flat head screwdriver

Consumables:
-new rear rotors
-new rear pads
-new pad shims, guides, indicators (if needed) *these are steel shims that are usually needing replacing*
-brake cleaner (forget non-chlorinated, it's junk)
-anti seize
-warm water, dish soap, brush
-clean paper towels (forget red shop rags, they're evil)


I'm using the right hand side (RHS) as my example. Let's get this thing up were we can work on it.


Find a solid location to lift with the floor jack. Then place a jack stand in a solid location under the lower control arm (LCA). No sense in taking any chances. Remove any wheel locks with your key, remove remaining wheel lugs with your lug wrench of choice, set the wheel aside. I usually set the wheel under the side rails for additional buffer between the car, me, and the ground. I also tend to use rubber wheel chocks behind the front tires. Pulling the parking brake is not going to work in this case since it will make it terrible to get the rear rotors off.


Remove the two (2) caliper mounting bolts Red Circles with a 14mm socket. If the slider pin starts spinning then use an adjustable wrench that fits in there to hold the pin in place.
*It's a bit tighter than the normal wrench thickness.*


Pull the caliper off of the pads and caliper bracket.


Since I'm not opening the fluid lines, the caliper hook nicely to the upper link and holds it out of the way. Huh this is an alloy caliper, light but they get plenty crusty.


Remove the two (2) caliper bracket bolts Red Circles with a 17mm socket.


Rotate parking brake adjuster to bottom (if not already) and carefully pry out the rubber plug. You need to get into there to loosen the parking brake enough to clear the rotor.


A flat head screwdriver works great for this. You're not going to be able to see what you are doing, it will be more by "feel". Moving the toothed wheel downwards will loosen the parking brakes.


I used some left over 8mmx1.25 bolts in the threaded holes to help dislodge the rotor off of the hub. Not really a fan of beating rotors with mallets but you have to get that off somehow. Careful use of heat and penetrating oils are also helpful.
......need to find photo

There we go. I suggest some cleanup work on the hub surfaces with a wire brush. Red Arrow location should be clean so the new rotor fits in place easily.


Strange I know, again with the washing. A quick scrub with a nylon brush in some soapy water, follow up with good brake cleaner on the surfaces, and wipe with paper towels until they wipe clean. Forgot a photo of the brake cleaner but you get the idea.


I like to put a thin coating of anti-seize in this area.


Then slide the new rotor into place and use two wheel lugs to hold things in place while you install the rest of the parts.

Last edited by Jarharms; 06-10-2015 at 11:11 PM.
Jarharms is offline  
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jarharms For This Useful Post:
buckeye1872 (08-09-2015), RAV4V6 (06-09-2015), Richard Busche (04-01-2017), unique44 (04-19-2018)
post #5 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
Shoot I just not noticed I lost the photos of the rear pads, caliper bracket, and pins. The rear pads should be strait forward. There is a black collar on one of the pins similar to the front brakes. Same lower pin position as well. Lubricate in all of the same places as you did the fronts.


Caliper bracket loaded and ready to go.


Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 65 ft-lbs.


I give the pads a squeeze against the rotor surfaces Red Arrows before installing the caliper.


Unhook the caliper from the upper link. The caliper sort of sits pretty unstable on top there but I managed. Use the C-clamp to squeeze the piston back into the caliper. I suggest opening the hood so you can occasionally check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder (BMC) and avoid an overflow. As you squeeze the piston back in the fluid will be displaced and raise the level in the BMC. Going slow and steady is recommended so that the dust seal around the caliper piston is not damaged. Remember to check for fluid overflow! Remove the C-clamp when done. Carefully brush off the piston surfaces with a wire brush to remove any crud. Alloy calipers do get plenty cruddy.


Position the caliper so the brake line is not twisted up, you'll know when it's not right. Slide the caliper over the pads, line up the two (2) bolts with the slider pins, and install bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 14mm socket and torque wrench to 20 ft-lbs.


Replace the wheel, wheel lugs, and wheel lock. Snug the lugs and lock then use the torque wrench to 76 ft-lbs on them in a star pattern. Do another star pattern then go easy on the lock. Safely lower the car and you're pretty much done.


Now repeat on the LHS. When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal had very little resistance. It has to take up any extra space left from squeezing the caliper piston(s). Using shorter pumps is better then going full-tilt to the floor pan. I then end up going for a drive to bed the pads to the rotors and set the parking brake.

Last edited by Jarharms; 06-10-2015 at 11:09 PM.
Jarharms is offline  
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Jarharms For This Useful Post:
buckeye1872 (08-09-2015), cprince (09-29-2016), Johann (08-06-2015), JuneBug (03-06-2016), KSNancy (03-05-2016), RAV4V6 (06-09-2015), Richard Busche (04-01-2017)
post #6 of 55 (permalink) Old 05-01-2015, 09:37 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
reserved bed and bleed

Last edited by Jarharms; 01-12-2016 at 11:11 PM.
Jarharms is offline  
post #7 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-09-2015, 07:32 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 36
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Thanks: 5
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Dude, you're awesome!
Thank you very much!
RAV4V6 is offline  
post #8 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-09-2015, 08:55 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Country: Jarharms's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: DeKalb, IL
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 7 Posts
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAV4V6 View Post
Dude, you're awesome!
Thank you very much!
No problem.
I do need to get back in here to finish posting the bleeding and bedding parts. I drove the RAV4 yesterday to get the new tires installed. The brakes still look good and work fantastic. If I had to re-do I would try the Akebono pads out just to see how they compare to the Advics I used. I am plenty happy with the Advics pads though.
Jarharms is offline  
post #9 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-10-2015, 07:38 PM
avs
Advanced Member
Country: avs's Flag is: United States
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 1,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 103 Post(s)
Thanks: 19
Thanked 77 Times in 66 Posts
3rd Gen Brake Overhaul

One thing I would like to add. After you install the new brake rotor, you're suppose to check for lateral runout using a dial indicator to check to see where the high spots are and index the rotor to the next hole as required. This eliminate pulsating when you apply the brake.
avs is offline  
post #10 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-10-2015, 10:28 PM
Advanced Member
Country: Rickl's Flag is: Canada
 
Rickl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,912
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 209 Post(s)
Thanks: 16
Thanked 276 Times in 235 Posts
Excellent write up. One of the best I have seen. I have a question and a couple of comments/suggestions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarharms View Post
One of the slider pins will have an extra collar Red Circle to keep track of..........
When I last did a brake service, one of the rubber collars was swollen and no longer fit properly on the pin so I left it off. What is the purpose of this collar, and do you think it will cause any problem by being removed?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarharms View Post
Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing.
Many years ago I had removed and reinstalled the bracket on a GM car. A few weeks later, after hearing a rattling sound, I discovered that one of the bracket bolts had fallen out and the caliper was rotating on the single remaining bolt. I picked up a new bolt from the dealer and found that thread locker had already been applied at the factory. Ever since then I have been careful to not use anti-seize, ,but rather use a thread locker on the bracket mounting bolts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarharms View Post
When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal sinks to the floor.
That was also my normal procedure, but after performing a pad replacement on one vehicle, I found my brakes working at only 20% of normal. After rechecking everything I could think of, I had to bring it to the dealer. They discovered the master cylinder needed replacement. It seems that forcing the piston further into the MC than normal damaged it. Since then I have been careful to only push the pedal halfway to the floor several times until it becomes hard again.

Rick L Ontario Canada
2008 Silver RAV4 Limited V6 4WD
Rickl is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Rickl For This Useful Post:
Richard Busche (04-01-2017)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome