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If the design follows true to the other hybrid models, the ventilation from the traction battery will blow back across the 12v battery and out of the car at the rear. The 12v battery is also vented to underneath via a hose. These require a specific type vented battery to replace it with. (you can't have battery fumes in the cabin) So even though its a wimpy little battery its relatively expensive to replace.
So, you need a special battery for this? I did not know this until I tried to have it replaced. Seems like my only option is my Toyota dealer for $300 vented battery, yet other batteries are like $120. My current battery is 6 years old figured it was past its shelf life.

I did not know it required such a specific battery with apparently no real options. Or are there?
 

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So, you need a special battery for this? I did not know this until I tried to have it replaced. Seems like my only option is my Toyota dealer for $300 vented battery, yet other batteries are like $120. My current battery is 6 years old figured it was past its shelf life.

I did not know it required such a specific battery with apparently no real options. Or are there?
There are a couple of manufactures that make compatible models but the savings doesn't seem worth it. There seem to be many reports of people having issues with them.

FWIW when the time comes I'm going to get a dealership one.
 

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So, you need a special battery for this? I did not know this until I tried to have it replaced. Seems like my only option is my Toyota dealer for $300 vented battery, yet other batteries are like $120. My current battery is 6 years old figured it was past its shelf life.

I did not know it required such a specific battery with apparently no real options. Or are there?
  • I don’t know whether it’s the same for other model years, but for the 2017 RAV4 Hybrids Toyota used two different 12V batteries. The Toyota dealer’s parts department guy told me the “group size” number of a new battery has to match the group number of the one that came with the car. If you get the wrong battery, it won’t fit in the hold-down bracket I guess. There is nothing on the sticker inside your driver’s door or in your owner’s manual to indicate which battery your car has. The only way to find out which one your car has is to look at the battery. There’s a label on top of the battery. The group number for my battery is S46B24R. (I don’t know what the other group number is for the 2017 model year. The dealer can tell you.) This is apparently a battery size that has also been used in Prius models for quite a few years, FWIW.
  • In order to see the group size number on your battery, you have to access the battery. To do that, you remove the floor mat in the back of the car, remove the spare tire cover, and remove two plastic pieces that cover the battery compartment. There are several Youtube videos that show how to do that, and I highly recommend watching one of them.
  • Here's my original battery, showing where you can find the Group Size number. If you're in the US, Advance Auto has the battery (a Diehard) that exactly matches the OEM battery, except in one aspect: The Diehard has more CCA, 410 vs. 325. Plus, I paid $90 less for the new battery than I would have paid at the dealer.
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  • I don’t know whether it’s the same for other model years, but for the 2017 RAV4 Hybrids Toyota used two different 12V batteries. The Toyota dealer’s parts department guy told me the “group size” number of a new battery has to match the group number of the one that came with the car. If you get the wrong battery, it won’t fit in the hold-down bracket I guess. There is nothing on the sticker inside your driver’s door or in your owner’s manual to indicate which battery your car has. The only way to find out which one your car has is to look at the battery. There’s a label on top of the battery. The group number for my battery is S46B24R. (I don’t know what the other group number is for the 2017 model year. The dealer can tell you.) This is apparently a battery size that has also been used in Prius models for quite a few years, FWIW.
  • In order to see the group size number on your battery, you have to access the battery. To do that, you remove the floor mat in the back of the car, remove the spare tire cover, and remove two plastic pieces that cover the battery compartment. There are several Youtube videos that show how to do that, and I highly recommend watching one of them.
  • Here's my original battery, showing where you can find the Group Size number. If you're in the US, Advance Auto has the battery (a Diehard) that exactly matches the OEM battery, except in one aspect: The Diehard has more CCA, 410 vs. 325. Plus, I paid $90 less for the new battery than I would have paid at the dealer.
  • View attachment 176183
Check Prius chat but I remember something about Non-OEM 12 volt AGM aux batteries not having the drain tube and/or the voltage sensor connections. Again, just from memory as I have not had to install a 12 volt aux battery in a while.
 

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Check Prius chat but I remember something about Non-OEM 12 volt AGM aux batteries not having the drain tube and/or the voltage sensor connections. Again, just from memory as I have not had to install a 12 volt aux battery in a while.
The battery @Ed Stock references does indeed have the drain tube port on which to attach the elbow/adapter.

The unknown is if the elbow/adapter that came with the oem battery will fit properly into the diehard. If not, easy fix can be found at your local hardware store.

I purchased the S46B24R and will install at some point in the next few months. I will provide info on what I find regards the battery fitment and drain tube access using the current apparatus or if I have to buy a different size.

Amazing to me how hard it is to find details on something as simple as a 12v battery replacement on a gen 4 RAV4 hybrid. No one ever seems to remember any specifics or follows up with any details to help others out.
 

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The battery @Ed Stock references does indeed have the drain tube port on which to attach the elbow/adapter.

The unknown is if the elbow/adapter that came with the oem battery will fit properly into the diehard. If not, easy fix can be found at your local hardware store.

I purchased the S46B24R and will install at some point in the next few months. I will provide info on what I find regards the battery fitment and drain tube access using the current apparatus or if I have to buy a different size.

Amazing to me how hard it is to find details on something as simple as a 12v battery replacement on a gen 4 RAV4 hybrid. No one ever seems to remember any specifics or follows up with any details to help others out.
Now I'm kicking myself for not taking photos of the new battery and the vent hose when I had the battery out of the car. The vent hose "elbow" fitting that plugs into the battery fit perfectly into the port on the Diehard battery. I think - but I can't say for certain - that when you insert it and it seems to "snap" into place that's what opens the vent port. There was no plug in the port that needed to be removed before installing the vent hose, so I think I'm right about this. Since replacing the battery I haven't had any acid smell in the car, and maybe that means it's venting properly.

As for the "voltage sensor connections" Variman mentioned above, I don't think there are any attached to the battery itself. There's some electronic-looking stuff attached to the positive battery cable, and I assume that might be what Variman is referencing. I'll post a photo showing that when I find it on my phone and transfer it to my computer.
 

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Here's a photo of my original battery before I replaced it.
The red arrow points at where the vent hose coupling inserts into the side of the battery below/near the positive battery post.

All that electrical/electronic stuff you see near the positive cable clamp is actually attached to the clamp, not the battery. You have to be careful when removing and re-installing the cable. I have no idea what that stuff does, but I imagine it's expensive to replace if you get careless and break it.
You can see how spotless the battery posts were. It's probably one of the benefits of having a vented battery and having it inside your car rather than exposed to the elements in your engine compartment.
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Good post @Ed Stock Thanks for the info...now I know the vent tube adapter will fit the port on the diehard.

Additionally, your post about the two different batteries the 2017 RAV4 hybrid may house is very beneficial. Why Toyota would do that is perplexing but knowing this is an issue necessitates opening up the rear to look at the group number a particular RAV4 has.

Admittedly I haven't opened up the back yet as I wanted to have the battery on hand when I do... hopefully the S46B24R will fit the bill. I've had the battery for about 6 weeks but procrastinating because of the holidays. I do plan to put it on the smart charger prior to install.

After replacing the 12v in the RAV4, I will add comments as well to assist others.

Thanks again.
 

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If anyone's got a 2016-2018 Rav4 Hybrid and wants to see how to access the 12V battery, here are two videos. I recommend watching either or both of them before you frustrate yourself....


For 2019 and newer:
 
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