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Thanks, I just watched it. Informative, and it looks like a pain. 😫 Regretting not getting the XSE but definitely not going to cancel over it. Hoping they maybe would be able to offer this upgrade later? Of the XSE options, I really only wanted the fake leather seats and the plug in the back. Preferred the SE wheels and lack of bigger sunroof to the XSE so thought I was being smart and saving a few thousand. 🙄
XSE does not have 1500w inverter either. You need PP to get it.
 

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2022 Rav4 Prime SE, 2016 Leaf with upgraded 40kwh battery, 2014 Prius, 1965 F100 Inline 6
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I purchased a 1500w true sine wave inverter and rigged the necessary cables (with a 200A breaker and cut off switch) for my Leaf (has 40kw battery) for home power outages. Not nearly as handy as having it all built in, especially for camping etc. But it works. Tested just today and it powered my refrigerator and modem/router and a few lights for about 8 hours on 10% of my Leaf battery.

Agree that this should be a built in feature for ALL full electric vehicles. Stupid to have a 40-80kw battery pack and not be able to get power out in an emergency. And for a PHEV that might see camping etc, ought to be an add on that does not require XSE with PP.

I think I read somewhere that for 2023, this feature may be separated from the PP and XSE. Might be wrong.....
 

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If I'm understanding correctly in your install, you are supplying power to the 1200W inverter from a 12V 120W outlet. This can't possibly work - what am I missing?
I don't think he did that. He connected inverter to the battery terminals directly with 200 amp fuse.
I am thinking doing exactly that as soon as I find the place to put it. Or I am thinking to find a quick disconnect plug and wire it permanently to the battery and then I need an inverter I will plug it in for temporary use.
 

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I don't think he did that. He connected inverter to the battery terminals directly with 200 amp fuse.
I am thinking doing exactly that as soon as I find the place to put it. Or I am thinking to find a quick disconnect plug and wire it permanently to the battery and then I need an inverter I will plug it in for temporary use.
OK that makes sense, I didn't watch the entire video and missed that part. Do you know if the large 18 KW battery maintains the 12V battery in the car as power is pulled from the 12 battery?
 

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OK that makes sense, I didn't watch the entire video and missed that part. Do you know if the large 18 KW battery maintains the 12V battery in the car as power is pulled from the 12 battery?
The traction battery will only charge the 12 volt battery when the car is in READY mode. In addition, the output of the DC-DC converter is likely under 100 amps (the actual number does not seem to be published). This will result in a net discharge if the inverter is drawing more than the DC-DC converter can provide.
 

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The traction battery will only charge the 12 volt battery when the car is in READY mode. In addition, the output of the DC-DC converter is likely under 100 amps (the actual number does not seem to be published). This will result in a net discharge if the inverter is drawing more than the DC-DC converter can provide.
So what you are saying there is no reason to install more than 1200W inverter?
Watch this video. He says in the end that it might be 150amp but I have not found confirmation yet.
 

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So what you are saying there is no reason to install more than 1200W inverter?
Watch this video. He says in the end that it might be 150amp but I have not found confirmation yet.
If a larger inverter than the DC-DC converter can support is installed, the power in the battery will be drawn down if the inverter load is greater than what the DC-DC converter can supply. This can be done for short periods of time such as using a microwave. If a load greater than the DC-DC converter can handle is used continuously, the battery charge will become low. If the DC-DC converter capacity is indeed 150 amps continuous-rated, then a 1500 watt inverter continuous load could be supported.
 
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