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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I condensed this thread from: https://www.rav4world.com/forums/178-recall/88494-2gr-fev6-lsc90k-recall-oil-line-fails-dealer-won-t-cover-damages-warning.html#post1787874
I'd previously posted my experience in installing the pipe in post 53 and a very interesting disucuuion with the dealer in post 48 here: https://www.rav4world.com/forums/178-recall/88494-2gr-fev6-lsc90k-recall-oil-line-fails-dealer-won-t-cover-damages-warning.html#post1787874

From member RPM originally posted on 04-09-2009:

Well, after a couple of hours and beers later I was able to complete the VVT-i oil line installation. It was more work than I thought but if you take your time it's not too difficult. I used TSB # EG064-05 from the Avalon for part #'s and torque specs.

When you order the oil line be sure to order two 90430–16012 gaskets and one 90430–16016 gasket. These are crush type washers that should only be used once.

I originally had the Rav on ramps for ease of access to the lower banjo fitting however this bolt was extremely tight and I ended up jacking the car and removing the front passenger wheel so I could put longer bar on my ratchet for leverage. Make sure to use your jack stands.

Below is how I removed and installed the oil line. If you are planning on doing this yourself put down cardboard or rags on the floor since there will be a bit of an oil drip.

#1: Remove the timing gear cover bolts (2x 10mm). It's a pretty tight fit but I was able to reach down with a 3/8 drive torque wrench to loosen the bolts then unscrew them the rest of the way by hand.

#2: Remove the VVT-i oil line bracket (1x 10mm) using the same method as above.

#3: Loosen the upper banjo fitting (1x 17mm). Unscrew the bolt by hand and you will see a mesh filter screen at the end of the bolt- don't lose this. Don't worry about dropping the washer gaskets as they will be replaced.



#4: Loosen the lower banjo fitting (1x 17mm). As I mentioned above this was difficult to remove without a long-handled ratchet. You will also need an 6" extension with a short socket to get a good grip. Notice all the oil around the block- oil would drip onto the drive shaft and spray everywhere- talk about undercoating.



#5: New parts next to the old ones



#6: Wipe off all the oil around the banjo sealing faces and bolts

#7: Install the double washer gasket on the bottom of the oil line and feed it from the top of the engine bay. Be sure you don't knock the washer off on the way down as it would be difficult to replace once you're underneath the Rav.

#8: Install and hand-tighten the banjo bolts and bracket bolts to make sure everything lines up. Don't forget to install the mesh filter and new washer gaskets on the upper banjo bolt. Torque the bracket bolt to 7 ft/lbs and both banjo bolts to 48 ft/lbs.

#9: Top off the oil, run the engine, and check for leaks. Replace timing gear cover if no leaks are detected. The TSB notes to replace the oil-soaked cover with a new one- I just used a rag to soak up the oil to reuse it.

#10: New oil line




This is just how I did the install myself so proceed at your own risk. If you're not comfortable with the job don't do it.

Cheers,
RPM
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
These instructions were added by member rancidrancid on 07-30-2016:

Thought I would post my install up in adjunct to the instructions already provided by RPM. Made my install go a lot easier. If you have a box wrench, perfect. If not, go get one. It will make your life easier! I didn't have one and had already started so I made do with what I had.

So here are my steps but please use them in reference to RPM's instructions. Also, this is mean to be a guide and if you are not comfortable with doing it, do not attempt.

Get an old Tupperware container or some container to hold the bolts and for cleaning parts. Helps to keep things in one place so you don't loose it.

Here we go.
1. Turn the wheel to the left (this will give you some room to work with on the lower banjo bolt)

2. Loosen the wheel lugs

3. Jack the car up and use jack stands.

4. Remove wheel lugs and set tire aside.

5. Remove the plastic splash shield. This will give you access to the side bolts of the VVTI line shield. I found it easier to access it from below then to get it from above. There are 3 of those dreaded pop out plastic things. Easy to remove and once off you can just remove the plastic piece. Set that aside once you have it removed.

6. Remove the VVTI line shield (10mm bolts, there are 2 of them). I accessed this from the bottom vs the top. I had use a socket for loosening the bolt closest to the engine. The other bolt I ended up using a wrench to get at. My socket and wrench did not fit in there...another spot where a box wrench would have made life easier. But nonetheless, made do with what I had to get the job done. These aren't that tight on there so they are easy to break free. You may wrestle with the plastic piece to get it out of the engine compartment. I found it easiest to move it so it fell out of the bottom.

7. Place some rags or blue shop towels under the banjo bolts to catch the oil that will spill out. Alternatively, if you have those oil absorbing towels, use those. The lower banjo bolt will release a bit of oil once loosened.

8. Remove the top banjo bolt from the oil line. If you have AC, remove the bolt on the bracket that is holding it. You will be able to fit a larger torque wrench back there if you do. Otherwise, fitting even a regular socket and ratchet in there will be next to impossible. If you have a box wrench, that would help out. Be aware that the bolt is damn tight on there. I ended up using my 1/2" torque wrench to break it free.

9. Remove the VVTI line bracket as per RPM's instructions. It's the middle bolt. Comes off fairly easy and I accessed it from underneath.

10. Clean the banjo bolt and the filter. Don't loose the filter. I cleaned the filter with brake cleaner. I couldn't seen anything in the filter, looked to be free of debris so all good there. I also cleaned up the bolt. Remove the old crush washers. Install ONE of the washers onto the bolt. You'll install the other one once you are ready to install the new line.

11. Loosen the lower banjo bolt. I used an extension socket and my torque wrench to break this free as well. A shorter wrench is quite difficult in that spot as it is already a bit tight. This is the reason why I moved turned the wheel to the left. It allowed a bit more clearance and leeway to get some good leverage. The bolt broke free! And when it did, the oil started flowing, which is why it is important to lay the towels and rags down first. Remove the bolt and clean it up with brake cleaner. Set that aside.

12. Remove the VVTI line, I just moved it off to the side (towards passenger side) and it came out no problem!

13. Clean off the banjo bolt holes by wiping it.

14. Install the new VVTI line as per RPM's instructions but leave the bottom washer until later. I found it easier to install the washer after the top was secured. Put in the bolt and the remaining washer. Hand tighten it but loosely.

15. Go to the bottom banjo bolt and note how the old washer was installed. Install it the same way. The line can be moved a bit to make room for the washer to slide in. Put in the bolt and hand tighten.

16. Reinstall the VVTI line bracket. The black tab is moveable so if it is not in the right spot, you can slide it along or rotate to get it to line up. Hand tighten and then snug up with your socket.

17. Set your torque wrench to 48ft lbs as per RPM's instructions. Tighten to specs.

18. Reinstall the VVTI line cover.

19. Do not reinstall your wheel at this point. Clear your engine bay of your tools.

20. Start your vehicle and run it for a couple of minutes. The line will sorta "burb" as it primes itself with oil. Now at this point, just have a look underneath and at the top to ensure there are no oil leaks. If you don't see any, turn the vehicle off.

21. Reinstall the nut you removed from the AC line anchors.

22. Reinstall the plastic wheel well shield.

23. Put the tires back on and tighten the lugs.

24. Lower the vehicle and torque the lugs to specs.

25. Replace the engine cover.

26. Go for a test drive around the block and then check the banjo bolts for leaks again. If no leaks, you're all good.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
After buying a 2008 Sienna with the same Toyota 3.5L V6 as my 2006 RAV4 and finding it has the same pipe/hose VVT oil line these engines came with (and also the same type used with the recall even if it was done well after 2009) I've decided to replace it with the all steel line used on the 2009-on engines and as I've previously done on my RAV4. This write-up from 2009 is a good one so I'm having it made a sticky so others can easily find it.
Remember you need to buy the pipe for a 2009 or newer 3.5L V6 engine. Part number Dorman 917-023. Available from walmart.com, Amazon etc. You may have to wait for it to be in stock. The Dorman part comes with new washers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
First and second pictures show the all metal pipe; third, the metal top end going into the rubber section:

JuneBug also says, "RAV4s built after April 2008 are not affected," meaning they have the all-metal pipe.

Look over on the passenger side, just to the left of the plastic engine cover. In the first picture you can see the all metal pipe next to the A/C pressure sensor (black plug with blue connectors). The second picture shows the metal pipe in more detail. The last picture shows the original rubber hose. The replacement hose is supposed to have a yellow stripe on it:






 

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Discussion Starter #5
The diagram below shows the pipe and its location but the part numbers are misleading.

The 15771M pipe is 15772-31030 and the 15772E washers (gaskets) are 90430-16012. Optionally a 90430-16016 double washer can be used for the lower pipe end.
or if you can find it the pipe with washers is Dorman 917-023.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Got my parts from the local dealer today. $34+tax. Could've bought them cheaper online but shipping woulda cancelled the savings.

As listed in post 5 the parts are:
The 15772-31030 pipe.
One 90430-16016 double gasket/washer.
Two 90430-16017 gasket/washers substituted/upgraded for the 16012s I asked for.

So they wouldn't insist on me ordering the '06-'08 hosed pipe I used a VIN for a 2009 V6 RAV4 I found for sale on eBay. That made them, their computer and ultimately me happy.
 

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Clever deception on your part. Parts? I would have done the same thing. Hopefully the replacement job won't be too painful!
 

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The diagram below shows the pipe and its location but the part numbers are misleading.

The 15771M pipe is 15772-31030 and the 15772E washers (gaskets) are 90430-16012. Optionally a 90430-16016 double washer can be used for the lower pipe end.
or if you can find it the pipe with washers is Dorman 917-023.

I’ve replaced my washer gasket 15772E cause I noticed it weeping on my 09 but still have the same weeping problem with the new washers... anyone else ever have this issue when replacing these banjo bolt washers?
 

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This is unbelievable. I purchased a 2007 Rav4 sport with 100k miles on it. When purchasing I checked it over. Unfortunately the person was still driving it. I let it sit for 2 days after purchase and fired it up and it sounded like a high speed sewing machine. Using the parts list I tried my Toyota in Ontario Canada. The pipe and gaskets are actually back ordered. They couldn't tell me when they would be in. I was looking at about 125 dollars in parts. I went to Sparks TRD and got them shipped to the border for 50 dollars including the cost of shipping (The Canadian American border is a 40 minute drive with much cheaper gas.) What I found interesting is the actual oil line part number for the rav4 is 15707-31030. It is about 30 dollars more and the exact same part (I assume); they don't have a pic of it on Sparks. Talk about frustration. Looks like I have a job to do in the driveway. Thanks for the great write up. It is much appreciated.
 
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