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Discussion Starter #41
My hitch arrived! Too hot today to do anything, RealFeel temperature (humidity corrected temperature) is supposed to go up to 110F (44C) today.

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Discussion Starter #42 (Edited)
Drove around today and kept an eye on temperatures. I have a BAFX Bluetooth reader.
104 F outside temperature. When car was moving, the intake air temperature wasn't that far from the ambient, but when stopped at the light, the intake temperature soared to almost 115 F! That's a definite problem with the way Toyota decided to suck the "outside" air from the corner of the engine bay. Other car brands have the intake upfront, in the grille.

Also, on the same stop-and-go traffic, transmission temp were going steady up. in 10 min they reached 176 F, I didn't have a longer drive to check...

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Discussion Starter #43
Because those days there is an exceptional heat wave here (RealFeel at 109-110F), I finally did what I was planning to do for a while - a heat shield for the battery. The hot air that gets exhausted by the radiator fan blasts directly in the battery. I know that with the hood closed that air eventually goes out under the car, but I still hated the idea. On my Ford Explorer the battery had a factory plastic shield with air gap, and that battery lasted 7 years. Maybe I am a dufus, but here is what I did:

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Because those days there is an exceptional heat wave here (RealFeel at 109-110F), I finally did what I was planning to do for a while - a heat shield for the battery. The hot air that gets exhausted by the radiator fan blasts directly in the battery. I know that with the hood closed that air eventually goes out under the car, but I still hated the idea. On my Ford Explorer the battery had a factory plastic shield with air gap, and that battery lasted 7 years. Maybe I am a dufus, but here is what I did:

View attachment 154693
Why not? In northern areas we have an option of a battery warmer which is also insulated (previous owner of my last Ranger added this, I scavenged it before selling). My RAV also came with a corrugated plastic shield with a foam liner, which I put around my new battery. Had it not been for the crappy body shop that had my RAV for three weeks in December, I may still have been running my factory battery, as it was 7 years old when they took the truck in, but left the doors open and the light switches on FOR THREE WEEKS! (Sore spot, sorry for caps).

Anyway, your post above made me take a second look in my bay, and I’m going the sheet metal route to shield the battery from the heat blast.

For those of us without the fog lights, I’ve found that removing the driver’s fog light cover and reversing the air intake snorkel (rotating 180 degrees) will place the engine air intake at roughly the opening for the fog light hole. It’s not perfect, and will certainly reduce the depth of standing water one could drive through in an emergency, but certainly would result in lower intake temps (considering it’s about 8-10” from the hot pavement). I may play around with this some in the next few weeks.
 
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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
I may play around with this some in the next few weeks.
I don't get why Toyota routed the intake the way they did. In my other Fords, the intake goes trough a hole in the driver side wheel well. On my wife's Kia Soul, the intake sucks the air straight in trough the front grille. It might be my next mod... after the transmission cooler and hitch.

Here's the Soul. See the intake in the grille and... the factory Kia battery isolator!

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I don't get why Toyota routed the intake the way they did. In my other Fords, the intake goes trough a hole in a driver side wheel well. On my wife's Kia Soul, the itake sucks the air straight in, at highway speeds it even has an over pressure. It might be my next mod...
Our 2017 Golf 1.8T has a nice intake that pulls from the gap between the plastic grill and the leading edge of the hood. Fords often pull from the wheel well (Fox/SN95 Mustang are notable ones) but this “behind the headlight” position is a long-standing thing with Toyota. The 1993-97 Corolla had a similar routing, although its opening faces rearward over the left front wheel. I don’t know how much air the RAV can pull from behind the turn signal!
 
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Discussion Starter #47
The vaccum pulls air from around the engine bay. Like I shown on the previous post, at stoplight with 102F outside, the intake temperature was climbing rapidly to 115F.
Maybe not a major problem in Japan or in Canada, but in Southern VA or lower than that, it's kind of silly.
 

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The vaccum pulls air from around the engine bay. Like I shown on the previous post, at stoplight with 102F outside, the intake temperature was climbing rapidly to 115F.
Maybe not a major problem in Japan or in Canada, but in Southern VA or lower than that, it's kind of silly.
In my little slice of the country, we get humid and stifling summer weather similar to what you’d see (so I hear) in DC. We’ve had a long run of high temps lately hitting 97F and feeling like 104F. So, close enough! We balance that with -15F, and I’ve seen it cold enough here at -40F, although only once. I’m sure a better solution is available.
 
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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
Today I was driving in 102F outdoor temperature and, on my Torque app, I saw the Intake Air Temperature going high, high and at a stoplight it pegged at 177.8F. Got stuck there for a while, even after I started moving... then it dropped back to 104-105F. I didn't think to take a screen shoot.

On the way back I saw some clouds moving in and the outside temperature dropped. However, the transmission didn't... and I was worried that the transmission cooler that I ordered is gonna be too much cooling. Remember, this is a RAV4 with "Towing Package" not towing anything, just two people in the car. In my book everything over 175F on transmission is high. I am glad I put synthetic fluid in (Valvoline MaxLife), but who knows what years of driving with the original WS fluid did.


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I have the Hayden 678 transmission cooler on the Rav4 and I don't towed anything. If anything, the cooler helps extend the life of the tranny fluid between servicing.

I believe towing package came with upgraded radiator and an auxiliary tranny cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
Today it was cloudy enough that I could work outside on my tow kit. I have bought the Toyota OE hitch (for V6) and the Toyota electrical module and harness.

There were so many good threads here about how to, and I didn't have major problems. I was alone so I had to support the heavy hitch on a couple of jack stands... they were almost too short.
I was expecting the wiring to be there, in the car, on the "Towing Package" prep. At least my Ford Explorer had it.
To install the wire was more tedious than anything, I had to demolish all the trims on the right side, from front to back, plus the luggage area! Also I had to take the bolt out from front and rear seat belts! How is that something that is not done in factory?
To plug the connector in the connector under the dash I had to lay on by back, head on brake pedal, with a LED light on my head. I bruised my finger trying to release the original connector (second from the end) to insert my pass-trough end. Eventually I disconnected the first connector and the second was easier to access, more space for my fat fingers.
All in all the OE harness it is a good harness, I didn't have to splice anything, plug and play. Plus the module has automatic short-circuit protection, reset-able from controls (just turn OFF and then back ON that light). I have the 30A total capacity on my "TO" car, so that's good... even if all the lights tend to go towards low power LED's.

I am glad that I bought the OE Toyota hitch. The amount of stiffening that they did to the rear of the car made nervous to try anything else and tow something close to the 3500 lbs.
There are three big bolts on each of the rails (some non-OE have only three+two), connections to the end of the rails on the factory dog bone parts. Also there are lateral connections with plates that go inside across two welded pieces of the car end, keeping them together.

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Hitch part # PT228-42060 for $430 plus $50 shipped from a Toyota dealer out of state.
Wiring harness part # 08921-42900 for another $107.
Labor... maybe line 6 hours.
 

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No question the OEM hitch is sturdier than any aftermarket hitch. I don't see myself ever towing closing to the limit so I saved a bit and went with the Draw-Tite type hitch.

Did you have to drill any extra hole to install the hitch? Where is the pass through hole for the wiring inside the cabin to route to the outside?
 

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Nice job! I especially like (with the factory hitch) how it’s nicely tucked up, much less prominent than the Curt type hitch I have. Will you stick with light towing for utility trailers, or will you look to add a 7-pin in the future?

By the way, if your jack stands are the 3 Ton , they just got recalled from Harbor Freight due to faulty welds. Would be a good idea to check it out on their website.
 
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Discussion Starter #55 (Edited)
I didn't have to drill any holes, mine were taped with round stickers. No rust on threads.
However one of the side stiffeners small bolts didn't really align perfectly with the holes in the car, so I had to drill another hole in that plate. It's not pretty, first I drilled it in the wrong direction.
Also I saw that a part of the hitch was missing the paint, but I was too tired to deal with that. I might spray paint it.

I am planning to get at some point in the future maybe a 2500-3000 lbs trailer. I'll cross that bridge when I will. Maybe a surge-type trailer brake actuator?
 

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I didn't have to drill any holes, mine were taped with round stickers. No rust on threads.
However one of the side stiffeners small bolts didn't really align perfectly with the holes in the car, so I had to drill another hole in that plate. It's not pretty, first I drilled it in the wrong direction.
Also I saw that a part of the hitch was missing the paint, but I was too tired to deal with that. I might spray paint it.

I am planning to get at some point in the future maybe a 2500-3000 lbs trailer. I'll cross that bridge when I will. Maybe a surge-type trailer brake actuator?
Do you have experience with surge brakes? Dr. Dyno does, and has a very unfavourable opinion of them. In a recent thread he detailed the compromises that come along with them. Have a look for surge brakes and you should find it quickly enough. Based on his points, he makes a solid, well-defended point for using an electronic controller.

Remember too that your trailer capacity is based on the trailer’s GVWR which is covered in your GCWR. That 3500 lb rating is based on a trailer with that GVWR.

Anyway, glad to see you got this done. Have a good one!
 
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Discussion Starter #57
Thank you!
I will research a bit more, basically for the electronic controller I need one more wire. Also a constant "hot" is recommended too, but maybe I can keep the position lights on permanently.
This is the Toyota controller OM:

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Discussion Starter #58
Yesterday I did a longer drive on Interstate, with speeds generally around 75-80mph. I kept the Torque open on my phone (dual screen mode with navigation) and I noticed that the transmission temperature slowly rises above the coolant one. Coolant was around 186-190F and transmission was between 6 and 14 degrees higher (192-200F). A lot of inertia (heat soak) in that. It would raise higher in slow to stopped traffic (congestion in some point).
This makes me uncomfortable, I can't wait to add an auxiliary transmission cooler. I already have it, and I just received the AISIN ATF0WS from Rockauto. Right now I have the Valvoline MaxLife in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #59 (Edited)
Today was a beautiful day! Cloudy enough that I could take a day of my vacation and install the auxiliary cooler. I have bought stainless steel bolts, washers and nylon nuts (SS too) from Home Depot, plus a couple of galvanized steel "joiners" (pretty stiff).
Umbrella for extra shade and started by taking the front end out. Gazillion of screws, I have printed the attached pdf for help.
The bolts trough the bumper are 2" long. I have used pink Teflon tape (high temperature) on the barbed threaded adapters (they came with the cooler), to be safe.
I had also bought from Rockauto.com 5 Quarts of AISIN WS fluid. Usual drain takes 4 Qt, I figured an extra 1/2 Qt to fill the radiator.
This is the radiator: Amazon.com: Flashpower 18" Aluminum Finned Transmission Coolers Single Pass: Automotive It has fins outside and inside. I opted for this style because I didn't want to worry of rocks thrown in it.
I pulled out the original hose that was going to the bottom of transmission and brought it back to the left side of the radiator. Then from the right side of the radiator I added a 11/16" Gates transmission hose to the transmission. I reused the OE hose clamps, I like those better than the screw-on type that I had.
Between the brakets and the bumper body I have added some hard rubber pieces, to attenuate any vibrations.
I drilled both the holes in the part of the bumper that is a square tube. There are two tubes, with a small space between them.

A side-note. When I bought the house, my requirement was that the driveway to have slope equal to the car ramps (in reverse direction). This way the car is horizontal when is driven "up on ramps".

Pictures below:

This is the place where I took the original hoses out (looking up in front-driver side). Front of the car is down. The hose that was connected towards the front of the car was coming from the OE cooler (shared with the engine) and teh other side has a stubby hose going to transmission (flowing in to the pan). I took that out and replaced it with my longer Gates transmission hose.
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This is where I turned back the long OE hose that was leaving from the bottom of the radiator to the transmission. Decided not to cut it, even if it was not needed to be that long.
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This is where I connected the transmission stub with my new hose. Used like 2' of it.
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Front look. Hmm, I need some airflow for it, better take care of that...
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This looks like it has better airflow? Not pretty, but is under side.
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Note that I installed the cooler slightly off-center. That's because I didn't want to add too much heat in the driver side of the car, that's where Toyota decided to have the engine air intake. I drill some holes there too, to allow some cooler air to be sucked in.
 

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Nice job! Thanks for including the PDF. I’m going to tackle this once I get far enough on my basement. COVID projects eh?

Hope you have some decent weather soon with which to check the temps against your baseline measurements.
 
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