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I want to install an aftermarket transmission cooler on my Rav4.
Does anyone know which line is the return to the transmission from the so called cooler/warmer that is mounted above the tranny.
If anybody did the install , I would appreciate some help.


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Can't answer your specific question but IMO the flow direction or whether the auxiliary cooler is before or after a factory cooler should make no difference.
 

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Can't answer your specific question but IMO the flow direction or whether the auxiliary cooler is before or after a factory cooler should make no difference.

I don't think that is right. Yes it does make a difference. The wrong way will reheat the trans oil, the right way cools it.
 

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I don't think that is right. Yes it does make a difference. The wrong way will reheat the trans oil ...
Agreed - if you're driving backwards.
 

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Explain your logic..... Just as you basically have a the hotter flow water line coming from the water pump going into the radiator and cooled down from the radiator out back to the cylinder head. You basically have the same going on in the hockey puck. 4 lines in the puck and 4 lines in a radiator application. Water in, water out, trans oil in, trans oil out. Then you have the hot side of the tranny line going into the side or lower radiator for a common radiator car/truck application and is EITHER cooled or heated depending upon if the car was just started or long term running and if the weather in 10 degs of winter or 90 of summer. Here too, you have a choice of what " transmission line" to use on the return line of the hockey puck oil exit just as you would if the RAV4 was using a radiator for cooling or heating the trans fluid. So yes there is a difference where you put the finned trans cooler in the "flow" scheme.

If you are hauling a boat or trailer the time the hot pan fluid is in the dinky puck or even a radiator may not bring down the temp to engine water temp. So doing it in the right order makes sense, just as it does when adding and external cooler with a radiator based trans cooler flow scheme.
 

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Explain your logic..... Just as you basically have a the hotter flow water line coming from the water pump going into the radiator and cooled down from the radiator out back to the cylinder head.
If direction of flow is that important are you saying that if someone switched the radiator in & out hoses it would heat instead of cool the water?
 

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I hooked mine on my 05 after the factory transmission cooler (line flowing into the transmission -aka return line) since that is what my B & M cooler instruction say. You would need to consult the instruction manual for your aftermarket transmission cooler.

Here is a thread I started which may guide you. Also look here which shows where the return and supply line is for a 4.4 (post #10 pictures).
 

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I hooked mine on my 05 after the factory transmission cooler (line flowing into the transmission -aka return line) since that is what my B & M cooler instruction say. You would need to consult the instruction manual for your aftermarket transmission cooler.

Here is a thread I started which may guide you. Also look here which shows where the return and supply line is for a 4.4 (post #10 pictures).

Yes, you 100% correct. That is the way to do it.
 

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If direction of flow is that important are you saying that if someone switched the radiator in & out hoses it would heat instead of cool the water?

That would make no difference as far as the radiator goes, but that is in it's own loop with it's large hoses. When adding a finned trans cooler you now are linking 2 different units in series, not a radiator in a loop. You have to attach the new finned trans cooler that was just purchased on the return line to the transmission AFTER the factory puck in the return line to the transmission.
 

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I will be adding a cooler this summer to my wife's Rav4 when I get my boat, and then I will dump the crap WS and put in some nice Redline D6 ATF that is a Group 4 (PAO) /Group 5 (POE) ATF. To stiffen up the shifts, I will then cocktail in some Redline Racing regular and lightweight to get the viscosity to match the D6 that is speced for using to replace the WS garbage ATF.

I also plan to add an external trans filter, a Magnafine or this one that I will be adding to my Honda Fit next week. Made out of a solid piece of aluminum. This is the best external trans filter I could find anywhere. You can have a fully clogged filter and it will flow 95% to 100% to never starve the trans. I bought the gauge as to monitor when it is getting plugged. It comes with a 22 micron filter, with a crap beta ratio so after a couple of weeks I will change it to a synthetic Donaldson filter with a 17 to 22 micron rating beta 1000.

http://www.dieselsite.com/transmissionfiltration.aspx


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I will be adding a cooler this summer to my wife's Rav4 when I get my boat, and then I will dump the crap WS and put in some nice Redline D6 ATF that is a Group 4 (PAO) /Group 5 (POE) ATF. To stiffen up the shifts, I will then cocktail in some Redline Racing regular and lightweight to get the viscosity to match the D6 that is speced for using to replace the WS garbage ATF.
You're definitely on you own coolaid with that!

I also plan to add an external trans filter, a Magnafine or this one .... You can have a fully clogged filter and it will flow ... 100% to never starve the trans.
Nothing short of a miracle! Wonder who wrote that ad?

I bought the gauge as to monitor when it is getting plugged. It comes with a 22 micron filter, with a crap beta ratio so after a couple of weeks I will change it to a synthetic Donaldson filter with a 17 to 22 micron rating beta 1000.
Where is all the material coming from that's going to potentially clog the system? Does someone add some dirt to the closed system every once in a while? If not there would have to be an internal failure inside the transmission. (Or maybe an issue caused by your fluid cocktail.)

I've had two serious transmission fluid issues on Ford pickups. My '01 F-250 Diesel clogged itself to the point I actually started losing gears and had slipping so bad I had to call a friend to rescue me with my '99 and tow my dyno trailer home. I replaced the clogged transmission pan filter and had the fluid flushed. After it happened again twice and the material was non-magnetic and probably coming from the clutch of the aftermarket torque converter the previous owner had installed, I had it replaced. No issues since.

The second was on an older F-250 gas we bought solely to plow snow at our church. Probably since there was very little air flow thru the transmission cooler due to slow plowing speeds the transmission would over heat and start to slip and puke out fluid. I added the biggest cooler that would fit and was reasonably priced and installed it in series whichever way was easiest - I don't remember. That definitely solved the overheating problem but by that time the transmission had been abused so much by guys driving it until it wouldn't go anymore that it lost all forward gears and we sold it for parts. I'm sure someone replaced the transmission and now has a cool running plow truck.
 

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I think I understand Mainia's logic and reasoning.

If you install the aftermarket cooler AFTER the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be cooled to a temperature that is slightly LOWER than that which is coming from the cooler that is built into the radiator.

If you install the aftermarket cooler BEFORE the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be heated by the coolant in the radiator, and any cooling effect that was caused the the aftermarket cooler is slightly negated.
 

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You're definitely on you own coolaid with that!

Nothing short of a miracle! Wonder who wrote that ad?

Where is all the material coming from that's going to potentially clog the system? Does someone add some dirt to the closed system every once in a while? If not there would have to be an internal failure inside the transmission. (Or maybe an issue caused by your fluid cocktail.)

I've had two serious transmission fluid issues on Ford pickups. My '01 F-250 Diesel clogged itself to the point I actually started losing gears and had slipping so bad I had to call a friend to rescue me with my '99 and tow my dyno trailer home. I replaced the clogged transmission pan filter and had the fluid flushed. After it happened again twice and the material was non-magnetic and probably coming from the clutch of the aftermarket torque converter the previous owner had installed, I had it replaced. No issues since.

The second was on an older F-250 gas we bought solely to plow snow at our church. Probably since there was very little air flow thru the transmission cooler due to slow plowing speeds the transmission would over heat and start to slip and puke out fluid. I added the biggest cooler that would fit and was reasonably priced and installed it in series whichever way was easiest - I don't remember. That definitely solved the overheating problem but by that time the transmission had been abused so much by guys driving it until it wouldn't go anymore that it lost all forward gears and we sold it for parts. I'm sure someone replaced the transmission and now has a cool running plow truck.

Nope, not the cocktail that has nothing to do with it. In fact that reduces particulate count. A nice stiff shift is far easier on clutch wear then a heat making slip shift. Common sense would dictate spend the extra $100 to get a top of the line ATF filter system that has a bypass, where most don't. If I miss keeping an eye on the deferential gauge and clog up the filter you can toast a tranny. With a by-pass it is just another layer of security. Remember I am switching to a lower micron rated Donaldson so I will be catching even finer particulates and that means easier to clogging a "full flow filter" system.


At work, I work with a retired Allison automatic transmission fluid engineer. He helped design Castrol's synthetic ATF and help design the filtration system for the Abrams battle tank that was having trans issues before filtration. Cocktailing with non-slip ATF is a non issue, they do it all the time to adjust large companies to "adjust things" for specific issues. I have talked to him many times on all the "dogma" that is spewed about on Honda and Toyota forms on guys freaking out on using only OEM ATF oil. OEM oil is never as good as a nice premium oil from bouquet oil companies. It's all about money and profit, all they have to do is get you to 100,000 miles, after that they don't care. They look at the life expectancy is 100,000 miles. If you are harder then normal on the unit, problems can arise way before it would with a easy going common user would find as an average.

I am very very hard on my Honda's transmission, I would most likely be fine with just a Magnafine, but I am into filtration as a hobby and passion, so I will go the extra bit for a nice piece of hardware. Hobby's cost money..... This is how I get onto the internet at home.......HA HA

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/96/e6/c4/96e6c4d958e6d67b523cd326b272efe2.jpg


Plus, since both my Honda and Toyota will be using the same cocktail mix of Redline D6. I plan on flipping in the better higher micron filtering a couple times a year in the Toyota to get the lower micron particulates that the Magnafine cant get. I would like to be in a ISO cleanliness rating of 12/13/11 area or below. The Magnafine can't achieve that.

As far a closed system, do we really know it is 100% sealed, or is there a vent somewhere? Doesn't matter either way, filtering the fluid for particulates is the way to go. Plus the filter will pay for itself because I won't have to dump my Redline as often because of accumulating particulate count debris.

My Honda doesn't have a tranny pan, and the inline filter is like a 200 micron filter and most cars/trucks have only 100 micron pan filters. Some people have opened up the filter at 150,000 miles and found nothing in the filter....so basically a rock catcher. Believe it or no, very few Honda dealers/parts dept. know they even have in-line filters. Many people on the Honda and Acura forums have gone to the dealer and had arguments with the service and parts dept about having a AFT filter. They have to actually get them to look at the parts page blow up to prove it to the dealer. This is for most of their cars/trucks. Needless to say, they are not doing filter changes as a whole in most of the dealers. My local Honda parts dept. said there is "no filter" on my car, just a rock catcher screen on the intake tube inside the tranny. I had to make the parts guy look for it in the schematics to prove to him there is one. He was amazed, he has worked there for 8 years.

Even Saturn was smart and has an additional spin-on filter for it's tranny.

https://youtu.be/vEimWgEb65c?t=211


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I think I understand Mainia's logic and reasoning.

If you install the aftermarket cooler AFTER the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be cooled to a temperature that is slightly LOWER than that which is coming from the cooler that is built into the radiator.

If you install the aftermarket cooler BEFORE the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be heated by the coolant in the radiator, and any cooling effect that was caused the the aftermarket cooler is slightly negated.
There is no cooler in the radiator in a Rav4, the factory cooler is the puck we have been talking about.
 

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I think I understand Mainia's logic and reasoning.

If you install the aftermarket cooler AFTER the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be cooled to a temperature that is slightly LOWER than that which is coming from the cooler that is built into the radiator.

If you install the aftermarket cooler BEFORE the cooler that is in the radiator, then the ATF will be heated by the coolant in the radiator, and any cooling effect that was caused the the aftermarket cooler is slightly negated.
Yes that does make sense. I was thinking both were air-to-fluid coolers. And since a the water-to-fluid cooler is likely much more efficient than ANY add-on air-to-fluid one it certainly would dwarf any delta T the add-on one accomplished. That being the case it makes good sense to incorporate a temperature dependent bypass of the water-to-fluid puck so it never heats the fluid in hot weather. If were adding multiple other filters, bypasses and gauges anyway, why not.
 

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Mania, rather than multi-quote your post 14 I'll just make a few short comments. I'm a DOD electrical engineer retired from the Data Acquisition & Recording Department of a USN Lab, so I absolutely love data collection & analysis. I'm still always designing something mechanical or electronic. Of late tho I've started to give consideration to how the next owner of my cars and trucks, and yes my house, will be able to live with my various gizmos they will probably consider overkill.

In your case these mods to your Honda & Toyota do have an overkill flavor to them but suit yourself and have fun. Just be ready to deal with any hiccups they may cause with the service or warranty departments. Or in my case the wife department.
 

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Mania, rather than multi-quote your post 14 I'll just make a few short comments. I'm a DOD electrical engineer retired from the Data Acquisition & Recording Department of a USN Lab, so I absolutely love data collection & analysis. I'm still always designing something mechanical or electronic. Of late tho I've started to give consideration to how the next owner of my cars and trucks, and yes my house, will be able to live with my various gizmos they will probably consider overkill.

In your case these mods to your Honda & Toyota do have an overkill flavor to them but suit yourself and have fun. Just be ready to deal with any hiccups they may cause with the service or warranty departments. Or in my case the wife department.

There are zero issues running Redline on a warranted Toyota, The Magnuson–Moss Act is on the consumers side on running different brand oil use as long as it is equivalent or better during warranty. And with WS, it's not hard to beat the quality there. I figure you have seen the posts of the other guy here that hates WS too, that as long as the oil manufacture approves the use for WS you have a standing. Yes, there "might" be an issue with the filter setup, but it is on their side to prove it caused the problem. We have science on both our sides ....so I could still win if they chose to say no. I have experts I have connections with that are tops in the field as my war chest too I know exactly who to call if they wanted to play hardball. I know they have all the money, so yes they can out leverage me with ease....But they know they have to adhere to the Magnuson–Moss Act too. I am willing to gamble because the fluid is the cause for a lot of issue in these transmissions. OEM oil is crap for most things sold, except specialty products where the engineers/owners/ top principals decided to go with top quality oils from the start. Just a note: Hyundai has used Group4/Group5 ester based ATF in their auto trans since mid 2013. They all should do this. My wife's old Hyundai had nice smooth firm shifts with little slip. It was obvious the engineers in their auto trans dev. did a great job at demanding quality OEM fluid. Som of the best in the industry. But then again the trans are their own design so the engineers "had their name on the design" so guess what they did................. demanded an ester based Group4/Group 5 ATF. Toyota and Honda Group 2/ Group 3 ATF.

As far as next owners.........They wont see it, because I will be pulling them because I can very easily move it on to the next car or truc I buy. Plus at least as far as the next owner of the Rav4.....I would consider them lucky. My Honda is a wash I would say. That car gets driven hard, but is well maintained. It has 55,000 miles and I dumped the crap Z-1 ATF at 20,000 and have had 2) 3 dump and fills each with the last fill of the dump getting a cocktail of both viscosity's of Redline Racing (Type F) non slip. Honda is notorious for adding way too much slip agent in their auto trans that in turn shortens the life of their transmissions. Slip = wear and heat.


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https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=2708887

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