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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks all! think I have most certainly learned the hard way that:
1. having a mechanic look over it first is a MUST
2. getting an extended warranty is a MUST

Correct me if I'm wrong...if you say you are buying an extended warranty, does the dealership do a better job of making sure the car is "good to go" in the first place?
What if you tell them much later, as close to you taking the car for purchase, if you want the extended warranty...will they find a way to keep the car to do a "better" inspection before it leaves them?
(as you can see, I've become a total skeptic now)
Guess you need to "bargain in" the price of the extended warranty with the price paid, not even sure how much extended warranties are.

Unfortunately we were under thye gun to get our son a car and didn't do due diligence....which is completely unlike us. We've learned our lesson. Mother Toyota, here we come!!!

Heffie
 

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I recommend flushing using DOT4 brake fluid. A quart of Castrol DOT4 cost less then $9.00. Lasts a little longer and give a little more firmer of a pedal then DOT3 brake fluid.

Have a good day.
 

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That is what I believe to be the matching gender connector that you see in the background. Yes, I believe that the corroded connector piece should be connected to that and it would have stayed dry. Dummy version??? Don't follow what you mean by this.
As you said this 2016 does not have PreCollision Braking, the wiring harness connector's stationary mate that it should have been plugged into just to keep it dry is a non-functional piece (dummy).

Agree with the other comments. The brake sweep area is indeed very compromised. Whether those rotors can be lathed or should be replaced depends on the actual thickness measured, but they will probably need to go. Do both sides look like this? Must have been operated in pretty salty conditions. I'm hoping his Rhode Island adventures didn't include beach driving. What did you say the mileage was?

I usually don't buy an extended warranty from the vehicle seller. You can usually do much better on the internet. There are some threads on this board about it.
7 year / 100k miles, zero deductible plans can be had for under $1,000.00. 8 year / 125k miles, zero ded is under $1,400.00
 

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As you said this 2016 does not have PreCollision Braking, the wiring harness connector's stationary mate that it should have been plugged into just to keep it dry is a non-functional piece (dummy).

Agree with the other comments. The brake sweep area is indeed very compromised. Whether those rotors can be lathed or should be replaced depends on the actual thickness measured, but they will probably need to go. Do both sides look like this? Must have been operated in pretty salty conditions. I'm hoping his Rhode Island adventures didn't include beach driving. What did you say the mileage was?

I usually don't buy an extended warranty from the vehicle seller. You can usually do much better on the internet. There are some threads on this board about it.
7 year / 100k miles, zero deductible plans can be had for under $1,000.00. 8 year / 125k miles, zero ded is under $1,400.00
Get a 4 corner brake job - replace all the rotors and pads including the emergency brake pads. Do not turn the rotors just to save a few bucks whatever you do, replace them. Make sure the calipers are good too.
 

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Get a 4 corner brake job - replace all the rotors and pads including the emergency brake pads. Do not turn the rotors just to save a few bucks whatever you do, replace them. Make sure the calipers are good too.
I think that's an overkill recommendation for a 2016, especially as we have yet to hear what the actual mileage is or the vehicles whole history. And never have I replaced the parking brake shoes on any rear disk brake vehicle I've ever owned, going all the way back to my 1990 Camry. Only case I could understand would be if you drove a 1000 miles with the hand brake on. Or, as I questioned earlier - possible salt water immersion.

Assuming of course that there is sufficient meat remaining, on-vehicle lathe resurfacing is the way to go for ensuring a perfectly true rotor. Toyota even mentions doing it to brand new rotors. If the hub surface has any uneven rust and they don't fit perfectly flush, you can experience issues even on new parts.

"Toyota recommends using the on-car brake lathe for repairing rotor run-out and thickness variation.
This method improves rotor and hub combined run-out, and is the preferred method when compared to rotor replacement and off-the-car rotor machining."
 
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