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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a 2016 Rav4 XLE hybrid. I'm interested in a detailed explanation on how the headlights function. It appears that I have one bulb which is a projector beam setup through the optics of the headlight housing. I notice the cutoff line when my drl or low beams are on. On high beam I see no cutoff line. How is this done? I'm guessing possibly a solenoid that moves a shutter out of the beam optics for high beam. Anyone know? Thanks in advance.
 

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Yeah, pretty much standard bi-xenon operation, though I cant speak to what exactly they have in there for illumination. But the partial shutter you have explained above is a common mechanism to achieve this.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, pretty much standard bi-xenon operation, though I cant speak to what exactly they have in there for illumination. But the partial shutter you have explained above is a common mechanism to achieve this.

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AFAIK these are halogen bulbs, not bi-xenon which are HID bulbs. How is the high / low beam operation accomplished? Anyone?
 

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AFAIK these are halogen bulbs, not bi-xenon which are HID bulbs. How is the high / low beam operation accomplished? Anyone?
From 2016, XLE headlamps use HIR2/9012 halogen bulbs in projector housing. DRL, Hi/ Low use the same bulb. DRL use lower voltage to prolong bulb life. Hi/Low uses full voltage with solenoid damper to control.
Earlier Gen 4 uses 2 different bulbs (each side) for Hi/Low and DRL. DRL uses Hi bulbs with lower voltage.
 
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Do they really transform down power supply voltage for this purpose ?
Or do you mean lower watt.age ?
Canada



Reduced-voltage high beam DRL on a US/Canada 2002 Lexus RX300


Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 requires DRLs on all new vehicles made or imported after January 1, 1990. Canada's proposed DRL regulation was essentially similar to regulations in place in Scandinavia, with an axial luminous intensity limit of 1,500 cd, but automakers claimed it was too expensive to add a new front lighting device, and would increase warranty costs (by dint of increased bulb replacements) to run the low beams. After a pitched regulatory battle, the standard was rewritten to permit the use of reduced-voltage high beam headlamps producing up to 7,000 axial candela, as well as permitting any light color from white to amber or selective yellow. These changes to the regulation permitted automakers to implement a less costly DRL, such as by connecting the high beam filaments in series to supply each filament with half its rated voltage, or by burning the front turn signals full-time except when they are actually flashing as turn indicators.
United States

Shortly after Canada mandated DRLs, General Motors, interested in reducing the build variations of cars for the North American market, petitioned the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in 1990 to permit (but not require) US vehicles to be equipped with DRLs like those in Canada.[23] NHTSA objected on grounds of the potential for high-intensity DRLs to create problems with glare and turn signal masking, and issued a proposed rule in 1991 that specified a maximum intensity of 2,600 cd.[23] Industry and safety watchdogs reacted to the proposed rule,[23] and eventually the glare objections were set aside and most of the same types of DRLs allowed in Canada were permitted but not required effective with the 1995 model year.[23] General Motors immediately equipped most (and, in following years, all) of its vehicles with DRLs beginning with the Chevrolet Corsica. Saab, Volkswagen, Volvo, Suzuki and Subaru gradually introduced DRLs in the U.S. market beginning in 1995. In recent years, Lexus has installed high-beam or turn signal based DRLs on US models. Some Toyota models come with DRLs as standard or optional equipment, and with a driver-controllable on/off switch. Starting in the 2006 model year, Honda began equipping their U.S. models with DRLs, mostly by reduced-intensity operation of the high beam headlamps.
Public reaction to DRLs, generally neutral to positive in Canada, is decidedly mixed in the U.S. Thousands of complaints regarding glare from DRLs were lodged with the DOT shortly after DRLs were permitted on cars, and there was also concern that headlamp-based DRLs reduce the conspicuity of motorcycles, and that DRLs based on front turn signals introduce ambiguity into the turn signal system.[24] In 1997, in response to these complaints and after measuring actual DRL intensity well above the 7,000 cd limit on vehicles in use, DOT proposed changes to the DRL specification that would have capped axial intensity at 1,500 cd, a level equivalent to the European 1,200 cd and identical to the initially proposed Canadian limit.[23] During the open comment period, a volume of public comments were received by NHTSA in support of lowering the intensity or advocating the complete elimination of DRLs from U.S. roads. Automaker sentiment generally ran along consistent lines, with European automakers experienced at complying with European DRL requirements voicing no objection to the proposal, and North American automakers vociferously repeating the same objections they raised in response to Canada's initial 1,500-cd proposal.[24][25] The NHTSA proposal for DRL intensity reduction was rescinded in 2004,[26] pending agency review and decision on a petition filed in 2001 by General Motors, seeking to have NHTSA mandate DRLs on all U.S. vehicles.[27] The GM petition was denied by NHTSA in 2009, on grounds of severe methodological and analytical flaws in the studies and data provided by GM as evidence for a safety benefit to DRLs.[27] In denying the petition, NHTSA said
(…) the agency remains neutral with respect to a policy regarding the inclusion of DRLs in vehicles (…) we do not find data that provides a definitive safety benefit that justifies Federal regulation (…) manufacturers should continue to make individual decisions regarding DRLs in their vehicles.[27]
Several states on the Eastern seaboard, the Southeast, and Gulf Coast (except Texas) have enforced vehicular laws since the early 1990s that require headlights to be switched on when windshield wipers are in use. This prompted the phasing in of DRLs in the affected states (from Maine to Florida including Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama).[28]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daytime_running_lamp
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From 2016, XLE headlamps use HIR2/9012 halogen bulbs in projector housing. DRL, Hi/ Low use the same bulb. DRL use lower voltage to prolong bulb life. Hi/Low uses full voltage with solenoid damper to control.
Earlier Gen 4 uses 2 different bulbs (each side) for Hi/Low and DRL. DRL uses Hi bulbs with lower voltage.
Thanks Butts
Any idea where this solenoid damper is located, and is it replaceable? I would assume that where it is a mechanical device it is subject to failure.
 

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AFAIK these are halogen bulbs, not bi-xenon which are HID bulbs. How is the high / low beam operation accomplished? Anyone?
Please note the careful wording in my post indicating my uncertainty of what kind of illumination (i.e. bulb/light emitting device) is present. Though the same type of mechanical (solenoid driven) device in bi-xenon headlights can be used with a halogen bulb.

The lower voltage for the DRL's in my 2014 are accomplished by placing both high beam bulbs in series rather than parallel by which supplying only 6V to each bulb.

I assume the "damper" is a physical barrier or half "shutter" SIMILAR to what is used in bi-xenon headlights.

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That's how I understood your post theMOTHY. Hopefully the OP gets it.

Sent From the Edge of the Seventh Galaxy
 
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