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To say crossovers are a huge hit with consumers is an understatement.

They now sell in greater numbers than sedans, and automakers are introducing an endless parade of new crossovers into showrooms. Mazda is a small automaker but knows all too well the importance of this body style. The CX-5 was the brand’s first crossover developed in-house, and has received a huge refresh for 2017. While it was never the best-selling crossover on the market, this new model sets a number of benchmarks for the segment.




<center><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EDlAUpxvP7Y" frameborder="0" width="560" height="315"></iframe></center>

Read more about the 2017 Toyota RAV4 vs 2017 Mazda CX-5 Comparison at AutoGuide.com.
 

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I did research into both of these vehicles prior to purchasing my Rav4. The physical look of the CX-5 is more sporty and enticing to many, including myself. My personal opinion, the overall drive and experience of the CX-5 was better than that of the Rav4. With that said, there are quite a bit of complaints about Mazda build quality and reliability in general, as well as specific to the CX-5. After dealing with issues on a previous vehicle and spending far too much time at the mechanic/dealership, Toyota's reliability was more important to me in the long haul.
 

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Interesting comparative review from AutoGuide. Basically they prefer the Mazda, apart from the RAV4's greater interior cargo space and smoother gearbox. CX-5s are all over the place here, helped by the fact that there is a local Mazda dealer but with the nearest Toyota dealer being at least a two-hour drive. As posted previously, if Mazda does come out with a diesel version of the CX-5 I would give it a thorough examination . . .
 

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Most of the car mags prefer the CX-5 because they are all about the driving experience. The typical small crossover shopper really cares more about practical things like ride, fuel economy, storage space, etc. When we test drove the CX-5, the B-pillar created a huge blind spot for my wife. That was a deal breaker for her. She loves her Rav4 Hybrid.
 

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I still have visions of Mazda Rust Syndrome every time I leave the house. Rotting Mazda3's are everywhere. Is that enough of a deterrent to not consider a new Mazda? Probably not, but it's not inspiring either.
 

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Interesting that Consumer Reports in the August '17 magazine now ranks the new and reportedly much improved Mazda CX-5 as the top small SUV, but did cite a couple of shortcomings such as a difficult to use info system and not well situated HVAC ducts.
 

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I have also seen those reports on questionable reliability of Mazda. Actually my friend who just leased new RAV4 at DSRLeasing told me about them as he was researching both models for quite a while and he chose RAV4 for the "peace of mind".
 

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My friend also picked RAV4 over CX5 because of the bigger reliability of toyota. This friend worked at the car company so he is pretty much knowledgeable about it.
 

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I still have visions of Mazda Rust Syndrome every time I leave the house. Rotting Mazda3's are everywhere. Is that enough of a deterrent to not consider a new Mazda? Probably not, but it's not inspiring either.
I've wondered about that also. In a general sense the vehicles I see on here from Canadian roads appear to be working hard underneath as I go through DIYs and things (frozen bolts, rust, build up). I'm not sure if it has to do with salted roads, the length of cold months or the extremes that the colds reach. I live in the NW and I'm not accustomed to thinking about vehicles through that lens because it's typically just average temperatures with a lot of wet months here and I'm sure those kinds of environments are very tough on vehicles which makes durability a prime concern over details. So in that sense Mazda3s can hold up well.

Back a few years ago I was really into Mazda3s and wanted a used one for daily driving while having some utility. Things like having larger more torque'y engine as well as details such as HID lighting and "sport" modes on the transmission are important to me. I really dislike cars that aren't "right there with me", a balance between snappiness and comfort. When I was comparison shopping the Corolla had none of those things, it was just straight forward and more or less A to B. I eventually went with a used Corolla because of a local auto shop owner here who only works on Japanese and Korean vehicles who told me that the Mazda3s had some really quirky problems that were overly intensive to fix that you simply wouldn't generally see with Honda or Toyota. It reminded me a lot of German automakers who create great solutions to enhance all aspects of a driving experience yet those solutions aren't vetted and break down easily or require long hours and special tools just to fix. His example on the Mazda3 was a resistor that was part of the radiator fan circuitry that helped control the speed of the fan. It was located behind the firewall under the dash and typically burnt out over time and heat, thus the critical radiator speed adjustment wouldn't do its job and the dash had to be taken down to access it for a ~$15 part. Still, it was a great car to drive I thought when I test drove one and to this day the Mazda Miata has been one of the best vehicles I have ever owned.

As per the article I think the Rav4 is a much better looking vehicle with its crisp lines and less luxury interior but the CX-5 isn't bad, it's just kind of overly rounded like a Buick or something to my eye. But I understand why this interior would appeal to people who feel like they're getting a premium feel on the cheap. My personal feeling is that if I wanted luxury I would purchase a luxury vehicle. I prefer more of the Toyota utilitarian experience with some nice touches over white leather and a Jaguar'ish interior copy.

Despite the transmission woes they noted in the video, given the choice I suppose I would however consider a Mazda again because it's a "driver's car" and would satisfy my need for a car that gives me an output when I give it an input. And in either Mazda and Toyota's case I'm just sad that they have removed the V6 and assume people only want gas mileage. I have read that the new generation CR-V almost included Honda's 3.5L as an option to go against the then current Rav4 with the V6 but decided to encourage people to spend more money for it in the Acura version or upgrade to a Pilot. Their main citation like the other brands has been fuel economy. To me if people really want gas mileage as a primary focus they could have purchased an HRV or a CX-3 or equivalent smaller vehicle. I can't count the number of times that I've been really thankful for the 3.5L in my 2012 Rav4. Trudging through mountain snow, going up and down the hills around town, safely passing slow moving vehicles quickly on highways, having a quiet and powerful driving experience without the buzziness or delays. To have this now you are asked to purchase a much heavier land yacht like a Highlander/4Runner/CX-9/Pilot to get a V6, and in those cases the vehicle is much heavier to match. All this for 20-22mpg city with a 2.5L I4 versus 17-19mpg city in a 3.5L V6 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. Most people also want upright Camry's that don't translate the road so I suppose I am in the minority all around :).
 

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Been happy with my 2007 RAV4 but ready to replace it, the CX-5 with a Diesel engine is top candidate along with the '17 RAV4. Lower cost, better mileage, better interior quality, better driving experience, more comfortable second row seating, the CX-5 is an appealing alternative.
 

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Now there is this report about Mazda having developed a gasoline ignition by compression engine without spark plugs apart from their use at certain RPM levels, supposed to increase engine efficiency by quite a lot: Mazda introducing breakthrough 'spark-less' gasoline engine in 2019 | Fox News

My reaction is "maybe" - Mazda have been innovative but successful innovation sometimes has not materialized.
 

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I did research into both of these vehicles prior to purchasing my Rav4. The physical look of the CX-5 is more sporty and enticing to many, including myself. My personal opinion, the overall drive and experience of the CX-5 was better than that of the Rav4. With that said, there are quite a bit of complaints about Mazda build quality and reliability in general, as well as specific to the CX-5. After dealing with issues on a previous vehicle and spending far too much time at the mechanic/dealership, Toyota's reliability was more important to me in the long haul.
Interesting...I just got a new 2017 RAV4 XLE and love it! It is white with a tan on black interior and looks amazing! The aesthetic of the RAV4 IMHO beats every crossover out there! It has a striking profile and is just a cool ride!

I looked at the two other major players..the CX-5 and the CRV and was not impressed with either. The body stylings are just plain boring to me. I've read practically every review and watched practically every You Tube review on these vehicles and yet I still came back to the RAV4. I just think it's one of the best looking and feeling vehicles out there!

I hope everyone agrees!
 

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I've talked with an independent mechanic and several guys at the service department at Mazda about any specific repair issues they've seen with the new generation of Mazdas since they've been out from under the Ford umbrella. They all said the same thing: Other than re-flashing the infotainment system on a few, there are NO widespread problems with the new CX's. I've scoped out the forums... people are satisfied with the newer CX-5 and CX-9. Great car, I'm buying one.
 

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As I've mentioned previously, if Mazda actually produces a diesel CX-5 for the U.S. market I'll have a good look. The promised 40+ mpg highway and combined mpg in the 30s plus 310 ft./lbs. torque is appealing . . . if it all materializes, or even materializes at all.
 

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Because both my wife and I hate the harsh ride of our RAV, we test drove a 2017 CX-5 yesterday. It's remarkably smoother. I would switch to it for sure if it weren't for the limited cargo space. That's really my main complaint. The display seems smaller but workable.
 

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After 2 - 4 - 6 - 8 years ... would be interested to see the used depreciation rates, as the RAv4 & CX-5 age and traded in or sold privately.
- Toyota would beat the Mazda, probably by a significant margin

Our 2008 RAV4 Limited v6 is still worth darn near what we paid for it, 2 years ago.
- can't usually say that about other brands
 
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