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I have a 2020xle toyota Rav4 hybrid. It sits on my driveway right now waiting for tow truck for almost 3 hours. Same problem with others, it didn't start today. It looks like a drained battery...no light, horn sound and of course doesn't start. I hope the tow truck company comes within 30 minutes as promised for the 4th time! I'll call my triple A tow after
Probably easier just to get it jump started at this point. Why tow it?
 

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2020 XSE
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I had my dealer install a battery minder this past Friday. It did the trick. I plugged it in that afternoon and let it do its magic overnight. At 7 am the next day when I unplugged it, the 12 v battery voltage was 13.37 as shown to me by the ANCEL BM300 battery monitor that I installed earlier in the week. Since then I've done short trips in the City and a couple of 1 hour trips on the highway, glancing at my cell phone to watch the BM300's report of the changing voltage on my charging battery as I drive, and I've parked it for long stretches from afternoon until morning. I am pleased that now the 12 v isn't draining so much as it was earlier in the week when the vehicle is turned off. When I turned it off at 11 am this morning the battery was12.68 v. Right now 6.5 hours later at 6:30 pm it has 12.65 volts or 100% charge according to the ANCEL monitor. I am much pleased. Compare that to a couple of days ago before I had the minder installed. On Wed at noon battery voltage was 12.67 as recorded by the BM300. By 9:30 pm while parked all that time, it drained down to 12.43 v (75% charged).

I suspect that a few weeks ago the battery died because I had been driving my RAV4 less over recent months due to health issues. I suspect that after that the battery never returned to full charge, as it had never been charged to 100% on a charger. I suspect the dead battery initiated a parasitic drain due to a circuit not closed and causing voltage drain when the vehicle is turned off and some circuits close down. I suspect from my reading that the power of a more fully charged 12 v is needed to correctly open and close circuits as needed. My guess is that after the battery minder fully charged my 12 v, the battery had all the power it needed to correctly open and close circuits.

I feel I have back the reliable XSE that I love, and I'm really glad. I don't see that I'll be needing to plug in the battery monitor often, probably only when I do a lot of short city trips and not enough longer highway trips and the battery isn't charged up enough. I don't want to do a highway trip for only the sole purpose to charge the battery. I'll have the battery minder for that charging if and when needed. I wonder whether I'll need it though, because my health has returned and I expect to be using my XSE more, which is what I bought it for.

The dealer doesn't know any of this yet. They just think the cause of my battery problem is due to my not driving it enough. I only got to deal with the front desk people. I rarely had opportunity to talk with someone with deep knowledge of how the vehicle works, who I could build a trust and rapport with, who would take me seriously when I asserted my suspicion that the problem was more than my not driving it enough and find and fix the problem. I feel lucky that the battery minder fixed it, so it seems.
 

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2020 RAV4 Hybrid Limited Silver over Black
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I only had the battery failure once since I bought the RAV4 in May, after about 10 days of ownership. I jumped it, took it to the dealer where the Remote Connect TSB was installed. It has always started since, but still with all other experiences here I still wondered about it as being a remote worker now my driving is now only short distances every couple of days.

I installed the BM300 battery monitor yesterday morning on my Limited. Once I got the app installed and it registered it showed my battery charge at 18%! I immediately drove around about 17 miles around my town, and when I parked it yesterday outside around 2pm with the doors locked it was at 82%. This morning at 7pm checked it again..down to 52%. Something is drawing it down, but after only one day of monitoring I really don't have a feel for what is "normal". I do wonder if swapping the battery with one that has more reserve power would be worthwhile.
156202
 

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Just a suggestion, instead of driving with it for only 17miles, try charging it fully with a good charger then try to take readings. I don't think short drives really boost the battery to a true 100% unless you are driving at speed for hours and not stopping. Every time you stop, starting it is a killer, and I do think they also settle after a bit.
 

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2020 RAV4 Hybrid Limited Silver over Black
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Just a suggestion, instead of driving with it for only 17miles, try charging it fully with a good charger then try to take readings. I don't think short drives really boost the battery to a true 100% unless you are driving at speed for hours and not stopping. Every time you stop, starting it is a killer, and I do think they also settle after a bit.
Agreed, wasn't able to do that yesterday as the car is parked outside and it was raining. I do plan on putting it on the trickle charger soon to give a better baseline.

I do disagree about the starting being a killer for us, as we don't have a starter and the vehicle starts with the electric drivetrain before swapping over to the gas engine. It's one of the reasons that Toyota can get away with a smaller battery as the cranking amps are not needed.
 

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Just a suggestion, instead of driving with it for only miles, try charging it fully with a good charger then try to take readings. I don't think short drives really boost the battery to a true 100% unless you are driving at speed for hours and not stopping. Every time you stop, starting it is a killer, and I do think they also settle after a bit.
Each time my battery died it happened after driving the car for like 60 miles. I had the TSB done and the battery still dies. True: it takes an additional 3-4 days, but it still dies. I have 2 cars, my girlfriend lives 60 miles away, I have the other car parked in her garage. I switch driving them every 10 days on average: I drop my Rav4 to her place and I drive the other car. In my humble opinion, we are getting lost in small details here like the usage of dash cams, whether we drive the car for 5 miles vs 100 and the usage of other accessories. A dash cam or any other accessory should not be a problem as long as they are wired to a circuit that prevents it from functioning when the car it's turned off. The battery dies because the car does not shut off all the electrical systems. From a logic point of view: the car communicates continuously with the Toyota server to provide info like the location, mileage, windows and doors open/closed, etc. Toyota needs to provide a software update that will turn off that communication within a certain time frame after the engine is turned off, to prevent the battery drain. Simple as that.
Someone on this forum tried to explain me that it's normal for a battery to die after 2 weeks of not driving the car. I do not agree: I can leave my 2006 Jetta parked for 3 months in the summer and it starts without flinching. So basically I cannot plan going to a vacation for 10 days and leave my Rav4 parked at the airport, because when I'll come back the battery will be dead... That's not normal. Toyota seems to have been in a big rush to launch the car and they did not have enough time to identify and sort out all the potential issues: gas tank, battery drain and all the squeaky noises the dash board panels are making in the winter.
 

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Each time my battery died it happened after driving the car for like 60 miles. I had the TSB done and the battery still dies. True: it takes an additional 3-4 days, but it still dies. I have 2 cars, my girlfriend lives 60 miles away, I have the other car parked in her garage. I switch driving them every 10 days on average: I drop my Rav4 to her place and I drive the other car. In my humble opinion, we are getting lost in small details here like the usage of dash cams, whether we drive the car for 5 miles vs 100 and the usage of other accessories. A dash cam or any other accessory should not be a problem as long as they are wired to a circuit that prevents it from functioning when the car it's turned off. The battery dies because the car does not shut off all the electrical systems. From a logic point of view: the car communicates continuously with the Toyota server to provide info like the location, mileage, windows and doors open/closed, etc. Toyota needs to provide a software update that will turn off that communication within a certain time frame after the engine is turned off, to prevent the battery drain. Simple as that.
Someone on this forum tried to explain me that it's normal for a battery to die after 2 weeks of not driving the car. I do not agree: I can leave my 2006 Jetta parked for 3 months in the summer and it starts without flinching. So basically I cannot plan going to a vacation for 10 days and leave my Rav4 parked at the airport, because when I'll come back the battery will be dead... That's not normal. Toyota seems to have been in a big rush to launch the car and they did not have enough time to identify and sort out all the potential issues: gas tank, battery drain and all the squeaky noises the dash board panels are making in the winter.
I agree that something isn't quite right. I think they use too small a battery to handle these parasitic drains.
I have a 2002 Tundra, that has a big full size battery. I don't use that battery very often and have it connected to a quick release battery tender cable. It has a little led gauge on it, and it shows it in 25% increments. I've left it for 3 months and it will be down to 25% marker and still start up just fine. It isn't good for the battery for sure, so I just try to set a reminder to put it on a NOCO genius 10 charger every month or so and within about 4 hours it's up to 100% and good to go for another round.

Now my other is car is a Prius Prime (PP), that for the last few months has sat around hardly used. I also have it on a similar cable, and it will drain down to the 25% mark also, but it seems to drain to about 12.2v but just stays there. It has an undersized battery like the RAV4. But the car doesn't sit around like the truck, I'll use it at a moments notice and it does start right up, but I'm asking for trouble keeping it that low constantly, so I have another NOCO Genius 5, because the manual says not to use too high a charging rate, and I picked it up rather cheap. Just plug it in for a day or two once a month, and it'll be fine. (the lease on a Bolt is coming up, and at that point it will be the primary driver for us for the next several months)
 

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NC '19 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package
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I agree that something isn't quite right. I think they use too small a battery to handle these parasitic drains.
I have a 2002 Tundra, that has a big full size battery. I don't use that battery very often and have it connected to a quick release battery tender cable. It has a little led gauge on it, and it shows it in 25% increments. I've left it for 3 months and it will be down to 25% marker and still start up just fine. It isn't good for the battery for sure, so I just try to set a reminder to put it on a NOCO genius 10 charger every month or so and within about 4 hours it's up to 100% and good to go for another round.

Now my other is car is a Prius Prime (PP), that for the last few months has sat around hardly used. I also have it on a similar cable, and it will drain down to the 25% mark also, but it seems to drain to about 12.2v but just stays there. It has an undersized battery like the RAV4. But the car doesn't sit around like the truck, I'll use it at a moments notice and it does start right up, but I'm asking for trouble keeping it that low constantly, so I have another NOCO Genius 5, because the manual says not to use too high a charging rate, and I picked it up rather cheap. Just plug it in for a day or two once a month, and it'll be fine. (the lease on a Bolt is coming up, and at that point it will be the primary driver for us for the next several months)
If you are maintaining a battery, you should be able to leave the battery on the maintainer for months at a time. They have logic which says "are you fully charged or almost? ok I'll check back in a couple of hours".

All maintainers aren't quick chargers, though some larger units do combine the two functions. And some maintainers will only charge the battery if it it at a sufficient charge already. I had a Porsche with an AGM battery and I'd connect the maintainer when I put the car in hibernation for the winter and disconnect it when it was warm enough to put the top down. Months at a time. No battery damage. Started right up.

I have a 2019 Rav4h. My son has been using it as a census enumerator, going house to house (did you know not registering with the every ten year census can cost your state ~$1,800). Very short runs between stops, many each day, days at a time. It hasn't gone more than 8 miles before stopping in months. A/C on full and radio on always. This for days at a time. Mileage sucks as the ICE has to always run to charge the hybrid battery which then charges the 12v. But no battery or starting issues.

It is definitely some 2020 change.
 

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If you are maintaining a battery, you should be able to leave the battery on the maintainer for months at a time. They have logic which says "are you fully charged or almost? ok I'll check back in a couple of hours".

All maintainers aren't quick chargers, though some larger units do combine the two functions. And some maintainers will only charge the battery if it it at a sufficient charge already. I had a Porsche with an AGM battery and I'd connect the maintainer when I put the car in hibernation for the winter and disconnect it when it was warm enough to put the top down. Months at a time. No battery damage. Started right up.

I have a 2019 Rav4h. My son has been using it as a census enumerator, going house to house (did you know not registering with the every ten year census can cost your state ~$1,800). Very short runs between stops, many each day, days at a time. It hasn't gone more than 8 miles before stopping in months. A/C on full and radio on always. This for days at a time. Mileage sucks as the ICE has to always run to charge the hybrid battery which then charges the 12v. But no battery or starting issues.

It is definitely some 2020 change.
oh believe me, i have two Harley's, they are always connected to Battery Tenders (i've gotten away from that brand, but you get the point.) When I'm not riding them. Just a habit, since I don't always know when I'll be riding again, and want to make sure those little tiny expensive batteries don't die a quick death.

The reason my truck for instance isn't connected all the time, is where it's located. I just can't leave it connected all the time where it sits. Too many toys and not enough space. I'll just leave it at that.
 

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oh believe me, i have two Harley's, they are always connected to Battery Tenders (i've gotten away from that brand, but you get the point.) When I'm not riding them. Just a habit, since I don't always know when I'll be riding again, and want to make sure those little tiny expensive batteries don't die a quick death.

The reason my truck for instance isn't connected all the time, is where it's located. I just can't leave it connected all the time where it sits. Too many toys and not enough space. I'll just leave it at that.

Mine was on a 100 foot extension cord sitting outside under a Noah fabric cover.

And if you think those batteries for your Harley's are expensive, one of the higher end Porsche's replacement 12v batteries costs north of $3,600.
 

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Each time my battery died it happened after driving the car for like 60 miles. I had the TSB done and the battery still dies. True: it takes an additional 3-4 days, but it still dies. I have 2 cars, my girlfriend lives 60 miles away, I have the other car parked in her garage. I switch driving them every 10 days on average: I drop my Rav4 to her place and I drive the other car. In my humble opinion, we are getting lost in small details here like the usage of dash cams, whether we drive the car for 5 miles vs 100 and the usage of other accessories. A dash cam or any other accessory should not be a problem as long as they are wired to a circuit that prevents it from functioning when the car it's turned off. The battery dies because the car does not shut off all the electrical systems. From a logic point of view: the car communicates continuously with the Toyota server to provide info like the location, mileage, windows and doors open/closed, etc. Toyota needs to provide a software update that will turn off that communication within a certain time frame after the engine is turned off, to prevent the battery drain. Simple as that.
Someone on this forum tried to explain me that it's normal for a battery to die after 2 weeks of not driving the car. I do not agree: I can leave my 2006 Jetta parked for 3 months in the summer and it starts without flinching. So basically I cannot plan going to a vacation for 10 days and leave my Rav4 parked at the airport, because when I'll come back the battery will be dead... That's not normal. Toyota seems to have been in a big rush to launch the car and they did not have enough time to identify and sort out all the potential issues: gas tank, battery drain and all the squeaky noises the dash board panels are making in the winter.
Folks - please do not let anyone tell you that it's normal for a battery to go dead after several days or even a few weeks. We have a '14 Acura TL with the original battery. Left it for 5 weeks and it started right up. It does have a key fob, so the car is always sniffing for that wireless signal. It surely has fewer electronics than a 2020 model, but a battery should never drain as quickly as what has been reported here. Toyota has a real issue here and it looks like the TSB that folks have been discussing may not be the final fix. Push on your dealers, push back on Toyota, open cases, etc. Escalate and escalate. It's a shame that Toyota's quality reputation is taking a hit on this. I had my 2003 Highlander for 140K miles and NOTHING was changed except service items. No repairs whatever. That was Toyota's reputation. Sad,
 

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Potential buyer here... read most of this forum and I’m considering going from hybrid to gas which is a bummer. Any chance recent builds are less likely to have this issue? Fuel tank issue does not bother me as much.
 

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Toyota will fix the battery drain... It's just of question of how fast. They cannot afford their reputation to be damaged. I would not let this thing be a deal breaker and buy a gasser instead. Hybrids are more fun, I have an XSE. I had the car at the dealer for the lower control arms recall and they gave me a rav4 gas loaner. I was not that impressed with the performance. There was nothing wrong with it per se, I am probably used to the way a hybrid drives.
 

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What is different from 2029 to 2020 ?

We have never had any battery drain with our 2019 hybrid.

Only difference is the 2020 has android auto
 

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Thanks for the response. Yeah that’s a good point. I’m certainly in favor of the improved performance, just do not like the idea of a new car dying in our parking garage where it may be idle for more than a few days at a time and would be difficult to tow from.
 

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Thanks for the response. Yeah that’s a good point. I’m certainly in favor of the improved performance, just do not like the idea of a new car dying in our parking garage where it may be idle for more than a few days at a time and would be difficult to tow from.
Until they'll come up with an fix, you will have to drive it for a few minutes once every few days. Mine used to die if not driven for 3 days. I have the DCM TSB done at the dealer and now it takes 10 days for the battery to drain. Not so bad. I'm pretty sure that it's a software issue : the car continuously communicates with the Toyota server.
 

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For whatever reason, not every 2020 Rav4 Hybrid has these issues. I have a Limited, 3/20 build, that I got in 4/20. I have driven it 3,000 miles and so far I do not have either the fuel tank or battery drain issue. It is not driven every day and has sat in my garage for several days at a time, and has always started. It's a great vehicle. I'm sure Toyota will resolve the issues. These systems are very complex and sometimes it takes the engineers awhile to determine the problems and develop a fix. Toyota Rav4 is one of the best selling vehicles, and I'm sure Toyota does not want to surrender that top spot to one of its competitors.
 

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Interestingly enough, I learned Orkin replaces every battery in its entire fleet wide Toyota before they take possession. It’s third party outfitter does it and Orkin just stores the original battery for a few years then recycles.
 

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I bought 2020 XLE FWD on June 25th. On August 8th I had to jump start it. Took it to the dealership, and they tested the battery - which tested normal - and they sent me on my way. 3 weeks later, I attempted to start my car after it sitting for 36 hours and it didn't even attempt to turn over - not even a click. Tested the battery at home before having it towed, and it tested in the normal range. Jump started it to get it off the tow truck, and let the dealer deal with it. They said the battery tested "bad" before they charged it, and now they cannot replicate the issue. They have now had it for 12 days and have Engineering involved. They preformed a parasitic drawl test, which came back normal. There were 3200 miles on it when it got towed in. Has anyone actually had a resolution to this problem?
 
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