Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just finished up a brake overhaul including replacement of rotors and pads on my 3rd Gen RAV4. I find brakes pretty straightforward but photos are always nice to have for review. You will need the correct parts first. I learned that there is some choices for the front brakes. Do not start the job unless you confirm you have the correct parts. Visually check the new parts beside your existing parts before you really tear into the job.

Brake Rotors
There are two USDM front brake rotor sizes:
1)4cyl w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD 25mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44147)


2)4cyl w/ 3rd Row Seat and 6cyl models 296mm rotor OD 28mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44146)


There is only one USDM rear brake rotor size:
1)all 4cyl and 6cyl models 281mm rotor OD 12mm rotor thickness (Centric p/n 120.44145)


Brake Pads
Brake pads will have either a Friction Materials Standards Institute (FMSI) D-plate number or some manufacturer's part number that will cross-reference to the actual FMSI O-plate number.

There are two USDM front brake pad sizes:
1)4cyl w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1210 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

2)4cyl w/ 3rd Row Seat and 6cyl models 296mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1211 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

There is only one USDM rear brake pad size:
1)281mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1212 (insert p/n of your brake pad MFG here)

You should also have any special procedures and any torque specs handy before starting the work. The field service manual (FSM) is the best place to get the most updated info. I highly recommend reading through the FSM first. The SIR regulations ensure you access to this information. Although you might have to pay for access.

Front Brakes: Same specs were listed for 275mm and 295mm brake sizes.
A)caliper bracket bolts 98 N-m (72 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 34.3 N-m (25 ft-lbf)

Rear Brakes:
A)caliper bracket bolts 88 N-m (65 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 26.5 N-m (20 ft-lbf)

Wheel Lugs:
103.0 N-m (76 ft-lbs)

Remember this is how I performed this work on my RAV4. The FSM is the best place to get these procedures. Duplicate my efforts at your own risk. However all you need is a bit of common sense or at least a friend willing to work for beverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I'll start with the fronts first.

Tools you will need and some suggested:
-ramp, floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks
-wheel lug wrench and lock key
-14mm and 17mm sockets with ratchet
-"sort-of" thin adjustable wrench (if caliper pins spin)
-torque wrench(es) (25 ft-lbs through 76 ft-lbs)
-wire and nylon brushes
-large C-clamp

Consumables:
-new front rotors for your application
-new front pads for your application
-new pad shims, guides, indicators (if needed) *these are Stainless shims that usually can be reused*
-brake cleaner (forget non-chlorinated, it's junk)
-anti seize
-warm water, dish soap, brush
-clean paper towels (forget red shop rags, they're evil)

I'm using the right hand side (RHS) as my example. Let's get this thing up were we can work on it. I used ramps but you might not need them depending on what your floor jack is like.


Find a solid location to lift with the floor jack. Then place a jack stand in a solid location a bit further back. No sense in taking any chances. Remove any wheel locks with your key, remove remaining wheel lugs with your lug wrench of choice, set the wheel aside. I usually set the wheel under the side rails for additional buffer between the car, me, and the ground. I also tend to use rubber wheel chocks behind the rear tires. Pulling the parking brake is better than none I suppose.


Remove the two (2) caliper mounting bolts Red Circles with a 14mm socket. If the slider pin starts spinning then use an adjustable wrench that fits in there to hold the pin in place.
*It's a bit tighter than the normal wrench thickness.*


Pull the caliper off of the pads and caliper bracket.


Since I'm not opening the fluid lines, I find two cable ties work great to loop around a spring coil and hold the caliper out of the way.


Since the brake pads are pretty worn they can be pulled out prior to removing the caliper bracket. New pads or less-worn pads are thicker which makes getting the outer pad out tricky. In those cases just leave the pads in place and remove along with the caliper bracket.


Remove the two (2) caliper bracket bolts Red Circles with a 17mm socket.


I used some left over 8mmx1.25 bolts in the threaded holes to help dislodge the rotor off of the hub. Not really a fan of beating rotors with mallets but you have to get that off somehow. Careful use of heat and penetrating oils are also helpful.


There we go. I suggest some cleanup work on the hub surfaces with a wire brush.


Red Arrow location should be clean so the new rotor fits in place easily.


Strange I know. New rotors usually have an oil coating that needs to be removed. A quick scrub with a nylon brush in some soapy water works better than anything else I have used.


Then I use some good brake cleaner on the surfaces and wipe with paper towels until they wipe clean.


I like to put a thin coating of anti-seize in this area.


Then slide the new rotor into place and use two wheel lugs to hold things in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Check that the slider pins in the caliper brackets move freely. If not then remove, re-grease, and re-install. Sticky slider pins are the "stupid" parts of floating caliper brakes so it is important to check these.
One of the slider pins will have an extra collar Red Circle to keep track of.
*In this RHS example this pin goes on the RHS so it is DOWN when installed. Don't mix these up.


Clean the caliper bracket in these areas Red Circles where the pads slide. A small wire brush and some brake cleaner work well. Dry fit the new pads into each spot to make sure they fit and slide through fine. If all looks good then apply some brake caliper grease to those same areas.


Clean the friction surfaces of the new pads with brake cleaner and let dry before installing. Then transfer the anti-squeal shims and wear indicators from the old pads onto the new pads.


Apply some brake caliper grease to the sliding areas on the new pads. NONE on the friction surfaces...NONE! Carefully load the new brake pads into the caliper brackets. The Red Circles are the pad wear indicators.
*In this RHS example they go on the LHS so they are UP when installed. Personally I think these wear indicators are useless due to their poor design.*


Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 72 ft-lbs.


I give the pads a squeeze against the rotor surfaces Red Arrows before installing the caliper.


Hold the caliper and cut the cable ties holding it to the coil spring. The caliper sort of sits pretty stable on top there. Use the C-clamp to squeeze the piston back into the caliper. I suggest opening the hood so you can occasionally check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder (BMC) and avoid an overflow. As you squeeze the piston back in the fluid will be displaced and raise the level in the BMC. Going slow and steady is recommended so that the dust seal around the caliper piston is not damaged. Remember to check for fluid overflow! Remove the C-clamp when done. Carefully brush off the piston surfaces with a wire brush to remove any crud.


Position the caliper so the brake line is not twisted up, you'll know when it's not right. Slide the caliper over the pads, line up the two (2) bolts with the slider pins, and install bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 14mm socket and torque wrench to 25 ft-lbs.


Replace the wheel, wheel lugs, and wheel lock. Snug the lugs and lock then use the torque wrench to 76 ft-lbs on them in a star pattern. Do another star pattern then go easy on the lock. Safely lower the car and you're pretty much done.
*oh look I left the lock key in the photo. It started raining so I was rushing, which is never a good way to work.*


Now repeat on the LHS. When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal had very little resistance. It has to take up any extra space left from squeezing the caliper piston(s). Using shorter pumps is better then going full-tilt to the floor pan. I then end up going for a drive to bed the pads to the rotors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Now onto the rear brakes.

Tools you will need and some suggested:
-floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks
-wheel lug wrench and lock key
-14mm and 17mm sockets with ratchet
-"sort-of" thin adjustable wrench (if caliper pins spin)
-torque wrench(es) (20 ft-lbs through 76 ft-lbs)
-wire and nylon brushes
-large C-clamp
-flat head screwdriver

Consumables:
-new rear rotors
-new rear pads
-new pad shims, guides, indicators (if needed) *these are steel shims that are usually needing replacing*
-brake cleaner (forget non-chlorinated, it's junk)
-anti seize
-warm water, dish soap, brush
-clean paper towels (forget red shop rags, they're evil)


I'm using the right hand side (RHS) as my example. Let's get this thing up were we can work on it.


Find a solid location to lift with the floor jack. Then place a jack stand in a solid location under the lower control arm (LCA). No sense in taking any chances. Remove any wheel locks with your key, remove remaining wheel lugs with your lug wrench of choice, set the wheel aside. I usually set the wheel under the side rails for additional buffer between the car, me, and the ground. I also tend to use rubber wheel chocks behind the front tires. Pulling the parking brake is not going to work in this case since it will make it terrible to get the rear rotors off.


Remove the two (2) caliper mounting bolts Red Circles with a 14mm socket. If the slider pin starts spinning then use an adjustable wrench that fits in there to hold the pin in place.
*It's a bit tighter than the normal wrench thickness.*


Pull the caliper off of the pads and caliper bracket.


Since I'm not opening the fluid lines, the caliper hook nicely to the upper link and holds it out of the way. Huh this is an alloy caliper, light but they get plenty crusty.


Remove the two (2) caliper bracket bolts Red Circles with a 17mm socket.


Rotate parking brake adjuster to bottom (if not already) and carefully pry out the rubber plug. You need to get into there to loosen the parking brake enough to clear the rotor.


A flat head screwdriver works great for this. You're not going to be able to see what you are doing, it will be more by "feel". Moving the toothed wheel downwards will loosen the parking brakes.


I used some left over 8mmx1.25 bolts in the threaded holes to help dislodge the rotor off of the hub. Not really a fan of beating rotors with mallets but you have to get that off somehow. Careful use of heat and penetrating oils are also helpful.
......need to find photo

There we go. I suggest some cleanup work on the hub surfaces with a wire brush. Red Arrow location should be clean so the new rotor fits in place easily.


Strange I know, again with the washing. A quick scrub with a nylon brush in some soapy water, follow up with good brake cleaner on the surfaces, and wipe with paper towels until they wipe clean. Forgot a photo of the brake cleaner but you get the idea.


I like to put a thin coating of anti-seize in this area.


Then slide the new rotor into place and use two wheel lugs to hold things in place while you install the rest of the parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Shoot I just not noticed I lost the photos of the rear pads, caliper bracket, and pins. The rear pads should be strait forward. There is a black collar on one of the pins similar to the front brakes. Same lower pin position as well. Lubricate in all of the same places as you did the fronts.


Caliper bracket loaded and ready to go.


Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 65 ft-lbs.


I give the pads a squeeze against the rotor surfaces Red Arrows before installing the caliper.


Unhook the caliper from the upper link. The caliper sort of sits pretty unstable on top there but I managed. Use the C-clamp to squeeze the piston back into the caliper. I suggest opening the hood so you can occasionally check the fluid level in the brake master cylinder (BMC) and avoid an overflow. As you squeeze the piston back in the fluid will be displaced and raise the level in the BMC. Going slow and steady is recommended so that the dust seal around the caliper piston is not damaged. Remember to check for fluid overflow! Remove the C-clamp when done. Carefully brush off the piston surfaces with a wire brush to remove any crud. Alloy calipers do get plenty cruddy.


Position the caliper so the brake line is not twisted up, you'll know when it's not right. Slide the caliper over the pads, line up the two (2) bolts with the slider pins, and install bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 14mm socket and torque wrench to 20 ft-lbs.


Replace the wheel, wheel lugs, and wheel lock. Snug the lugs and lock then use the torque wrench to 76 ft-lbs on them in a star pattern. Do another star pattern then go easy on the lock. Safely lower the car and you're pretty much done.


Now repeat on the LHS. When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal had very little resistance. It has to take up any extra space left from squeezing the caliper piston(s). Using shorter pumps is better then going full-tilt to the floor pan. I then end up going for a drive to bed the pads to the rotors and set the parking brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Dude, you're awesome!
Thank you very much!
No problem.
I do need to get back in here to finish posting the bleeding and bedding parts. I drove the RAV4 yesterday to get the new tires installed. The brakes still look good and work fantastic. If I had to re-do I would try the Akebono pads out just to see how they compare to the Advics I used. I am plenty happy with the Advics pads though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,612 Posts
One thing I would like to add. After you install the new brake rotor, you're suppose to check for lateral runout using a dial indicator to check to see where the high spots are and index the rotor to the next hole as required. This eliminate pulsating when you apply the brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
Excellent write up. One of the best I have seen. I have a question and a couple of comments/suggestions

One of the slider pins will have an extra collar Red Circle to keep track of..........
When I last did a brake service, one of the rubber collars was swollen and no longer fit properly on the pin so I left it off. What is the purpose of this collar, and do you think it will cause any problem by being removed?

Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing.
Many years ago I had removed and reinstalled the bracket on a GM car. A few weeks later, after hearing a rattling sound, I discovered that one of the bracket bolts had fallen out and the caliper was rotating on the single remaining bolt. I picked up a new bolt from the dealer and found that thread locker had already been applied at the factory. Ever since then I have been careful to not use anti-seize, ,but rather use a thread locker on the bracket mounting bolts.
When both sides are done make sure to get in and pump the brake pedal until it feels solid. Don't be alarmed when the pedal sinks to the floor.
That was also my normal procedure, but after performing a pad replacement on one vehicle, I found my brakes working at only 20% of normal. After rechecking everything I could think of, I had to bring it to the dealer. They discovered the master cylinder needed replacement. It seems that forcing the piston further into the MC than normal damaged it. Since then I have been careful to only push the pedal halfway to the floor several times until it becomes hard again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
One thing I would like to add. After you install the new brake rotor, you're suppose to check for lateral runout using a dial indicator to check to see where the high spots are and index the rotor to the next hole as required. This eliminate pulsating when you apply the brake.
True, that procedure is listed in the FSM and is certainly proper. However I chose to leave that out for a few reasons. I did point out that the FSM was important. I have yet to run into out-of-spec rotor runout in any brake overhauls (multiple models/makes). Typical DIY'ers are not the types to whip out the dial indicator let alone know how to setup and read one. Again you are correct that Toyota advises a runout check. Typically I find brake pulsing to be poor pad/rotor transfer issues more than not.


Excellent write up. One of the best I have seen. I have a question and a couple of comments/suggestions

When I last did a brake service, one of the rubber collars was swollen and no longer fit properly on the pin so I left it off. What is the purpose of this collar, and do you think it will cause any problem by being removed?

Many years ago I had removed and reinstalled the bracket on a GM car. A few weeks later, after hearing a rattling sound, I discovered that one of the bracket bolts had fallen out and the caliper was rotating on the single remaining bolt. I picked up a new bolt from the dealer and found that thread locker had already been applied at the factory. Ever since then I have been careful to not use anti-seize, ,but rather use a thread locker on the bracket mounting bolts.

That was also my normal procedure, but after performing a pad replacement on one vehicle, I found my brakes working at only 20% of normal. After rechecking everything I could think of, I had to bring it to the dealer. They discovered the master cylinder needed replacement. It seems that forcing the piston further into the MC than normal damaged it. Since then I have been careful to only push the pedal halfway to the floor several times until it becomes hard again.
Thanks, I try.

Not certain on the purpose of those black collars on the caliper pins. I would suspect they are NVH related items. While I could not really recommend operating without them but...

In the winter/salt states I choose to go the anti-seize route. Especially since they started using the new tech ice melters around me. It's really the only way to avoid the mess of getting things apart and then probably replacing hardware to reassemble. I have not had any problems up to this point but I always tighten those types of fasteners to factory spec. Blue threadlocker would probably work fine also. You might have to heat the bolts with a torch at next removal to break the threadlocker hold.

Ahh, good catch and you are right. I also pump up the brakes but worded that poorly. I will revise the post verbiage. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Excellent post on brake replacement. For what it's worth, I replaced all mine a few weeks back & am quite impressed by the kits & performance. If you decide to use these, just make sure you seat them according to directions.
Powerstop Z23 Evolution Sport. Rotors are cross drilled & slotted, pads are fiber/ ceramic. Included are rubber boots , lube and all the shims/ anti rattle clips. I think the price for all 4 wheels was about 400.00.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just replaced mine with the same Powerstop Z23 kit. However, I didn't notice much different. it still feels soft when brake. I was thinking about to bleed brake oil next to see if that will make any different.

Well, the brake works as it should be, what I am saying is that I am not that IMPRESSED. Shouldn't the brake response more quickly instead of press down 1 or 2 inch to feel it's engaged?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Thanks so much for the excellent post.


I just did the front on my 06 Sport V6 last week and I can tell you, it was a battle to get the rotor off. This is the 3rd rotor on this vehicle and it had done more than 100,000km and over 4 years. The appearance and condition of the old rotor looks just as "good" as the one on yours. It is so bad that it is useless with the 8mm bolt to assist in dislodging it. The threads literally broke off due to rust. Finally manage to get it off with a heat and a persuasive hammer. What a mess with all the rust bit falling out with every hit from the hammer.


I initially wanted just to change the pad and make it last for another year and then trade it off but after starting the work, I quickly found out that it will be full job and being on a Saturday around 1:00pm, I was lucky enough to grab a set of replacement rotor in 2 hours notice. I end up with the Wagner BD126407E that looks exactly like the ones that you had on the pictures. After that, all went smoothly. Taking the caliper bracket off took some sweat again due to the fact that the dealership put it on with an impact at the last brake job.


Next spring or late fall will be the rear rotor and pads turn. I am also researching on how to easily replace the e-brake cables at the same time since they are seized now. It is now a real E-BRAKE since it will work if I pull it up but it will not let go again when I release it. If you have any info or suggestion on how to go about with this cable replacement, I am all ear...


Thanks again for the best DIY show and tell on this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I just replaced mine with the same Powerstop Z23 kit. However, I didn't notice much different. it still feels soft when brake. I was thinking about to bleed brake oil next to see if that will make any different.

Well, the brake works as it should be, what I am saying is that I am not that IMPRESSED. Shouldn't the brake response more quickly instead of press down 1 or 2 inch to feel it's engaged?
Since all cars are different due to upkeep, age, etc, it's hard to compare accurately. However, mine took about a week to finally settle in after the usual seating procedure they recommend. Bleeding the calipers can't hurt.
Currently mine work much better than the OEM, braking starts around 1" travel & it's firm. Keep in mind the odd seating procedure they say to follow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just finished up a brake overhaul including replacement of rotors and pads on my 3rd Gen RAV4. I find brakes pretty straightforward but photos are always nice to have. You will need the correct parts first. I learned that there is some selection needed for the front brakes. Do not start the job unless you confirm you have the correct parts. Visually check the new parts beside your existing parts.

Brake Rotors
There are two USDM front brake rotor sizes:
1)w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD 25mm rotor thickness


2)w/ 3rd Row Seat and V6 models 296mm rotor OD 28mm rotor thickness


There is only one USDM rear brake rotor size:
1)281mm rotor OD 12mm rotor thickness


Brake Pads
Brake pads will have either a Friction Materials Standards Institute (FMSI) D-plate number or some manufacturer's part number that will cross-reference to the actual FMSI O-plate number.

There are two USDM front brake pad sizes:
1)w/o 3rd Row Seat 275mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1210
2)w/ 3rd Row Seat and V6 models 296mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1211

There is only one USDM rear brake pad size:
1)281mm rotor OD
brake pad D-plate #1212

You should also have any special procedures and any torque specs handy before starting the work. The field service manual (FSM) is the best place to get the most updated info. I highly recommend reading through the FSM first. The SIR regulations ensure you access to this information.

Front Brakes:
A)caliper bracket bolts 98 N-m (72 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 34.3 N-m (25 ft-lbf)

Rear Brakes:
A)caliper bracket bolts 88 N-m (65 ft-lbf)
B)caliper bolts 26.5 N-m (20 ft-lbf)

Wheel Lugs:
103.0 N-m (76 ft-lbs)

Remember this is how I performed this work on my RAV4. The FSM is the best place to get these procedures. Duplicate my efforts at your own risk. However all you need is a bit of common sense or at least a friend willing to work for beer.
Are the torque settings the same for the V6 models?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I really have not been in the forum for awhile. I am in the process of making some updates based on PM questions. Also incrementally working on moving the photos to a forum album (as suggested). It takes awhile though.
I originally left the p/n specific info out of this thread in order to keep it applicable to any parts, brands, etc. My RAV4's thread has photos of the exact p/n's I used on my particular repair. Nothing is saying you have to follow suit.


Thanks so much for the excellent post.
I just did the front on my 06 Sport V6 last week and I can tell you, it was a battle to get the rotor off. This is the 3rd rotor on this vehicle and it had done more than 100,000km and over 4 years. The appearance and condition of the old rotor looks just as "good" as the one on yours. It is so bad that it is useless with the 8mm bolt to assist in dislodging it. The threads literally broke off due to rust. Finally manage to get it off with a heat and a persuasive hammer. What a mess with all the rust bit falling out with every hit from the hammer.
I initially wanted just to change the pad and make it last for another year and then trade it off but after starting the work, I quickly found out that it will be full job and being on a Saturday around 1:00pm, I was lucky enough to grab a set of replacement rotor in 2 hours notice. I end up with the Wagner BD126407E that looks exactly like the ones that you had on the pictures. After that, all went smoothly. Taking the caliper bracket off took some sweat again due to the fact that the dealership put it on with an impact at the last brake job.
Next spring or late fall will be the rear rotor and pads turn. I am also researching on how to easily replace the e-brake cables at the same time since they are seized now. It is now a real E-BRAKE since it will work if I pull it up but it will not let go again when I release it. If you have any info or suggestion on how to go about with this cable replacement, I am all ear...
Thanks again for the best DIY show and tell on this forum.
Yea corrosion is an unfortunate challenge in some areas. Glad you finally got them off. I have not replaced parking brake cables on a RAV4 so afraid I do not have any input on those. No problem, it's a decent thread but could always use some tweaks. Thanks.


Are the torque settings the same for the V6 models?
Thanks.
Yep, they appear to be the same. At least that is how I read the torque specs in the FSM. You don't really need to quote the OP, I knew what you were after. It just takes up a ton of screen space.


does the rear rotor height make any problem if it is 1cm bigger? ( 65mm instead of 55mm ) plz help
Not sure. Probably depends on how the brake pads sit on those rotors and if the caliper/bracket makes contact with the rotor. If it makes contact with the caliper and/or bracket then you'd have to get other rotors. If there is no contact and the pads just sit a bit lower, a ridge will wear on the outer edges. Probably not a big deal. Maybe a PITA to get the pads over that ridge later on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Good writeup. Did front rotors and pads and rear pads this morning. Got all the parts on RockAuto closeout for a total of $87 (Centric rotors, and Bendix ceramic pads front and rear). All went very smoothly other than my combination wrench slipping while I was attempting to loosen one of the slider pins and smacking myself in the face with it. Split open a nice little cut over my left eye. Held pressure until the bleeding stopped, put a bandaid on, and finished the brake job like a boss. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Question and awesome write-up

Phenomenal post! I love when someone takes their valuable time to help others like this.

I have done the brakes on my 2008 RAV, compared to my 1997 Tacoma they're very easy.

The issue I am having with the RAV is when they get hot, from either heavy traffic or say a hard or panic stop, I get a rattling sound kinda like when the ABS has activated. I know it has not activated, when immediately following I will get the same although noise when I brake again. This does not happen when they're cold.

I have inspected all the parts, clips/guides, greased the grooves/slots, and ensured nothing is loose? Any ideas, is it possible they (pads) have not bedded properly? This would be the first experience I have ever had like this - I am at a loss.:crying

Wanted to add, although the noise is ugly and annoying there is no damage. Which is why I believe that they have not bedded properly and have glazed. Wondering if anyone has had this issue. I have done brakes on Toyota, Porsche, Harley Davidsons, Yamaha, BMW, et al with no issues like this...
 
1 - 20 of 57 Posts
About this Discussion
56 Replies
32 Participants
Salsaman06
Toyota RAV4 Forums
Rav 4 World is the internet's largest Toyota Rav4 SUV and EV online forum community. Discuss towing, modifications, and more.
Full Forum Listing
Top