Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

41 - 59 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
So after disabling ad block, re installing chrome, trying IE still nothing worked. When on Jarharm's albums I can view the thumbnail photos of the brake overhaul album but not the full photos. I went and tried on my buddy's desktop computer and they show up there so It's just an issue with my computer. Thanks for the advice
Hmm. I can see Jarharms first 3 posts with pictures, but not posts 4 and 5. The pictures don't seem to load. I've disabled adblock in Firefox, and tried using IE and Chrome to no avail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Anyone tried to swap out bigger calipers and rotors from another Toyota/Lexus? I did last weekend...

Stock single piston caliper/Rotor setup 275mm (10.8")



334mm (13.1") rotor and 4 piston caliper from a Lexus IS350. Caliper didn't sit right, will have to try an LS430 caliper next and fab up my own bracket.



Any luck on this? I happened to be looking into brake rotors and pads today for an upcoming change over. I'm wishing our pedals had more initial bite.

I sort of looked at "sport" options but in the past I've had really bad luck with that stuff, usually they're overly meant for people who ride the brakes a lot or track their cars and worry about fade. I used Stop Tech (Centric) slotted rotors and matching "street sport" Stop Tech pads and it was literally like braking with blocks of wood until they warmed up. I live in hills and this was not ok to do cold braking with blocks of wood that don't bite when you need them out of the gate.



I too tried other calipers, I looked in some Scion and Lexus vehicles (not for the Rav) but without knowing their bolt spacing it was trial and error and the calipers are expensive and a lot of time trialing and erroring just to get them in hand, hold them up, and immediately see they won't mount.

In the end I went back to OEM Toyota pads and they were nice, lots of initial bite but not a lot of power.

The Rav4 braking isn't bad but I do wish it had more initial bite and more power behind it so I could brake with the weight of my foot in traffic as opposed to having to lean into it more. My girlfriend's ST is perfection, totally drivable and has a really nice clean bite like I'm sure the IS350 does that you're trying to swap in.

Might try Hawks this time around but again I do zero tracking and fade and heat aren't really issues so I don't want something that needs to warm up, just want something that grabs and feels effortless like a larger caliper and rotor would probably do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I have purchased new OEM front pads and shims for the front of a 2012 V6.


There are two shims per pad.


Is there any official Toyota recommendation for greasing the shims?


Thank You
 

·
Your Humble Administrator
2008 RAV4 Limited V6
Joined
·
16,525 Posts
I have purchased new OEM front pads and shims for the front of a 2012 V6.


There are two shims per pad.


Is there any official Toyota recommendation for greasing the shims?


Thank You
I have never greased the shims and have not had a problem. I used OEM Advics pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I just finished installing Centric rotors/ProACT pads/fresh fluid bleed off. Got everything cinched up yesterday and went for a drive.. couldn't lock brakes up, felt like blocks of wood. Parked on a hill and depressed brake pedal until the hill hold function came on. Only slightly held the car.

Today I went wheel by wheel re-bleeding the system, doubling down with some syl-glide on the the bleed screws to insure no air getting sucked in. Cinched everything up, went for a drive. Not much improved. Mushy pedal.

Had a buddy come rescue me for a two man operation to insure a proper bleed. After all said and done there were only a trace amount of very fine bubbles, almost appeared like a faint streak of another fluid or contamination coming out with brake fluid. We repeated open/close cycles on each wheel until we could get at least three cycles in a row that were clear.

Took it for a drive, much better but still a fair amount of pedal travel, pedal still feels somewhat mushy. Car will brake now, albeit less confidently than before. Wish I had just left the old fluid be. I'm in the boat with others where the pedal feel got worse despite better pads and new rotors. Original ones were warped and losing their initial bite.

I feel like giving up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
IED, that is certainly disappointing. I wonder how much of the difference could be the fluid bleed issue and how much the different rotors and pads? :confused: I hope you get some comments from folks who can help you figure it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,248 Posts
Brakes are easy to do if you do it correctly but unfortunately many things can go wrong. :ponder:

When you pressed the brake to get the piston to go back to position, did you pressed the brake pedal all the way to the floor? The master cylinder could be ruin if the brake pumping was done incorrectly after the brake install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Fixed most of my issue. Fortunately I've read about the master cylinder issue so I've kept a block of wood below the pedal just in case but it's a good thing to mention. My buddy who later helped me do the two man bleed is a mechanical engineer who has done many brake jobs hadn't heard of this issue before, so there are those out there with lots of experience who've gotten lucky in a sense.

We did find a construction staple/end of a chain link in one of my wheels when I went to remove it for the two man bleed. Because of that I ended up taking the car to Les Schwab the next day to have this tire repaired. They fixed it easily enough but then also performed a full brake flush at the same time and double checked my work.

Flushing with a brake bleeding machine made a significant difference, I almost think I will always do this always in the future from here on. Well worth the $60 they charged. The pedal is now more firm like it used to be and the hill assist function works fine. From driving in to driving off it took no more than 40 minutes. They advised that the pedal will still feel slightly spongy as new pads and rotors need time to settle in, typically 200-500 miles from installation (322-805km).

We went on a trip this weekend with the Rav and put about 400mi (645km) on the brakes of mostly highway driving with some small town stop and go and they're definitely starting to feel much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Great write up I can see all the pics on the front brakes procedure but I can't see any of the pics for the rear procedure. Any chance the OP can look into this and fix? And yes I looked at the OPs profile and the pics aren't there either - or at least I could not find them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
So I've got a 2012 I4, without the third row seating. Will likely need to do a brake job in the next few months, and would like to up the braking power a bit if I can - at times I'll be towing a ~1,200 pound trailer that has electric brakes, but the more stopping power the better, especially over hilly terrain. Can I install the larger (V6) rotors and pads up front, or possibly some other kit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
So I've got a 2012 I4, without the third row seating. Will likely need to do a brake job in the next few months, and would like to up the braking power a bit if I can - at times I'll be towing a ~1,200 pound trailer that has electric brakes, but the more stopping power the better, especially over hilly terrain. Can I install the larger (V6) rotors and pads up front, or possibly some other kit?
At the very least you would have to change out the calipers, caliper mounting brackets, and pads in addition to the rotor. not sure about the master cylinder but that prob has to be swapped out as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Correction to the torque specs for the front caliper bracket bolts. At least for the 2012, those specs are: 79 ft-lbs/107n-m

This is according to TIS.

You were referring to this right.. "Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 72 ft-lbs.".


I already did 72 and I have a 2012 v6. I sure don't want to take the wheels etc all off again..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
You were referring to this right.. "Slide the bracket over the rotor, line up the bolt holes with the knuckle, and install two (2) bolts. I anti-seize these bolts before installing. Use the 17mm socket and torque wrench to 72 ft-lbs.".


I already did 72 and I have a 2012 v6. I sure don't want to take the wheels etc all off again..
Correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi all. I'm a newbie ;-)... Great thread. I am planing to do brake job on my wife's 2008 4cyl 2.0 vvti model. Never done that before but seems like an easy job. Pitty there is no pictures for rear brake and bleeding job. I have one question..can somebody please give me a link to download repair manual because I can not find it anywhere. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Now onto the rear brakes.

Tools you will need and some suggested:
-floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks
-wheel lug wrench and lock key
-14mm and 17mm sockets with ratchet
-"sort-of" thin adjustable wrench (if caliper pins spin)
-torque wrench(es) (20 ft-lbs through 76 ft-lbs)
-wire and nylon brushes
-large C-clamp
-flat head screwdriver

Consumables:
-new rear rotors
-new rear pads
-new pad shims, guides, indicators (if needed) these are steel shims that are usually needing replacing
-brake cleaner (forget non-chlorinated, it's junk)
-anti seize
-warm water, dish soap, brush
-clean paper towels (forget red shop rags, they're evil)


I'm using the right hand side (RHS) as my example. Let's get this thing up were we can work on it.


Find a solid location to lift with the floor jack. Then place a jack stand in a solid location under the lower control arm (LCA). No sense in taking any chances. Remove any wheel locks with your key, remove remaining wheel lugs with your lug wrench of choice, set the wheel aside. I usually set the wheel under the side rails for additional buffer between the car, me, and the ground. I also tend to use rubber wheel chocks behind the front tires. Pulling the parking brake is not going to work in this case since it will make it terrible to get the rear rotors off.


Remove the two (2) caliper mounting bolts Red Circles with a 14mm socket. If the slider pin starts spinning then use an adjustable wrench that fits in there to hold the pin in place.
It's a bit tighter than the normal wrench thickness.


Pull the caliper off of the pads and caliper bracket.


Since I'm not opening the fluid lines, the caliper hook nicely to the upper link and holds it out of the way. Huh this is an alloy caliper, light but they get plenty crusty.


Remove the two (2) caliper bracket bolts Red Circles with a 17mm socket.


Rotate parking brake adjuster to bottom (if not already) and carefully pry out the rubber plug. You need to get into there to loosen the parking brake enough to clear the rotor.


A flat head screwdriver works great for this. You're not going to be able to see what you are doing, it will be more by "feel". Moving the toothed wheel downwards will loosen the parking brakes.


I used some left over 8mmx1.25 bolts in the threaded holes to help dislodge the rotor off of the hub. Not really a fan of beating rotors with mallets but you have to get that off somehow. Careful use of heat and penetrating oils are also helpful.
......need to find photo

There we go. I suggest some cleanup work on the hub surfaces with a wire brush. Red Arrow location should be clean so the new rotor fits in place easily.


Strange I know, again with the washing. A quick scrub with a nylon brush in some soapy water, follow up with good brake cleaner on the surfaces, and wipe with paper towels until they wipe clean. Forgot a photo of the brake cleaner but you get the idea.


I like to put a thin coating of anti-seize in this area.


Then slide the new rotor into place and use two wheel lugs to hold things in place while you install the rest of the parts.
You know you can use slip lock pliers to push the piston back in You really don’t need a c clamp anymore unless you have a big truck
 
41 - 59 of 59 Posts
Top