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Discussion Starter #1
Cleared my ABS codes by cleaning all the wheel sensors/rings. Fixed my 5th gear popping-out with scrapyard fist-full of gears. Put on two new front CV shafts. Now a drive-about finds that at 3000 rpm in 5th gear when I floor it to simulate a pass, the engine revs-up without the Rav going faster. Yes, clutch slipping. Crap... From what I read a clutch is an unpleasant task that will end up with a coolant change/flush.

I read in the manual that vehicle has to be supported about 3 feet high, the k-frame has to drop down, and then engine / transmission together drop to the floor and slid out from under, and then wrestle the engine off the transmission. Or something to that effect.

Has anyone actually done this job? Any tricks?

Just get a shop to agree to do it for $500 and then let them get stuck with under-estimating the full-on re-creation of the vehicle required to change the #&@#$?!! clutch.

Ugliest clutch I've done to this point is a 98 Beetle TDI, suspend engine from above, remove all powertrain mounts, remove front half-shafts, lower transmission-end of powertrain, raise front end of engine, remove bellhousing bolts and transmission comes off if flywheel is 30 degrees past #1tdc and notch in flywheel clears knob on transmission. Then line all that crap up again going in.

From what I read, this Rav is going to be uglier.

Any advice is appreciated.
 

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We do have a few 4.1 experts. Hopefully one can give you helpful info.
 

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yea, i had to do it, and honestly not the most enjoyable thing in the world, i bought the haynes manual, honestly not that helpful for this car. We did not have a lift, but we used two shitty jackstands, a floor jack, and an engine hoist. The big thing is to not be in a huge rush, if you haven't done it before, think of it as a 2 weekend job.
The steps I took was
1. disconnect wiring harness from ecu inside of car.
2, drop subframe with hubs and breaks (just suspend your breaks to the shocks)
3. remove rear driveshaft and disconnect exhaust
4. power steering was a pain, dont know how others did it, but we just disconnected the steering wheel and dropped the rack with transaxle motor assemby.
5. disconnect trans cooler, coolant line, and suspend ac compressor out of the way.
6 remove air box, coolant resivor and all the vaccum stuff bolted to firewall.
7. Disconnect shift linkages and be very carefull when lowering the engine that they do not snag.
8. now suspend engine from lift remove the final two motor mounts and lower assembly to ground.
9. Now you get to split the case, advice from someone who tried to not remove much, take off all the brackets off the back first, will make your life easier


honesty if they offered to do it for 500 that is a steal.

if you want more detail just ask, but this is the basic overview
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Moesby, I have lotsa stuff taken off so far... cv-axles, rear driveshaft, K-frame with lower control arms, transfer-case brace under power steering pump, front powertrain mount, rear powertrain mount, left side powertrain mount, for-aft subframe member, airbox, starter, shifter cables. Given that three of four engine mounts are off, the engine is suspended from above.

My thought is to continue by taking off the a/c compressor and suspending it. then disconnect engine harness, and disconnect rest of engine stuff, then lower engine/transmission to floor. Once on the floor I can wiggle it around and get to it. Or even pick the whole mess up and put it on a truck and take it all to scrap and get something else to drive.

I have some questions...

The 4wd center diff lock actuator shifter thing, how is it mounted, and what couples it to the transfer case? I see a rubber boot that seems to cover a Z-shaped shaft that looks like it rotates to lock/unlock center differential.

And once I have the engine/transmission laying on the floor, and getting to disconnecting the engine from transmission, does the transfer-case part need to disconnect from the rest of the transmission to get the transmission away from the engine, ie the bellhousing clear of the flywheel?

Do you recall what mounts the transfer-case to the transmission and/or the engine? I did find/remove a forged steel brace/bracket from the firewall side of the engine at the pulley (right side of vehicle) end. Is there anything else mounting the transfer case to the engine? Or at that point is the transfer case mounted only to the transmission only by those six polts around the shaft flange?

We are in a sudden blast of 15F winter here, and I am working inside an un-heated tin-steel building. That type of building actually feels colder inside than ambient temp, so I am paused for a day or so until winter goes away.

Thanks again,
Mathew Banack
 

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Ok, ya you are making good progress. So to answer your questions

1. the 4wd actuator was just bolted on with a few bolts and you can remove it easily. Inside the rubber z shaped boot is the linkage to the actuator for center diff lock, the big cylindrical device is the vaccum powered actuator(why they did not use a servo is beyond me) i just removed it. Later used Elle's vacuum guide to find the order since all my marks got rubbed off. The actuator does not rotate, it is a push pull action.

2. No on the positive side you do not need to remove the transfer case from the transmission. once the engine and tranny seperate like 1 inch you just rotate the transmission/transfer case backwards, and it will slide out.(rotate towards the back of the car kind of idea)

3. Do not worry about separating the transfer case, however if i remember the transmission bolts to the the engine with bolts coming from both the engine, and transmission side (to keep these in order i just punched them into a piece of cardboard in the orientation they came out). There is also a brace on the front of the engine with like 4 bolts, a brace behind the engine underneath the intake. As well as a plate like brace that connects the transfer case to the engine(closer to the timing belt cover on the backside).

4. Yea i did mine in -30C but luckily had a heated shop. Best of luck, hopefully that helps
 

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Highly reccomend doing timing belt, water pump, and thermostat while it is out, if unknown condition. Could save you a lot of time later.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
While its out... lotsa stuff I will do in addition to what you suggest... Front crankshaft seal, rear main crankshaft seal, power steering belt, rear driveshaft u-joints, and whatever else is ugly to get-to, and suspect in condition.

I was surprised at the crazy - two foot pipe on a two-foot breaker bar - amount of torque to break loose the front two bolts holding the k-frame to the body. I will definitely be discharging a full can of rust penetrant fluid film

such as:

among the six bolt holes up inside the k-frame attachment points. I've seen pictures of rusted-out k-frame attachments, and I don't want to go there. My k-frame attachment points aren't rusted from the outside, but the ends of the bolts I took out had rust on them, so there is water/rust happening on the inside.
 

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Ah perfect sounds good, ya my dutch self did not not want to put to much money into the vehicle :)

I have heard those horror stories, luckily my car was not from this area(northern bc) so it was almost rust free, but still took some penetrating fluid and a breaker bar
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Finally got the trans separated from the engine.
165018


I looked all over the lump of casting that is the center differential and transfer case and rear drive thing, and I do not find a level plug. Is the center differential and transfer case a separate sealed oil cavity, or is it all the same cavity with one drain plug on the main transmission and another drain plug for the low-area under the center differential? If its all one cavity, the main drain would take out 3.5 quarts, and the center differential drain another 1.5 quarts, which is about what I found. Of course, I could fix what ain't broke, and take it apart and look...

One of the things I did was remove the clutch slave cylinder from the front of the transmission bellhousing. In spite of applications of penetrant, both bolts broke, leaving about 1/4" sticking out of the side of the casting. How lucky can I be... 1/4" sticking out instead of 1/4" below the surface...
165019


Vise grips got one bolt out, but the vise grips just chewed the other protruding bolt round without budging it. So using a 7018x1/8 rod on 110A DC, I welded a blob on the chewed-off end of the bolt. Put the vise grips on the blob, and I thought the vise-grips slipped or the blob busted off. No, the application of heat broke the rust loose, and the broken stub screwed out with almost no effort. Both broken bolts out, cussing dumpster-fire averted.
165020


Moseby's advice above; separate an inch or so then rotate transmission to rear. Which I did, no go, the center differential lump was running into the cast-iron ear on the bottom of the block. Shaking and wiggling and it finally came apart. My mistake was trying to rotate the transmission around the horizontal side-to-side axis concentric with the engine crankshaft. What is actually required is to rotate the transmission (counter clockwise viewed from the top) around the VERTICAL axis, with the center of that axis at the rear edge of the flywheel.

Once all apart, I took off the flywheel, and find that the rear main seal is not leaking at all. The rear main seal I ordered ($3.03cad) with the clutch kit is not needed, I'm not going to disturb it and fix what ain't broke because when I do that, it usually ends up broke. So, if anyone wants the new-in-box rear main seal, they can have it for cost of packet postage.

The new clutch disc measures 0.098" thicker than the old. Flywheel goes to town tomorrow for surfacing. I see theres a step in it, a few thou around the rim, the step will make the machining a bit more expensive.

I find that the plastic alignment tool will be useless, there is a 5/8" (approx) pilot shaft on the plastic tool, but there is no pilot hole in the flywheel. The tool just wobbles in the indentation in the centre of the flywheel, about 1/4" up and down and side to side. I will have to trial-and-error center the disc from the outside edges. Not my preferred solution, but no other choice. Given that theres no pilot hole to hit with the transmission shaft, the transmission can go on a smidgen off-kilter, until its time to line up the dowel pins. If I can start one or two bolts, I can pry the clutch lever to ease pressure on the clutch and allow the disc to move and center itself. Hope...
 

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Nice job 👍, yea definitely did do some wiggleing to get it free. For aligning the clutch, we did not even have the alignment tool, so my solution was to put an extension on a socket and then slide a socket onto that, was not perfect but worked. Then loosely aligned the flex plate thing, and then struggled for an hour to mate the tranny and motor. Good luck !
 

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Is the center differential and transfer case a separate sealed oil cavity, or is it all the same cavity with one drain plug on the main transmission and another drain plug for the low-area under the center differential? If its all one cavity, the main drain would take out 3.5 quarts, and the center differential drain another 1.5 quarts, which is about what I found.
It’s all one cavity. Two drain plugs, one fill port.
 

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So using a 7018x1/8 rod on 110A DC, I welded a blob on the chewed-off end of the bolt.
It brings a tear to my eye when people already know how to do things like this.

No seriously, having worked around a lot of people nearly a decade younger than me for a while and not a single one knew how to remove stubborn bolts or broken threads. Should have seen one guys face when I showed him how to rethread something lol.

And now I feel old.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I'm over 60, so older than dirt... learned to weld in 1st grade. Never welded for a living.

The ugliest/dumbest thing I ever welded on was a broken bolt in an oleo-link from an airplane nose wheel, trying to get a broken bolt out. Turned out the link was made of some sort of magnesium alloy, it started on fire, and in seconds it burnt itself out of my vise, and burnt a 6" hole in the concrete pad in front of the shop. A very bright burn, even through the welding glass, way brighter than normal weld.

Thankfully, no such adventure getting broken bolt out of Rav transmission.

Today, I got the flywheel to town and back from resurfacing, and got clutch bolted to flywheel, and transmission bolted back to engine.

After sleeping and dreaming and thinking about it, I decided to change out the non-leaking rear main seal. Pulled old seal out by putting some sheet metal screws in it and pulling with pliers. Tapped the new seal in place, did not remove the seal housing. So that un-used rear seal from yesterday is used up.

The provided clutch installation alignment tool was useless, this transverse engine application with one-piece mainshaft does not use a pilot shaft going into the end of the crankshaft, so the plastic pilot-shaft thing on the end of the plastic alignment tool just goes into a space thats way too big. A snap-on shallow broach 3/4" impact socket (3/8 drive) was the exact size to snug-fit inside the splines of the clutch disc, so I ground a 45 degree chamfer on the end of the socket, which will mate into a 45 degree machined step inside the end of the crankshaft. Put the clutch bolts in finger tight, hammered my "engineered" alignment tool into the taper machined inside the end of the crankshaft. I did feel the disc move a smidgen. Tightened up each of the six bolts a couple turns, and measured from rim of flywheel to outer edge of disc in several places around circumference, all measurements within a few thou. Tightened the clutch on the rest of the way.

The trick to getting the transmission back onto the block is to bring it together kind of crooked, with the closest point of bellhousing to block being at the lower-rear ear on the block. Rotate transmission forward around the bulge of the clutch on the flywheel. Tight but it goes. Took me a couple hours of shaking and wiggling.

Once the bellhousing surface is true to the surface of the block, the splines of the transmission shaft can line up and engage the splined collar of the clutch. Mine did, so my "engineered" alignment tool must have worked. To get and keep things lined up, I used two of the long k-frame attachment bolts to keep block and transmission aligned while I turned the flywheel with a screwdriver on the teeth. As you use bolts to draw transmission to block, always check that things are not binding or messing-up by turning the engine over with a screwdriver on the flywheel every few turns. Shift the transmission into any gear, and while feeling with a finger inside the cv-shaft hole for the transmission to be turning, with 3rd or 4th gear engaged, you have to move the flywheel about six inches to feel any movement in the cv-shaft. Make sure its not binding as you tighten it in, and make sure the transmission moves. Pay attention to the effort it takes to move the flywheel with a screwdriver without the transmission in place, with the transmission bolted in and snugged, the effort should be close to the same.

Tomorrow I put some of the rest of that big mess of parts back on.
 

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Sounds like a nice and quick way to learn about magnesium 😂
Yeah sounds like you’ve got it figured for putting it back together not the most fun I’ve had I just used will power and two people. Sounds good keep us updated!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Very distracted today, only got an hour into the clutch swap reassembly.

Just to see if it can be done, I am doing the clutch replacement without removing engine from vehicle. So far, so good.

A couple of bolts to take apart and reassemble are in that really tight area under the intake maniforld and between the engine and the firewall. There are two bolts - 14mm head - that hold the center diff-lock actuator and bolt through a brace to the top of the center diff lock bulge of the aluminum transmission housing. The heads of the bolts face up and rearwards.

I started by building an engine support from 3x4 beams on each fender, and two 3x4 beams across. Scrap pieces of 1/2" plate with 5/8 holes for 5/8 all thread, and chain links to the two engine lifting hooks. That safely and precisely supports the engine and power train.

Then I removed the k-frame including lower control arms, and sway bar, by removing the three bolts from each lower ball joint and the six bolts through the k-frame to the body. I unbolted the steering rack from the k-frame and left the steering rack hanging by the tie rods and steering shaft and hoses. Steering rack does not move much, its well supported, In order to unbolt the steering rack, I had to remove the clips holding the sway bar bushings, the right side bolt holding the rack runs right into the sway bar, so moving the sway bar was necessary. Of note, once the sway bar is unbolted from the k-frame it does not come out or go back in, its trapped by the k-frame. So when you put the k-frame back on, make sure the sway bar is laid in, it won't go in later. When lowering the k-frame, the front-to-rear longitudinal frame bar and front and rear engine mounts come along.

Then start unhooking stuff, cooler lines, three electrical plugs - reverse, speedo, and center diff lock. Unhook shifter cables, unclip them from bracket, and unbolt and set aside the shifter relay lever. Take out the two CV Axles by removing the hub nuts and popping the axles out of the transmission.

As mentioned in previous post, I unbolt the clutch slave cylinder from the transmission bellhousing, rather than un-hook the hydraulic line and go through the pita that is bleeding. As soon as you detach the slave cylinder, squeeze it compressed with your hand and wrap about 10 wraps of electrical tape around it to keep it compressed. Theres a spring inside the slave cylinder to maintain some preload tension, and the spring will push the piston out, and theres no putting the piston in without trashing the o-rings and requiring a new slave cylinder. Unbolt the steel hydraulic line and tie the whole thing back to the firewall.

The primary selector lever has a little nylon square end that engages with the primary selector rod, don't lose it.
165172


With engine supported by chains, take out the right-side engine mount. There are two forged steel "braces" that brace the engine to the block, one on the front-center and one on the back-right under the power steering pump. Also in under the power steering pump are two bolts holding the big round vacuum operated center diff lock actuator. There are also two bolts (previously mentioned above) that hold the center diff lock actuator to a brace and to the center diff housing. Those are the ugliest two bolts in this whole process. 14mm heads. I cracked them loose with a 3/8 drive long handled flex-head ratchet, then ran them out with a 1/4 drive stubby ratchet and a 9/16 socket. There is one 14mm head bolt holding the tin clutch cover to the transmission bellhousing. You can see it from underneath, and reach hand up around center diff housing to crack it loose with a wrench and run it out with 1/4 drive ratchet.

I'm sure there are things to disconnect that I forgot to mention, but when you look at it / do it, they will be obvious.

At this point there are four bolts holding the transmission to the engine block. I built a 12" x 12" plate to set into the lift toe of my service jack, and screwed pieces of wood to the plate to support the transmission at its high points. I also use a ratchet-strap down from my engine support beam to the left-side engine mount bolts to support the far end of the transmission. A ratchet strap allows the transmission to wiggle way more than the lift plate on the jack. I also used a wide top screw-jack on the tailshaft housing of the transmission.

With the transmission supported, undo those last 4 bolts. If you have everything unbolted, it will come apart easily. If you forgot a bolt, it won't, don't force it or you will break something. Separate the bellhousing to about 2.5 inches, at which point the transmission shaft will come clear from the clutch spline collar. At that point, the ear on the rear of the block runs into the center diff housing lump. Continue separating the bellhousing from the block at the front, prying wiggling, and suddenly it will go pop. And you can lower the transmission to the floor.

Assembly is the reverse.

I have no idea if its quicker to drop the engine and transmission together and separate them on the floor. It probably is, because thats what the service manuals recommend. Just because leaving the engine in-place while dropping transmission to change clutch is possible, it doesn't mean it is wise or prudent to do so. Just because doing a 360 degree wheelie on an IT 175 is possible, it doesn't mean it is wise or prudent to do so.

In the home-stretch now, I still have a bit more reassembly to do, tomorrow is chocolate overdose day. See what Monday brings.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Assembling stuff, noted a couple of 5/16" (or so) diameter metal tubes sticking out of the lower tank of the radiator. On my manual trans Rav4, nothing was/is connected to these tubes. Are these tubes for an auto-trans fluid (to coolant) heat exchanger/cooling loop?
 

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the trans cooler for the manual has its own little lines running in front of the radiator, and is connected with two braided lines to the transmission, close to the fill point
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I finished assembling everything, took it for a drive, turns out clutch actuation is not right. As I press the clutch pedal, clutch does not disengage until almost to the floor, and at that point, the clutch is not quite disengaging when the pedal is fully depressed, as moving the shifter from neutral into first-gear has some resistance. That resistance to shift into first goes away completely with engine not-running, it shifts right in.

Tomorrow its bleed the clutch some more, hopefully that straightens it out.

I hope to all heck I don't have to take this all apart again...
 
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