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I checked the relay and fuses and they're fine. I just had the radiator replaced two weeks ago, is that a connected system? Maybe they drained the refrigerant? I'm going to try adding later, but shouldn't the compressor at least cycle on and off? If that doesn't work I guess my Rav4 just won't have ac. I'm not spending thousands to fix that.
 

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The compressor won't come on if the system is low on Freon. And you can't just add it. The system must be leak tested and evacuated first. A leak could have happened during the radiator replacement. And even that sounds suspicious unless it was damaged in a collision.
 

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The compressor won't come on if the system is low on Freon. And you can't just add it. The system must be leak tested and evacuated first. A leak could have happened during the radiator replacement. And even that sounds suspicious unless it was damaged in a collision.
So maybe go to Valvoline and have them refill it? The radiator itself had a hole in it, the car's never been in any accidents. I didn't think to check the account after getting the radiator replaced. So what happens if I add? Can I vent it myself then add?
 

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So maybe go to Valvoline and have them refill it? The radiator itself had a hole in it, the car's never been in any accidents. I didn't think to check the account after getting the radiator replaced. So what happens if I add? Can I vent it myself then add?

I don't think that Toyota has used Freon in its A/C systems for some time since its use has been banned due to its effect upon the planetary ozone layer. But if you wish to have the system evacuated and refilled I believe that it still has to be done so that the refrigerant can be prevented from being vented into the atmosphere, so it probably will have to be done by a shop with the proper equipment. It may be possible simply to add refrigerant to the system, but as Dr. Dyno notes there may be a leak, which needs to be located and repaired.
 

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hi, my 4.2 had an AC problem. it was the magnetic clutch. they put in a refurbished magnetic clutch and the AC worked fine.
it cost us a lot of time to discover what was wrong.

good luck !
 

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hi, my 4.2 had an AC problem. it was the magnetic clutch. they put in a refurbished magnetic clutch and the AC worked fine.
it cost us a lot of time to discover what was wrong.

good luck !
I just had the water pump replaced, followed by the radiator two weeks ago. I don't think the radiator fan worked since then but I don't know if the two are related or not. I'm starting to think Toyota's are crap cars. Over $2,000 in repairs in 6 months. And I bet this clutch is expensive, too. I may just have to let Chase repo the car and drive my Focus.
 

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... I'm starting to think Toyotas are crap cars. Over $2,000 in repairs in 6 months. And I bet this clutch is expensive, too. I may just have to let Chase repo the car and drive my Focus.
Recommendation: Don't take your Focus to whoever is working on your Toyota. :doh:
 

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... I'm starting to think Toyotas are crap cars. Over $2,000 in repairs in 6 months. And I bet this clutch is expensive, too. I may just have to let Chase repo the car and drive my Focus.
Recommendation: Don't take your Focus to whoever is working on your Toyota.

They've worked on the Focus many times. If these two systems are related and it just needs a/c okay, but I'm guessing the radiator fan isn't related to if the car has refrigerant. I'll check all the fuses again later. I didn't see any with issues. Maybe I'll buy some new relays on the way home and test with that. If the a/c compressor is screwed up I can probably do the swap myself. It looks fairly simple. Certainly easier than changing the back 3 spark plugs under the intake manifold.
 

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Changing the AC compressor will still require that the AC line evacuate and check for leaks. Then a refill. I think Dr. Dyno is on the right track. The AC system was damaged during the repair done to your radiator as well as the water pump replacement. It could also be a damage condenser that might have suffer a stone strike causing a leak.
 

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Changing the AC compressor will still require that the AC line evacuate and check for leaks. Then a refill. I think Dr. Dyno is on the right track. The AC system was damaged during the repair done to your radiator as well as the water pump replacement. It could also be a damage condenser that might have suffer a stone strike causing a leak.
I noticed there are two fans on my radiator when I looked closer....both electric (my cousin said check the belt and I was like "what belt, it's electric"), anyway, neither one of them turns on at all. I just looked at a what is the difference page, so the radiator and condenser are in the same spot and those fans I thought were for the radiator are for the condenser? When I look up radiator fan or condenser fan I get the same exact picture of the two fans that I'm talking about.
 

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Both fans pull air thru both the radiator and condenser which are mounted one in front of the other so a radiator fan is a condenser fan. Most of the time the fans don't run at all with one coming on if the engine gets too warm. The test for that is letting the engine idle until the temperature gauge comes up. Then at least one fan should come on. Should take 5-10 minutes. Both fans come on during A/C operation but since yours isn't activating probably due to low refrigerant that's likely disabling them too.
 

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Both fans pull air thru both the radiator and condenser which are mounted one in front of the other so a radiator fan is a condenser fan. Most of the time the fans don't run at all with one coming on if the engine gets too warm. The test for that is letting the engine idle until the temperature gauge comes up. Then at least one fan should come on. Should take 5-10 minutes. Both fans come on during A/C operation but since yours isn't activating probably due to low refrigerant that's likely disabling them too.

Would they have needed to vent the refrigerant to replace the radiator?
 

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Would they have needed to vent the refrigerant to replace the radiator?
My guess is yes because A/C system components need to be removed in order to replace the radiator. But I'd suggest you ask them.
In any case as others have mentioned the regulations for handling refrigerants are very strict. It must be recovered with special equipment. Then it is usually processed and reused. It is never simply vented.
 

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Would they have needed to vent the refrigerant to replace the radiator?
My guess is yes because A/C system components need to be removed in order to replace the radiator. But I'd suggest you ask them.
In any case as others have mentioned the regulations for handling refrigerants are very strict. It must be recovered with special equipment. Then it is usually processed and reused. It is never simply vented.
Apparently it was just the ac being low. I'm kind of suspicious that it was more. They did the whole thing for free. AC recharge is usually around $100 where I live.
 

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Magnetic clutch AC

I just had the water pump replaced, followed by the radiator two weeks ago. I don't think the radiator fan worked since then but I don't know if the two are related or not. I'm starting to think Toyota's are crap cars. Over $2,000 in repairs in 6 months. And I bet this clutch is expensive, too. I may just have to let Chase repo the car and drive my Focus.
Maybe it is worth a chance to check out the magnetic clutch of the AC :serious
 

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The compressor won't come on if the system is low on Freon. And you can't just add it. The system must be leak tested and evacuated first. A leak could have happened during the radiator replacement. And even that sounds suspicious unless it was damaged in a collision.
The system does not have to be evacuated just to add "Freon". it has to be evacuated if it has been opened up to the atmosphere allowing moist air inside or if it has a major leak that had to be repaired. and no one uses Freon anymore. not legal.
 

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Apparently the trade name Freon is in use today "Freon™ 134a is an HFC retrofit refrigerant for R-12. It is used in medium- and high-temperature stationary commercial refrigeration, as well as chiller systems and home appliances. In addition, it can be used to retrofit existing R-12 refrigeration and air conditioning systems."

In this case after a shop replaced the radiator the A/C didn't work. My reasonable assumption is they likely caused a leak that would need to be repaired and just adding R-134A isn't a long term fix.
 
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