Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since about 93k miles when I first found out about the oil issues following an oil change when I saw barely 1 qt come out, I have been religious in tracking the oil consumption. If you are worried you may not fail the test and get the Toyota fix, make sure you do NOT bring it to them following a recent oil change. I noticed that the engine burns a lot more oil as the oil ages. Aka burns less oil immediately following an oil change vs if you put a few 1000 miles on it. My 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
AFAIK you're required to change the oil when you start the test.


But you can ask to see the level on the dipstick before they seal it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
...AFAIK you're required to change the oil when you start the test...
Actually, per the letter sent out (for USA owners) the dealer will 'check level and fill to the maximum line' and the oil to do that is free. Only if an oil change is due, then it would be done and the owner pays for the change.

Since the guideline is so strict, I think it would be fair to bring it in during the second half of the OCI and run the test with the "older" oil if that is when the burn increases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
lets say, from the max level dot, than monitor mileage ranging from 3400km -6000km. you will notice big amount of oil was consumed.

my 2009 2AR-FE engine (uses 0w20) started consuming noticeable amount of oil at about 100K ish. it's at 122K now. it ran about 3700KM now, and the engine oil level is almost in the middle (6.5 out of 10) of the min/max dots.

93K miles? you may probably need to check your PCV valve, clean or replace it.

it will burn no matter what, just have it oil serviced regularly, start doing the oil change at around 5000km to 6000km instead of 8000k. that's just me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Actually, per the letter sent out (for USA owners) the dealer will 'check level and fill to the maximum line' and the oil to do that is free. Only if an oil change is due, then it would be done and the owner pays for the change.

Since the guideline is so strict, I think it would be fair to bring it in during the second half of the OCI and run the test with the "older" oil if that is when the burn increases.


Wow, that's not what my sheet says, see the bolded part below:


Warranty Enhancement Program 812-FAQ


Q.4.a) What is involved in the oil consumption test?

A.4.a) Any authorized Toyota dealership will check the oil level in your vehicle and you will be required to have an oil and filter change at the Toyota dealership (charges will apply to customer). The dealership will then seal the system and request that you return to the same dealership when you have accumulated between 1,900 km and 2,100 km. Upon return, the dealer will confirm how much oil the vehicle has consumed. If the quantity consumed is in excess of the amount specified in the technical service bulletin, your vehicle will be eligible for parts replacement.


I had to have an oil change performed... despite having to add a litre of fresh stuff every week! lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Wow, that's interesting. There must be a big difference in how Toyota USA and Toyota Canada are handling it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I previously posted this comment I made in another section but this thread may be a better place to put it.

"I have a 2007 model that I noticed started using quite a bit of oil a couple of years ago around 80K miles. I change my own oil and use 0W20. The manual and the oil cap has both 0W20 and 5W20 listed as the type of oil that can be used.

I later received the service bulletin by mail and took the vehicle in to my local dealer for an oil consumption test.

In order to pass the test and get the engine rebuilt the engine needed to use more than a quart of oil in 1300 miles.

Since I change the oil on the vehicle myself I was confident the test would prove it, but to my surprise the car only used about half a court in that time.

Dumbfounded, I convinced myself I had something wrong with me! After driving the vehicle and again changing the oil with 0W20 the engine began to use oil much faster again.

I then dawned on me that the dealer may have put 5W20 in the vehicle for the test and after checking the receipt that is indeed what happened.

I told the dealership that the car uses the oil faster with 0W and they were skeptical at first saying that "all the oil is 20 weight when the engine is warm"....which is true. I presented research I had done that concluded the much of the oil leaks through the seals when the engine is warming up and cooling down so that more of the lighter 0W is burned up than 5W.

I am currently redoing the test with 0W. I dealer was all too happy to redo the test after I explained the situation since it is Toyota that will pay them for the work.

I will update once the test is completed."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Drive the hell outta the car for the first 1000 km. Then keep an eye on the oil pressure light if it blips on while stopping quickly or turning sharp (mine did).


If all else fails, cheat the system.


Go to a nice open spot, throw it in park and put a brick on the pedal so the rpms run up to about 2500-3000 rpm, keep an eye on the temps and let er burn while in park... no mileage added hahaha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
I previously posted this comment I made in another section but this thread may be a better place to put it.

"I have a 2007 model that I noticed started using quite a bit of oil a couple of years ago around 80K miles. I change my own oil and use 0W20. The manual and the oil cap has both 0W20 and 5W20 listed as the type of oil that can be used.

I later received the service bulletin by mail and took the vehicle in to my local dealer for an oil consumption test.

In order to pass the test and get the engine rebuilt the engine needed to use more than a quart of oil in 1300 miles.

Since I change the oil on the vehicle myself I was confident the test would prove it, but to my surprise the car only used about half a court in that time.

Dumbfounded, I convinced myself I had something wrong with me! After driving the vehicle and again changing the oil with 0W20 the engine began to use oil much faster again.

I then dawned on me that the dealer may have put 5W20 in the vehicle for the test and after checking the receipt that is indeed what happened.

I told the dealership that the car uses the oil faster with 0W and they were skeptical at first saying that "all the oil is 20 weight when the engine is warm"....which is true. I presented research I had done that concluded the much of the oil leaks through the seals when the engine is warming up and cooling down so that more of the lighter 0W is burned up than 5W.

I am currently redoing the test with 0W. I dealer was all too happy to redo the test after I explained the situation since it is Toyota that will pay them for the work.

I will update once the test is completed."


that's interesting - while 0w20 is lighter than 5w20 at non operating temperatures, when cold they are both still thicker than what the engine needs - the tolerances are huge if at operating temperature, when the oil is much thinner, the car isn't burning oil, but when cold & the oil is much thicker, it is. interested to see the research you have?


the only thing I've read that would suggest any difference is that 0w20 is a lot more volatile than 5w20 re: NOACK volatility
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
that's interesting - while 0w20 is lighter than 5w20 at non operating temperatures, when cold they are both still thicker than what the engine needs - the tolerances are huge if at operating temperature, when the oil is much thinner, the car isn't burning oil, but when cold & the oil is much thicker, it is. interested to see the research you have?


the only thing I've read that would suggest any difference is that 0w20 is a lot more volatile than 5w20 re: NOACK volatility
I don't have actual data that is worthy of publication in a scientific journal...just anecdotal evidence.

Engine Oil Consumption
"Also, many late model engines are factory-filled with low viscosity synthetic oil (5W-20, 0W-20, 0W-40, etc.) to reduce friction and improve fuel economy. Low viscosity oil is thinner so it can leak past rings and valve guide seals easier than heavier viscosity oils. Synthetic oil is a great lubricant for all types of driving but it is NOT a good break-in oil - especially if the cylinders were not honed properly."

from cartalk.com
"Engine wear is most severe at startup, when oil is at its coldest / least protective. The way it sounds to me is that the viscosity:temperature slope is steeper with 0w20 than with 5w20. At ideal temp, both oils are the same. At cold temps, 0w20 is thinner than 5w20 (which is better), though both are still too thick. At overheating temps, the 5w20 provides more protective than the 0w20."

RAY "RAY: Finally, keep changing the oil regularly. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that adding oil is a substitute for changing oil, but it's not. In fact, when your engine is regularly running low on oil, the remaining oil is working even harder. Three quarts are doing the work of four. So that oil needs to be drained out and replaced more often rather than less often."

since as far as I know 0w20 oil is all synthetic this is interesting:
Oil types, ratings, viscosity, choosing good oil
"{Synthetic problems
The only negative (besides price) on the synthetics is oil seals. Although the makers claim to have eliminated this problem, I've found starting to use synthetics in anything but a new or newly rebuilt engine is asking for all kinds of oil leaks. These leaks won't go away by switching back to regular oil: the seals are trashed. So if your vehicle has more than 50,000 or so miles, or more than a few years old, I'd recommend staying away from the synthetics."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
the quote about engine oil consumption is countered by the cartalk.com quote, which was pretty much what I was saying.


I'm not sure about the Ray quote. I think technically it is true in the sense that, if you put 1000 mi on 3 quarts of oil, vs 1000mi on 4 quarts, then 3 quarts would technically have had to work harder. also seems irrelevant to what I was saying. if you're burning oil, you still need to add oil before your full change, for exactly that reason.


the "negatives" with synthetics last quote is outdated information, I believe only applying to very old cars.


article from Consumer Reports about oil consumption in newer cars:

Excessive Oil Consumption Isn't Normal - Consumer Reports

I completely agree with this. Especially with modern oils, unless there's a legitimate problem, modern engines should not be burning any oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
the quote about engine oil consumption is countered by the cartalk.com quote, which was pretty much what I was saying.


I'm not sure about the Ray quote. I think technically it is true in the sense that, if you put 1000 mi on 3 quarts of oil, vs 1000mi on 4 quarts, then 3 quarts would technically have had to work harder. also seems irrelevant to what I was saying. if you're burning oil, you still need to add oil before your full change, for exactly that reason.


the "negatives" with synthetics last quote is outdated information, I believe only applying to very old cars.
yeah, my reasoning from my initial post as to why 0w20 gets burned up faster than 5w20 may be all wrong but all I know is that for my engine it seems to be true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
fair enough - my old evo just seemed to have a weird dislike of 0w30 - but 5w30 and 10w30 ran fine. good luck to you though, hope it works out well!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top