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yo wassup guys anyone on here have a set of all terrain tires on their rav4 4.4? im interested in putting a set on the rav just want to see some pictures on what they would look like with factory wheels. im looking at the BFgoodrich all terrains t/a k02. I get a pretty good deal on them like 156 each
 

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I will be installing ATs this spring 235/65/r17s. I will run my 225s on my aftermarket 17x8s for a month or so before I switch out. Stay tuned :)


You can also check out Ryan Millen's RAV4 Rally
 

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I actually want to do the same thing.
I found the BFG All Terrain T/A K02 and plan to put them on my stock Limited 18" wheels. They are 255/55/R18.
That said, stock tires are 235/55/R18.

Is anyone running 255mm wide tires? And if so, do you have any rubbing issues?
I would not be modifying my suspension - only plan to do the tires..

Thanks!
 

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I couldn't imagine there being a significant change.

Here are the spec deltas:

Difference Diameter inches
28.18 vs 29.04
Width inches
9.25 vs 10.04

Minimal impacts to speedo and drivetrain.

These numbers might go plus/minus for the specific tire choice.


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Well, I got a price (too high) from the dealer for BFG All Terrain T/A K02's at p255/55R18 today and he balked saying emphatically that they would rub on the front inner fenders and possibly the strut assembly. I didn't debate and the conversation was by email. I don't know that he knows so I am still very interested in what others here find out as they try and go this approx. .9" D and .9" width up from the stock P235/55r18's on the hybrid limited.
 

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I actually want to do the same thing.
I found the BFG All Terrain T/A K02 and plan to put them on my stock Limited 18" wheels. They are 255/55/R18.
That said, stock tires are 235/55/R18.

Is anyone running 255mm wide tires? And if so, do you have any rubbing issues?
I would not be modifying my suspension - only plan to do the tires..

Thanks!
OK. Here's a deal. The width of original 235/55/18 of the most tires vary from 9,6 to 9.7 inches. The width of 255/55/18 usually 10.4 which makes 0.8 inch difference. Dividing by 2 we'll get 0.4 inch extra of tire to deal with. I don't think this could be an issue, but you also have to consider the following:
1) You tire will be heavier.
2) With the wider tire's contact surface your gas consumption will go up.
3) The overall diameter of course will also be bigger, which will lead to inaccurate speedometer readings. Overall diameter of 235/55/18 is 28.1 or 28.2 inch depending on tire's brand and 255/55/18 is from 29 to 29.1
Here's a link to calculate the speedometer readings of different tire sizes at different speed:

https://www.tacomaworld.com/tirecalc

In order to stay with the same (original) overall diameter you have to go for 255/50/18 which is 28 to 28.1. In this case your speedometer reading will be more or less accurate.
4) The fitment also depends on your wheel's width and its offset. The lower (30 - 35) offset can easily compensate that 0.4 inch of extra tire inside the space.
Good luck.
 

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4) The fitment also depends on your wheel's width and its offset. The lower (30 - 35) offset can easily compensate that 0.4 inch of extra tire inside the space.
Good luck.
Alfa, can you clarify what you mean by the lower offset please? What lower offset are you referring to? Since he was planning on using the stock rims doesn't the offset stay the same? I thought, perhaps mistakenly, that the offset was a function of the rim design and dimensions and not the tire.
 

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Alfa, can you clarify what you mean by the lower offset please? What lower offset are you referring to? Since he was planning on using the stock rims doesn't the offset stay the same? I thought, perhaps mistakenly, that the offset was a function of the rim design and dimensions and not the tire.

The all rims/wheels (whatever you call them) may have different offsets.


The offset of a wheel is the distance from its hub mounting surface to the centerline of the wheel. The offset can be one of three types (measured in millimeters).*

Zero Offset
The hub mounting surface is even with the centerline of the wheel.

Positive
The hub mounting surface is toward the front or wheel side of the wheel. Positive offset wheels are generally found on front wheel drive cars and newer rear drive cars.

Negative
The hub mounting surface is toward the back or brake side of the wheel's centerline. "Deep dish" wheels are typically a negative offset.
If the offset of the wheel is not correct for the car, the handling can be adversely affected. Often, when changing the width of the wheel, the offset will also need to change to maintain proper clearances inside the wheel well. If the offset were to stay the same while you added width, the additional width would be split evenly between the inside and outside. For most cars, this won't work correctly. We test fit thousands of different vehicle and wheel size combinations to confirm which ones work correctly. Our extensive database allows our sales staff to offer you the perfect fit for your vehicle.
*Backspacing, similar to offset, is the distance from the hub mounting surface to the inside lip of the wheel (measured in inches).

Good luck.
 

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The all rims/wheels (whatever you call them) may have different offsets.

The offset of a wheel is the distance from its hub mounting surface to the centerline of the wheel. The offset can be one of three types .....
Good luck.
I had a handle on the definition of offset. I was just trying to figure out why you were saying he would have a different, lower, offset by just changing the tires and not changing the rims. My mistake.
 

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I ducked out last min and purchased a set of Nitto 420S 235 / 55 / R 18 (same size as factory).
I truly believe that a set of all-terrains will fit on our factory wheels w/ factory suspension, but since this a company car, I didnt want to take the slight risk of it not working out and having problems w/ my company. If it were my own vehicle, I would have added wheel spacers or suspension spacer...but I really hope someone tries using these

YokohamaÂ*Geolandar A/T-S

Be braver than me! Give them a go and post pics!
 

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Mojoe - I like the set up you have. I'm looking to do the same on my 2013 rav4. Go down to a 17" wheel with bfg AT tires. Do you know what the offset was for your wheels? I'm having trouble figuring that part out. Thanks!
 

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Mojoe - I like the set up you have. I'm looking to do the same on my 2013 rav4. Go down to a 17" wheel with bfg AT tires. Do you know what the offset was for your wheels? I'm having trouble figuring that part out. Thanks!
Thanks! They are 17x8 with a +15 offset

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@mojoe Do you know if those same tires will fit on the factory 17's ?

Afternoon DBroman3,


A 245/65R17 is recommended to fit on a rim width of 7-8.5". The factory Steel wheels are 17x6.5" I believe, but the Alloys are 17x7". I would not be afraid to mount a 245/65 on the factory 17x6.5", and would easily mount them on a 17x7".


V/r,
Joey
 

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I would like to get some A/T tires since my all seasons probably have 2 years left. Instead of buying new set of all seasons, and another new winter tire set, I would rather have A/T tires. Never had A/T tires before but are they comparable to dedicated snow/ice tires?

Tire rack says the BFG KO2 225/65/17 won't fir on my stock rim. The tires I have now are 225/65/17. Is this because the tread is much thicker than all seasons?
 
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