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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did some searching here and I see there are a LOT of people complaining about this problem.

My '07 Limited alloys are not all as bad as this, but, most have some sort of damage.

Is there anything I can do short of replacing the wheels? Any way to remove the corrosion, touch up and not have it look like crap?

I think I've answered my own questions but thought I'd ask anyway.

Really, really, REALLY don't want to shell out $$$ for new wheels. And I like the all-season tires I have now, no changing those.

TIA,

-kj-
 

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Our 2008 Limited v6, was purchased 2 years ago / low mileage gem, in near mint condition.
- but the 6-spoke alloy rims, had similar corrosion bubbles under the factory powder coat finish
- they didn't look bad, but still :((
- I reserved the corroded rims, specifically for our snow tires / and scraped the rusty steelies

So I purchased 2013 7-v-spoke Highlander rims, for $800 Canadian.
- rims only saw, 3 weeks of use
- for spring / summer / fall
- these 4 dedicated rims, will never be exposed to winter & road salt

The corrosion damage on aluminum rims, is too expensive to fix properly.
- glass bead blasting & powder coating, isn't cheap
 

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The alloys are painted and clear coated. Have them redone.
 

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Might be just cheaper to buy new wheels unless you do them yourself. There are aftermarket stock looking for about $150 per.

The salt really kills alloy wheels. I make sure to scrub my wheels before storing them for the season. Wife makes fun of me for doing so, but I am just saving my wheels in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well after considering my options (cost, time, inconvenience) I decided to scour ebay and found these two wheels (separate sellers a little more than an hour away). Got them for $75 each with stems and sensors included. They aren't perfect but they aren't gouged, they are straight, and most of all, they are not corroded in the slightest. They are a perfect match for the other two on my car already.

Questions:

What's the best way to remove wheel magnet adhesive tape?

Should I move the sensors from my existing wheels over to these?

What's the best way to protect these? Regular automotive wax?

Is there anything I can coat the insides with to reduce brake dust accumulation?

I plan to sell the corroded ones for whatever I can get to defray the cost of the 'upgrade.'

TIA,

-kj-
 

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Well after considering my options (cost, time, inconvenience) I decided to scour ebay and found these two wheels (separate sellers a little more than an hour away). Got them for $75 each with stems and sensors included. They aren't perfect but they aren't gouged, they are straight, and most of all, they are not corroded in the slightest. They are a perfect match for the other two on my car already.

Questions:

What's the best way to remove wheel magnet adhesive tape?

Should I move the sensors from my existing wheels over to these?

What's the best way to protect these? Regular automotive wax?

Is there anything I can coat the insides with to reduce brake dust accumulation?

I plan to sell the corroded ones for whatever I can get to defray the cost of the 'upgrade.'

TIA,

-kj-
Nice find.
-Magnets? You mean the lead balancing weights. You don't need to remove the old ones. When they mount the tires for you they will remove the old and re-balance with new weight.
-You will either need to swap the sensors over or the shop can program your TPMS computer for the new sensor. That is if the new sensors are still operational. Sensors only have a 5-10 year life span, before the built in (non replaceable) batteries die. If swapping you will typically need a rebuilt kit (new o-rings).
-You can wax the wheels, but you need to wash and scrub them regular. Washing them is all I ever do and I have wheels that are 12 years old that are still in good shape. I wash them every time I swap out tire/wheel winter/summer. Hose down to get rid of the grit, then brush and rinse again. Must do this to both sides. Washing them will get rid of brake dust. Enough so that you won't notice the build up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice find.
-Magnets? You mean the lead balancing weights. You don't need to remove the old ones. When they mount the tires for you they will remove the old and re-balance with new weight.
-You will either need to swap the sensors over or the shop can program your TPMS computer for the new sensor. That is if the new sensors are still operational. Sensors only have a 5-10 year life span, before the built in (non replaceable) batteries die. If swapping you will typically need a rebuilt kit (new o-rings).
-You can wax the wheels, but you need to wash and scrub them regular. Washing them is all I ever do and I have wheels that are 12 years old that are still in good shape. I wash them every time I swap out tire/wheel winter/summer. Hose down to get rid of the grit, then brush and rinse again. Must do this to both sides. Washing them will get rid of brake dust. Enough so that you won't notice the build up.
Haha lol yeah, duh...weights. :) I removed them anyway and used gasoline (outside) to break down the adhesive. Going to get some adhesive remover and do it right next time.

Sensors on the wheels I just got should be newer than the ones on my car now, so, they can just reprogram the car to accept them then.

Washing and scrubbing is no problem, I'm a nut about keeping the car clean, if regular wax is all I need on the outside, I'm all set.

Thanks, kj
 
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It must suck to be unable to ignore the little stuff that nobody cares about, and to be so inept or short of simple tools to do it yourself and save major dollars.
.
 
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