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Discussion Starter #1
And what is rpm at 4th and 5th gears at say, about 70 mph?

I want to compare Isuzu 205 hp at 5400 rpm to RAV4 269 hp at 6200 rpm. Like what the Rav4 hp is at 5400...apples to apples.

torque 214 lb at 3000 rpm Isuzu to 246 lb at 4700 rpm RAV4.




Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info, much appreciated!

Compare these two for towing my 1700-2000lb boat:

Isuzu Rodeo 3.2L V6, 4sp auto
4500lb rating
weighs 4163 lbs
RWD/4WD body on frame

RAV4 V6, 5sp auto
3500 lb rating
weighs about 3655
FWD/AWD Unibody construction

Looks like the RAV4 has the edge in power (hp and torque) at similar RPM
And one more gear to choose from. I imagine you could leave it in 4th gear all day long when towing. 3rd in Rodeo revs too high for highway speeds.

OPINIONS please, will the RAV4 equal or exceed the overall towing ability of the Rodeo?

Joe
 
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Wannabe said:
Thanks for the info, much appreciated!

Compare these two for towing my 1700-2000lb boat:

Isuzu Rodeo 3.2L V6, 4sp auto
4500lb rating
weighs 4163 lbs
RWD/4WD body on frame

RAV4 V6, 5sp auto
3500 lb rating
weighs about 3655
FWD/AWD Unibody construction

Looks like the RAV4 has the edge in power (hp and torque) at similar RPM
And one more gear to choose from. I imagine you could leave it in 4th gear all day long when towing. 3rd in Rodeo revs too high for highway speeds.

OPINIONS please, will the RAV4 equal or exceed the overall towing ability of the Rodeo?

Joe
What is the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating (GCVWR) of the Rodeo?

A lot of the time, manufacturers only allow towing their max with a driver on board, you must derate the rating for any additional people or cargo in the vehicle. I have no idea if Isuzu does this with the Rodeo or not. The GCVWR (hopefully in the owner's manual or on the vehicle label sticker on the doorjamb) will provide the info you need to answer that question.

The 2006 RAV4 can pull its full load even with a fully loaded car (accounting for the tongue weight of the trailer). I bet in reality that the 4500 rating of the Rodeo is a lot closer to the 3500 rating in the RAV than you might think.

I personally think the RAV would EASILY tow 2000 pounds without breaking any sweat. It will certainly do it with more gusto than the Rodeo, since it has less weight and more power.

It does not matter where the horsepower is, go by the max. The Toyota engine will wind it up and run there all day long. With the 5-speed box, it will have no problems finding a suitable gear. Torque does matter where it occurs, obviously the lower the better. I was actually quite surprised the RAV's torque curve was as flat as it is and the amount of torque available down low: very impressive! I can't wait to drive the V6!

The only big negative in towing with the RAV is its short wheelbase (don't know the WB of the Rodeo). I would not want to tow over 22' with it, and would be nervous about going over 20', but that's just really some gut feelings without a whole lot of concrete basis.

Don't sweat the unibody versus body-on-frame thing. Unibodies are stronger and lighter!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting thoughts!

My boat is 17' long and the whole trailer combo with boat and motor is about 23'

the wheelbase of the RAV4 is within an inch or two of the Rodeo.

the Rodeo is a dog unless you drive the heck out of it.

Joe
 

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At highway speeds, I suspect that the weight of the trailer would have less effect on how it tows than would air resistance. If your boat has lots of drag, the Rav may not tow all that differently from the Rodeo. I towed a 2000# pop-up camper with an Accord V6 and it hardly ever shifted out of overdrive.
 
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Wannabe said:
My boat is 17' long and the whole trailer combo with boat and motor is about 23'
My guestimates on trailer length are based on a conventional or RV type trailer. I don't know much about boats/trailers. They are typically more stable than an RV, so I would be inclined to think you could go longer without any ill effects.

Definitely true about aerodynamics versus weight. I've been crunching numbers with different brands of trailers, and even with a full-height travel trailer, a heavier trailer with a smaller frontal area will require less horsepower to move it than a lighter trailer with a larger frontal area.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Boat type trailers are generally fairly stable by design, with the long tongue. You just never see boat trailers swaying, you know, the tail wagging the dog so to speak. The weight of the boat is fairly far back from the hitch, so the trailer axle is a long way behind the tow vehicle. makes it track very well. And it is easy to get the right amount of tongue weight on the hitch.

They (fishing boats) are also fairly aerodynamic riding behind the tow SUV, much more so than a RV trailer.

I'm inclined to add trailer brakes but this discussion had more to do with the power it takes to get the load moving, not stopping it!

thanks for the input
Joe
 
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