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I am considering trading my Tacoma for a 2020 RAV4.

I camp and have a rooftop tent but don’t do any crazy off road stuff. I just want to be able to get to some gravel and dirt road campsites and have some more dry storage options.

I also want improved gas mileage over my Tacoma’s (17-18 Avg).

Anyone else make a similar choice? Regrets?
 

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I went from a 2015 Tacoma which I ordered new. I sold it and ordered a 2020 Hybrid Limited which I took delivery on January 3rd, 2020. So far I've been more than happy with the change. Ease of entry and exit, 38 mpg, easy to park and plenty of room. Do regrets, however keep in mind I'm not a camper or an off road guy.
Bill
 

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No regret and mpgs were decent but after owning for a year I am glad to be back to quiet interior and smooth sounding v6. The major caveat for me with newer rav4s. That might be improved with Prime though.
 

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This was one of my favorite vehicles. I briefly sold it for a 2019 F250 before getting into my 2019 Rav4 XLE Premium AWD. I have my Rav relatively heavily modified for this type of vehicle, with the largest lift and tires Ive seem on this model.

I love the safety and convenience features, and I love the efficiency. It is not quite as capable offroad, but it has gotten me everywhere I needed to go. In fact, it has even handled lifting tires okay, and the only time it has been stuck was when I high-centered before my latest round of lifts (though I was able to back out).

My wife still drives her 2016 4Runner TRD Pro, but honestly if I could trade it straight across for an XSE I probably would.

The only thing I havent really tried is sleeping in it. The above 4Runner has a full fold-out sleeping platform, and her 2016 4Runner is also juuuust big enough to sleep in. I am not sure about the Rav.
 

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The nice thing about the Rav4 Hybrid for camping is that you can idle and use the A/C for a Gollan or two per day. You can also use a 1000 watt 12 volt to 120volt inverter to run small appliances such as an electric cook top, a small microwave, a refrigerator and a coffee maker. Obviously you don't run all of these appliances at the same time. I think the Rav4 Hybrid makes a great camper for these reasons.


I am considering trading my Tacoma for a 2020 RAV4.

I camp and have a rooftop tent but don’t do any crazy off road stuff. I just want to be able to get to some gravel and dirt road campsites and have some more dry storage options.

I also want improved gas mileage over my Tacoma’s (17-18 Avg).

Anyone else make a similar choice? Regrets?
 

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While waiting on my wifes 2019 Rav4 XSE to come in, I ended up leasing a 2019 Tacoma in June 2019 with the TSS off road package. So now I have both. If gas mileage is the primary want and off roading is secondary, then my recommendation would be to go with the Rav4 w/4WD (hybrid or non-hybrid). Having said that, I did put a Gator tri-fold hard tonneau cover on my Tacoma which gives me plenty of dry enough storage area. While I do get minimal seepage of water down the sides of the rear lift gate and the front of the bed, I use some cheap all rubber mats on the bed which lifts all items enough such that a little water rolling around isn't a problem.

I hope this helps!
 

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I went from a 2003 taco to my 2019 XSE. I gave the truck to my dad, so I don't feel too bad, haha. Love both, the XSE just makes more sense as my daily and camping needs.
 

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have a 2011 Taco, we bought a Rav Hybrid as a get around town / family travel machine. This means that since the taco is not the daily driver, it's cleared for more modding and wheeling... [that's an inner monologue, haven't had the discussion with my wife...]

Honestly, the difference between the two is shocking. The taco is a pretty spartan vehicle, certainly not awash in creature comforts by any means - just a good, reliable truck. Rav is quieter, comfortable to drive, and I spent 30 canadian bucks of gas on a road trip, on something that would have cost me more than 100 in the taco. Prior to the Taco, I had a well built BJ60 set up for overlanding and supporting backcountry adventures.

For pure overlanding, I'd take the taco - simpler, easier to fix, less expensive to repair. if it's about long distance trips with a few fire roads and forestry trails, I think the rav is more than capable, and you'll appreciate it for the other 95% of the driving you do with it. If you're doing the weekend warrior camping and exploring and not looking for a dedicated off-road machine, I think you'll be quite happy with the Rav.

I haven't had the rav out in the rough stuff [don't intend to] but we've had some wild weather of late and it's held up pretty well in the deep wallowy snow - better than I expected - certainly better clearance than I would have thought.
 

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I have a 2016 4Runner and sometimes think about trading it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. 15-16 MPG in the winter with a set of dedicated tires is not that great. RAV4 gets 28MPG with dedicated snow tires in the winter. However with that said, I feel more confident in a deep snow with 4Runner even though I run dedicated snow tires on RAV4. I have not tried it with RAV4 because I was afraid (no proof it will get stuck) of getting stuck in the deep snow. Towing is one area that RAV4 does not do as well as 4Runner or Tacoma. The resale of my 4runner is very good so I will not lose too much if I were to trade it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. With the gas price below $2.00, there is less incentive for me to trade. RAV4 has a lot of pluses but it all comes down to what you need the car to do for you.
 

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I have a 2016 4Runner and sometimes think about trading it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. 15-16 MPG in the winter with a set of dedicated tires is not that great. RAV4 gets 28MPG with dedicated snow tires in the winter. However with that said, I feel more confident in a deep snow with 4Runner even though I run dedicated snow tires on RAV4. I have not tried it with RAV4 because I was afraid (no proof it will get stuck) of getting stuck in the deep snow. Towing is one area that RAV4 does not do as well as 4Runner or Tacoma. The resale of my 4runner is very good so I will not lose too much if I were to trade it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. With the gas price below $2.00, there is less incentive for me to trade. RAV4 has a lot of pluses but it all comes down to what you need the car to do for you.
How much can the 4Runner tow? I know with the Adventure it can tow ~3700lbs. I'm not sure I would want to tow 3700lbs with my Rav4 Adventure. But I would be fine towing one of my other 2000lbs vehicles.
 

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+ the 4Runner will last for 20 years or more with proper maintenance. The downside, along with fuel MPGs is the safety features that the $ runner does not have. Automatic braking etc have to work one time and they may have save your life, someone else and/or $$$$$.

Perhaps the way to go now is the 2020 4Runner which finally has some of the auto safety stuff. Obviously if you drive a lot, the MPGs are going to be a concern. That along with the price of a 4Runner.

I have a 2016 4Runner and sometimes think about trading it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. 15-16 MPG in the winter with a set of dedicated tires is not that great. RAV4 gets 28MPG with dedicated snow tires in the winter. However with that said, I feel more confident in a deep snow with 4Runner even though I run dedicated snow tires on RAV4. I have not tried it with RAV4 because I was afraid (no proof it will get stuck) of getting stuck in the deep snow. Towing is one area that RAV4 does not do as well as 4Runner or Tacoma. The resale of my 4runner is very good so I will not lose too much if I were to trade it in for a RAV4 Hybrid. With the gas price below $2.00, there is less incentive for me to trade. RAV4 has a lot of pluses but it all comes down to what you need the car to do for you.
 

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First post here!

Went from an 07 Tacoma DCLB 4x4 to a 19 RAV4 XLE. Having just gone through one lengthy Canadian winter here, I estimate I've saved easily $100/month in gas, even with pushing winter tires on the RAV. I love the many "extras" I have now - heated seats and wheel, zone climate, more room in the back seat for my tall kids. Heck, I even have HEATED DOOR MIRRORS now!

The one big thing I miss is my Tacoma's usability - it was a bit beat up so I didn't hesitate to toss just about anything in the back, haul junk to the dump, etc. Just hose it out and away you go.
 

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How much can the 4Runner tow? I know with the Adventure it can tow ~3700lbs. I'm not sure I would want to tow 3700lbs with my Rav4 Adventure. But I would be fine towing one of my other 2000lbs vehicles.
From the Toyota manuals:
Toyota 4Runner = 5000 lb (trailer weight + cargo weight)
RAV4 LE without towing package = 1500 lb (trailer weight + cargo weight)
RAV4 with towing package = 3500 lb (trailer weight + cargo weight)
 

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So if you will entertain my post (I am an owner of a Nissan Frontier which is my DD - Rav4 is the family vehicle.). The Fronty gets used at minimum once per month as a truck - to haul something, as well as the occasionally foray off road that would be more than I would dare in any CUV.

If you not hauling stuff regularly, then its definitely not worth it. Your going to enjoy life in a Rav4 much more for all the mentioned reasons (mileage, comfort, easy to park, etc). I have a flippack tri fold top on the truck. Its close enough to water proof but much more of pain to get things in and out. If a Rav won't get you off road far enough but aren't hauling stuff, then you probably would be better suited in a 4 Runner - or similar.

The RAV4 is so much more enjoyable to drive I often wish it was my DD.
 

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I should have taken a picture. I hauled 5 large wooden pallets to the dump ratchet-strapped to the top of my Rav last weekend :p .
 

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I traded my 2013 Tacoma SR5 4WD 4door for a 2019 RAV4 Adventure in November 2019. So far I like the truck-like look, safety features, comfort, fuel efficiency and handling of the RAV4. I do miss the versatility, resale value and tow capacity of the Tacoma but do not miss the difficult entry (I am now a senior citizen). I purchased a small utility trailer with a 2000# capacity for yard chores which can be easily towed by the Adventure model. All that said I do have a bit of buyer remorse not getting a new Tacoma but my plans are to retire to a warmer climate in 2 years depending on how we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis.
 
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