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This is my first car with AWD. I have a 2016 Rav4 hybrid. I can find no button on the dash, no pref in the display apps. I checked the manual but could only ding about 3 sentences that states there is AWD. Does it just work without my having to enable it? Is it noticeable or will I feel it? Bad weather is upon us so it would be helpful to know.
 

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One of the differentiators between "AWD" and "4WD" is that AWD is always on and you don't need to do anything to manage it.
 

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This is my first car with AWD. I have a 2016 Rav4 hybrid. I can find no button on the dash, no pref in the display apps. I checked the manual but could only ding about 3 sentences that states there is AWD. Does it just work without my having to enable it? Is it noticeable or will I feel it? Bad weather is upon us so it would be helpful to know.
The HV uses a unique system called "AWDi", standing for "intelligent". The Hylander HV uses the same thing. The rear drive is electric only, there's no mechanical link between front and back. It uses a 75HP electric motor, computer controlled, when needed. If you set the main display to the Energy Monitor screen it shows you more or less when the rear is getting power. Primarily its when you accelerate, corner, get wheel slippage, etc. Its a pretty effective system, but its different than most so it may not always do what you expect. One thing it will never do is spin the rear wheels. For that matter, front wheels are not allowed to spin free in a HV either.

If you find yourself stuck, try turning off the traction control with the button on the dash. But that's ONLY to be used as an "un-sticking" tool.
 

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So if the tires are not allowed to spin, is this better? Sounds like there will always be traction if there are no tires spinning?
 

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Sounds like there will always be traction if there are no tires spinning?
I would not go that far. You can have no spinning and no traction.

So if the tires are not allowed to spin, is this better?
It's better in the sense that you are not doing something pointless. Unless you are one of those people that try to melt snow by spinning.
 

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Its not a question of "better". If a MG is allowed to over-speed because of spinning tires, it blows the MG or the converter , or both, in a pretty spectacular way.

With TC engaged its possible to find yourself in a position where you can floor it and nothing happens at all. Disabling TC will allow a bit more slippage but the system still won't let you spin wheels uncontrollably. Anyway the TC will help get you out of more situations than you would without it. Its just that when forward motion stops the TC system might behave as above. As with any car, the key is to maintain forward motion.
 

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I gave my wife a portable shovel and a snow joe.

Getting one of those Sterilite under the bed bins to store these going to be wet things in the cargo area.
 

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I would not go that far. You can have no spinning and no traction.



It's better in the sense that you are not doing something pointless. Unless you are one of those people that try to melt snow by spinning.
Damn wife tried to reverse her Honda Accord on a 6" windrow two winters ago and got stuck. Hopefully the RAV4 will be much more suited for her stunt.
 

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This is my first car with AWD. I have a 2016 Rav4 hybrid. I can find no button on the dash, no pref in the display apps. I checked the manual but could only ding about 3 sentences that states there is AWD. Does it just work without my having to enable it? Is it noticeable or will I feel it? Bad weather is upon us so it would be helpful to know.
AWD, traction control and so, will engage when needed, but my 2013 rav4 has a button to LOCK the 4 wheels into traction (AWD/4WD whatever you call it), works up to the speed of 40 km/h and disengage at that point. Useful if you are trying to move out of a snow bank or similar. traction control will work independently of if this feature is used or not

Did they remove this feature on hybrids? I haven't heard anyone mentioning it before.
 

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No such button for the RAV4 as Toyota doesn't want the electric motor to get toast, this is a response I got from another thread here on RAV4World.
 

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No such button for the RAV4 as Toyota doesn't want the electric motor to get toast, this is a response I got from another thread here on RAV4World.
it doesn't take much to reach 40 in my car, if you are pushing hard to move out of not good road conditions, a few seconds, probably less than a minute. if a hybrid can't handle a minute or so of AWD ON because it will get toasted then I don't want a hybrid.

Depending on road conditions AWD, could be ON/OFF or ON for a while to handle the car in those conditions, if Hybrid can't handle AWD at low speeds what happens if suddenly is needed at high speeds for a few seconds, the car blows out.

they could use just gas, or maybe not, if you enable something like that, up to 40km/h, or to a lower speed.
 

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it doesn't take much to reach 40 in my car, if you are pushing hard to move out of not good road conditions, a few seconds, probably less than a minute. if a hybrid can't handle a minute or so of AWD ON because it will get toasted then I don't want a hybrid.

Depending on road conditions AWD, could be ON/OFF or ON for a while to handle the car in those conditions, if Hybrid can't handle AWD at low speeds what happens if suddenly is needed at high speeds for a few seconds, the car blows out.

they could use just gas, or maybe not, if you enable something like that, up to 40km/h, or to a lower speed.
You have no idea what you are talking about pertaining to the hybrid AWD system.
 

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it doesn't take much to reach 40 in my car, if you are pushing hard to move out of not good road conditions, a few seconds, probably less than a minute. if a hybrid can't handle a minute or so of AWD ON because it will get toasted then I don't want a hybrid.

Depending on road conditions AWD, could be ON/OFF or ON for a while to handle the car in those conditions, if Hybrid can't handle AWD at low speeds what happens if suddenly is needed at high speeds for a few seconds, the car blows out.

they could use just gas, or maybe not, if you enable something like that, up to 40km/h, or to a lower speed.
Sorry, I'm just relaying the message I got from a previous post.

If your driving style doesn't fit the lack of the AWD-locking button, then yes, stick with the regular non-hybrid variant. No one is forcing you to buy the hybrid model. I'd love to have the locking mechanism but if it risks damaging the electric motor, I would rather not have that locking happen, which is what Toyota did.
 

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You have no idea what you are talking about pertaining to the hybrid AWD system.
Indeed, I just mentioned I don't understand it. it looks to be different to the "standard" AWD, not sure how the hybrid works. it was mentioned that in other forums they said that they don't want in a hybrid to apply traction to all wheels because it could toast the electric motor, hence they remove the button that locked in "4x4 lock" up to 40km/h as a safety measure.

traction control will "play" with the different wheels to keep the car steady, and you are basically in FWD unless the situation "demand" the system to switch to AWD, and power is redistributed.

But my concern was that it was mentioned that they didn't wanted power to be distributed to front and back at the same time for a period of time in order not to toast the electric motor, at least that's why I understood.
 

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Electric motors don't like to freely spin as they can be damaged. But yes all 4 wheels can be powered at the same time as needed as any awd system. The rear wheels will assist though, at any speed, up to the point of freely spinning. Which is wasted energy anyway. Any "lock" system would be only theoretical anyway since there is no physical connection between the engine and rear wheels. The rear wheels are solely powered by an electric motor and the traction battery.
 

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Electric motors don't like to freely spin as they can be damaged. But yes all 4 wheels can be powered at the same time as needed as any awd system. The rear wheels will assist though, at any speed, up to the point of freely spinning. Which is wasted energy anyway. Any "lock" system would be only theoretical anyway since there is no physical connection between the engine and rear wheels. The rear wheels are solely powered by an electric motor and the traction battery.
I guess that's the issue, as properly described in below site, which describes types of AWD systems, RAV4 uses the Full time AWD on demand type, the mentioned button, just forced it to Full Time AWD, so both axles will have some torque at all times, the proportion will depend on conditions, and it seems that's not a good set for hybrid in the sense that the system will remain like that until you remove it or reach 40km/h

https://carsintrend.com/awd-transmission-types/
 

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For the gas-only model Rav4 you're correct but in the hybrid there is literally no way for the ICE to mechanically power the rear wheels as there's no drive shaft linking the ICE to the rear axle (no transfer case, either) as has been explained above. The gas-only model acts as a traditional AWD even down to the "Lock" button to send 50/50 power to the front and rear axles. In the hybrid, the ICE and MG2 work to power the front axle while the sole power source for the rear axle is a 67HP electric motor called MGR.
 

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In the hybrid, the ICE and MG2 work to power the front axle while the sole power source for the rear axle is a 67HP electric motor called MGR.
I got all that, and BTW, thanks for the videos, as mentioned in those, both front or rear axles could be powered at the same time, they show the start from a light in a snowed road and uphill. The button in the gas just established that instead of on demand, to do it by command, as if you were going up a hill in the video. I was just pointing out that it seems they don't want the MGR running on command at any point, just on demand.

BTW, has anyone experimented or drive long enough a hybrid to see how it compares to have the MGR in control of rear axle to let's call it standard gas AWD. it's indeed a better control as it's claimed
 

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I got all that, and BTW, thanks for the videos, as mentioned in those, both front or rear axles could be powered at the same time, they show the start from a light in a snowed road and uphill. The button in the gas just established that instead of on demand, to do it by command, as if you were going up a hill in the video. I was just pointing out that it seems they don't want the MGR running on command at any point, just on demand.

BTW, has anyone experimented or drive long enough a hybrid to see how it compares to have the MGR in control of rear axle to let's call it standard gas AWD. it's indeed a better control as it's claimed
Are you suggesting from your reading that the AWD in the Hybrid could be better? How so?

Sounds like most people here think the non-hybrid has a better system but it's still going to be better than a regular FWD SUV, especially with winter tires.
 
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