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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, 01 limited, 5spd, no traction control or ABS

Just wondering about the specifics,

Is there a front bias, like 60-40, like other awd cars, or is is 50-50 front back?

And are the diffs open or limited slip?
I know toyota is a fan of the open, so I presume they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
all three are open?

I dont know how it couse shift power, its just going to go to the easiest.
 

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By the way, did you realize that a Hummer has Open Diffs as well. The BIG difference there is that each wheel on that rig has sensors that will apply brake pressure individually so that torque is routed to the wheels that need it. Of course there is a whole lot more to the system on those things but we're not here for that.

This is only one thing in common I know but I tought it was an interesting tid-bit.

M.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The tragic flaw of open diffs, sending all power to a free spinning wheel is countered by just braking from sensors for ABS, its quite an awesome system.
 
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Marcutio said:
All the data available says its 50/50 split. For even power distribution. :?:

M.
That's what I was told too... 50/50 front/back. When I was RAV4-shopping back in 2004, that's what one of the sales guys told me. I took his word for it since.

It is the same 4WD that Toyota employs in the 4WD Highlander and AWD Sienna (and even the 4Runner V8, but NOT the V6, which has a manual transfer case). From what I have read, the Matrix 4WD uses a front-biased system, similar to Honda's front-biased RealTime 4WD.

My dad has a 2000 CR-V, manual. I can tell that, with the 50/50 4WD setup, the RAV4 handles slightly better than the front-biased 4WD CR-V, or maybe it's just a self-fulfilling prophecy. :lol: I'm no professional driver or anything, but it feels like the RAV4 has a better "grip" of the road, or maybe I'm just imagining things. :p
 

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Definetely more confidence on the road in a RAV. It is 50/50 split, I read it also on the Popular mechanics site and in reviews as well.

Subaru and many others are front bias systems that transfer when needed more in the rear but the RAV is definetely 50/50.

Snow the other day.......Man I love to rip-it-up in the snow. The RAV will handle whatever you throw at it. I push mine quite a bit and believe me I've put it through some pretty tough stuff. A CRV is more of a "Grocery Getter". It switches back and forth from full FWD to a little bit of a 4WD so quick that you can't really predict when or for how long you will have the extra traction back there.

I'm not a fan and in-fact I talked my friend into buying a new 4.3 just the other day. One more new member coming soon.

Later. M.
 
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50/50 4WD = recipe for premature clutch wear???

Marcutio said:
Definetely more confidence on the road in a RAV. It is 50/50 split, I read it also on the Popular mechanics site and in reviews as well.

Subaru and many others are front bias systems that transfer when needed more in the rear but the RAV is definetely 50/50.

Snow the other day.......Man I love to rip-it-up in the snow. The RAV will handle whatever you throw at it. I push mine quite a bit and believe me I've put it through some pretty tough stuff. A CRV is more of a "Grocery Getter". It switches back and forth from full FWD to a little bit of a 4WD so quick that you can't really predict when or for how long you will have the extra traction back there.

I'm not a fan and in-fact I talked my friend into buying a new 4.3 just the other day. One more new member coming soon.

Later. M.
I have a question about the 50/50 4WD system, though. Because it is a fixed 50/50 system that does not transfer between front and rear axles, does it put extra wear on the clutch? I don't purposely ride the clutch or peel out or anything, but I've noticed, occasionally, that I inadvertently slip the clutch when I start up, especially when I give it a little too much gas. Whereas a normal FWD, RWD or "biased" 4WD system would allow the wheels to spin, because the RAV4 is 50/50, it doesn't have enough tourque to spin the wheels, unless you are on a gravel road, on ice or a really wet road. I sometimes feel a shudder when the clutch slips, which makes me cringe! :cry:

Unfortuantely, it hasn't snowed in Vancouver often enough for me to take advantage of the RAV4's 4WD system in the snow. Everybody has told me that ripping up snow in a RAV4 is fun. I do, however, have had a chance to drive on some really rough gravel roads on my RAV4. One word - AWESOME. The only downside was that I had to pull over for the 4Runners to pass me. :lol: It has just enough power to get me up steep gravel roads and the suspension is a good balance between everyday driving and rough roads. The 4WD system is definitely an awesome finish to an already awesome vehicle.

I can't wait till the summer comes so I can do some gravel-roading with my RAV4. Unfortunately, one of the roads that I want to try is busier than before because of construction for the 2010 Winter Olympics (the road to the Callaghan Valley, for those who know what I'm talking about).

Those 4.3 RAV4s... they just look awesome. I see more and more of them on the road everyday. I saw one up close last weekend. One word: WICKED. Will I buy one? Well, given that I just bought one a year and a half ago, I think I'll wait a while before I buy my next vehicle. :)
 

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Marcutio said:
Subaru and many others are front bias systems that transfer when needed more in the rear but the RAV is definetely 50/50.
Only one of Subaru's AWD systems is front-biased. All five-speed manual Subarus use a 50/50 torque split, and automatic models with VTD are actually rear-biased (45/55) by default.
 

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The RAV (01-05) WILL transfer torque front and back as needed due to the "open Differentials". This will give you more torque up fornt when you need it or in the back depending on the application. The wear on the clutch..... Can't tell you. I'd say it would be fine, dont' worry about it. Clutches wear anyway so its hard to say how much quicker in a RAV than another vehicle.


Subaru / Audi I think I had them mixed-up. "B" I'll take you word for it.


I drove a RAV 4.3 the otherday. Check out the post where I give it my 2cents. Liked it and disliked it, hang on to see why.

Later. M.
 
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Marcutio said:
The RAV (01-05) WILL transfer torque front and back as needed due to the "open Differentials". This will give you more torque up fornt when you need it or in the back depending on the application. The wear on the clutch..... Can't tell you. I'd say it would be fine, dont' worry about it. Clutches wear anyway so its hard to say how much quicker in a RAV than another vehicle.


Subaru / Audi I think I had them mixed-up. "B" I'll take you word for it.


I drove a RAV 4.3 the otherday. Check out the post where I give it my 2cents. Liked it and disliked it, hang on to see why.

Later. M.
Thank you for the open differential explanation. So, even though it is 50/50 at the best of times, it will shift tourque between front and rear as needed... understood. It sounds similar to BMW's xDrive AWD system... starts as 50/50, but it will also shift between front and rear. However, unlike the RAV4, BMWs can also shift from left to right.

I'm just a little conscious about clutch wear because, sometimes, I do feel my RAV4 shudder a little when I give it a little too much gas without the clutch fully engaged. In addition, I wore out the clutch in my old 1995 Tercel at only 83000 Km, but that's because I learned to drive manual on it back in the day. :roll:

Know what? The 4.2 RAV4's 4WD setup must have been state-of-the-art, and continues to be. "State-of-the-art" may be a bit of a hyperbole, but from the theoretical explanation of how it works, it sure beats heavily-front-biased Honda's RealTime 4WD.

(OK, another reason to hang on to my 2004 for a few more years, if not MORE than just a few years. :p)

[I'll read your post about the 4.3. Speaking of the 4.3s, they're popping up on Vancouver streets like mushrooms after a rainstorm (which is a fitting statement, given our recent rainstoms :lol:). So far, they're driven by a whole cross-section of our population: macho guys, family guys, young women, etc.]
 
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My '03 RAV had a weird gear noise at a few hundred miles that resulted in the dealer replacing the center differential and transmission (auto). The mechanic allowed me to look at the removed transmission and center differential. The transmission had a hollow splined shaft that slid into the center differential and drove the ring gear. The right side axle slid through the hollow splined shaft, through the center differential and into the transmission.

So normally, the transmission rotates the ring gear in the center differential, that turns the pinion gear that is connected to the driveshaft to power the rear differential. 50/50.

If one FRONT wheel starts to spin, the viscous coupler in the center differential notices the difference in front and back wheel speeds and begins to lock up, trying to make the speeds match. Supposedly, the magic fluid (silicone?) in the center differential makes this happen. It works the opposite of a clutch type positive traction unit that is locked up initially and then unlocks when making turns.

If I floor my RAV on packed snow or ice, I can feel the slight bump that occurs after the front wheel begins to spin and the center diff transfers power to the rear. It happens quickly. A person outside the vehicle can see it happen if they pay close attention.

It has worked well for three years, and never even spins unless I force it. My '03 model has no ABS or any traction assist. I'm old. As a kid in the late fifties, I learned the trick that when one wheel is spinning freely to lightly apply brakes to send some torque to the not spinning wheel. Now it's done with sensors and ABS.

My '03 automatic, with the right front wheel off the ground, will merrily spin that one wheel at idle and just sit there. So does my neighbor's. Evidently, at idle, the viscous coupler in the center differential doesn't lock up enough to move the vehicle. A newer RAV with traction assist might behave differently, so don't try this at home!
 
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