Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

81 - 100 of 130 Posts

·
Registered
First toyotas...'20 Rav4 xse Hybrid and '20 Highlander Limited
Joined
·
5 Posts
I’d much rather not have gloss black lower trim. I still don’t know what Toyota was thinking with trying to make the RAV4 look like a Camry with this trim. It’s an SUV, not a sporty car.
The 219 hp puts it in the 0-60 mph in the 6-7 sec range. Atkinson cycle engine is poor on acceleration but the instant torque of the electric motor plus new takeoff gear in the CVT gives it the kick of a supercharger.Actually fun to drive.

Black trim and wheels looks sporty to me.....and evidently a few others because I have had others comment on the looks in parking lots.

DSCN1016.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
The 219 hp puts it in the 0-60 mph in the 6-7 sec range. Atkinson cycle engine is poor on acceleration but the instant torque of the electric motor plus new takeoff gear in the CVT gives it the kick of a supercharger.Actually fun to drive.

Black trim and wheels looks sporty to me.....and evidently a few others because I have had others comment on the looks in parking lots.

View attachment 155113
Don't get me wrong; it looks great! When I think of SUV though I think of rugged utilitarian. To each his/her own. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
That's interesting, but I don't think it applies to the hybrids, does it?
No. They have electric motors for launching. Also, the eCVT in a hybrid has absolutely nothing to do with the belt and pulley CVT like in this video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Are the CVTs in the Hybrid require any kind of maintenance in the future? I took this with a grain of salt, but our sales guy told me the CVT in the RAV4 Hybrid has only 17 moving parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
Are the CVTs in the Hybrid require any kind of maintenance in the future? I took this with a grain of salt, but our sales guy told me the CVT in the RAV4 Hybrid has only 17 moving parts.
Toyota claims they don't need anything (as long as you're not towing, etc). Then again, all manufacturers claim that about their transmissions. It's still a good idea to periodically change the fluid anyway. But I will say this: if there's any transmission that wouldn't need maintenance, it's the one in a Toyota hybrid.

I don't know if the 17 moving parts number is precisely correct, but it's probably very close. This video dissects a Prius transmission (the RAV4's is a similar design, but larger), and you can see just how simple it is:


The belt on a CVT alone has hundreds of moving parts:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
77 Posts
Yesterday I was at a Toyota dealer in Culver City, CA. They had a gray XSE Premium on the showroom floor. MSRP was $50,XXX. They added an additional sticker showing a markup. Asking price was $75,000! Anybody who can buy these at MSRP is getting a great deal. I didn't think it would be possible to buy at MSRP. Congrats to Russ C, hopes 2, and others who bought these at MSRP.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hopes2

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Toyota developed the Ecvt which is way different from a Belt drive CVT.
They have been using it in the Prius for years. A lot of other car company's
licensed the Tech such as Ford and Chrysler use's it in the Pacifica Hybrid.
I would trust it way more than the Belt drive design. Anything that wears will
wear out. Good idea to change fluids once in awhile to maximize the lifespan
of anything that rubs.

For 75k you could buy a Model Y performance with all the options they offer.
I guess 75 k is toyota's version of Ludicrous mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Just checked with the Toyota dealer in Austin. Adding $5000 markup! Tried to tell me the dealer doesn't control the mark up! Wow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Yesterday I was at a Toyota dealer in Culver City, CA. They had a gray XSE Premium on the showroom floor. MSRP was $50,XXX. They added an additional sticker showing a markup. Asking price was $75,000! Anybody who can buy these at MSRP is getting a great deal. I didn't think it would be possible to buy at MSRP. Congrats to Russ C, hopes 2, and others who bought these at MSRP.
I have to congratulate the honest dealers out there, and hope the all the ADM's go out of business.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
77 Posts
I have to congratulate the honest dealers out there, and hope the all the ADM's go out of business.
When I bought my R4LH in January this same dealer asked $5000 above MSRP for the Limited Hybrid. I walked out without even trying to negotiate. I paid MSRP a few miles away. It was the first time I ever paid MSRP for a car. MSRP was the going rate in Southern California at the time. I assume you can get a much better deal now. Except on the Prime.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hopes2

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
When I bought my R4LH in January this same dealer asked $5000 above MSRP for the Limited Hybrid. I walked out without even trying to negotiate. I paid MSRP a few miles away. It was the first time I ever paid MSRP for a car. MSRP was the going rate in Southern California at the time. I assume you can get a much better deal now. Except on the Prime.
They are still not negotiating at all on those due to lack of inventory.
 

·
Registered
First toyotas...'20 Rav4 xse Hybrid and '20 Highlander Limited
Joined
·
5 Posts
No. They have electric motors for launching. Also, the eCVT in a hybrid has absolutely nothing to do with the belt and pulley CVT like in this video.
All CVTs use a drive belt with pulleys.
The addition of a launch gear in all Toyota CVTs applies to the '19+ Hybrids as well as other non Hybrid and other models which are equipped with a 6 speed manual option on their standard automatic CVT tranny. Just like the non Hybrid ICE motor, the electric motor (in tandem with the coaxial clutched in ICE if necessary) engages the launch gear for faster response than it would otherwise have in previous trannys without the launch gear. In addition to the launch gear is the reduction angle of the metal V drive belt for faster operation. Described in link below.

Total gain in gas mileage savings is not all in the transmission, generators and regenerative braking, but in difference in control of the ICE. The non hybrid ICE use the Otto cycle where the resistance of the piston is identical on all 4 strokes.....hybrids use the ECU to simulate an Atkinson cycle where resistance is reduced on the compression stroke by leaving the intake valve open for the initial portion of the stroke (and gas in the manifold recovered during the next stroke).The reduced resistance in conjunction using this with the regenerative braking recovered electricity is how it can get 40+mpg as compared to lower mpg of other brand hybrids using the Otto cycle on their ICEs. Reduced load in operation of an ICE using the Atkinson cycle produces better gas mileage at the same hp output, but a lag on acceleration - exactly the reason why it is perfectly suited and used in the Toy's hybrid which kicks in the electric with much greater torque than an ICE when acceleration is called for......sort of like a turbo charger....actually more like a supercharger since there full torque available at starting rpm with no turbo lag. That along with the launch gear is what accounts for the punch on acceleration and reduced 6-7 sec. 0-60 mph timing over older Ravs. Punch the accelerator at 70+ mph and it moves out instantly, actually a little scary since there is no normally associated dropping gears in the CVT.....smooth instant constant acceleration more like an airplane on takeoff. I can only imagine the greater kick out of the larger hp Prime.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
No belts in a Toyota Hybrid call it what you want
there are no belts . Weber has a lot of videos on this . See link
And the lag is way less smoothness of the whole thing is way better than
the subaru setup which does have a belt.
And the electric motors provide most of the low end torque.
This is not a gas car with a mechanical CVT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Let’s say you want to take your RAV4 Prime on a family trip total distance 500 miles. Doesn’t really matter the distance just more than 40 miles.

What happens if you can’t plug it in at all? I’m wondering will it operate just like the regular hybrid engine? Will the gas engine charge the battery in the car the same as the standard RAV4 hybrid?
if you never plug it in and operate in the option mode (electric and engine mode) Is this basically the exact same as the standard hybrid?

What I’m getting at is I understand on short trips you will be able to use pure electric power. I am just wondering how this works if you have to go on longer trips?
Supposedly it runs just like the hybrid but with a bigger battery and a charging end. Maybe bigger electric motor since the zero to 60 is faster and I think towing capacity is higher. Maybe has Adventure undercarriage since towing capacity is higher
 
81 - 100 of 130 Posts
Top