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Discussion Starter #1
Same question here: what is considered "extended"?

Here's the quote from the owner's manual:

Breaking in your new Toyota
To extend the life of the vehicle, observing the following precautions is recommended:
-For the first 200 miles (300 km): Avoid sudden stops.
-For the first 500 miles (800 km): Do not tow a trailer.
-For the first 600 miles (1000 km):
-Do not drive at extremely high speeds.
-Avoid sudden acceleration.
-Do not drive continuously in low gears.
-Do not drive at a constant speed for extended periods.


Just bought a 2017 RAV4 LE with only 57 miles on ODO. We have a trip planned next week to visit family for Thanksgiving in Arizona (I live in SoCal) 466 miles or 7 hours one way. Most of this will be freeway at same speed ~75-80 mph. Should I take another car instead? I had a 1989 Toyota Pickup that lasted me to 300k miles and I want this RAV4 to do the same.
 

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To me, extended periods is exactly like you are wanting to do, longer trips over say an hour at the same continuous speed. You could vary your speeds some, but to hold 75-80 for long periods of time would be a bad idea in my opinion.
 

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The first 600 miles are critical for proper engine break-in. Constant speeds on the highway during this time can cause uneven wear patterns on the rings and cylinder walls. It's best to avoid anything but short (5-10 miles at a time) highway speeds and just take secondary roads with lots of varying speeds and loads. Why don't you plan your trip by way of secondary state roads which take more scenic routes and avoid the super-slab till it's properly broken in.
 
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Oh c'mon people nobody follows any break in limitations anymore. Maybe it mattered 50 years ago but not on today's engines & transmissions, especially Japanese ones.
 

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So at 601 miles odometer reading the above described scenario would be OK?
I seriously doubt it's an exact science. I've read articles written by gear heads saying break a motor in hard and it lasts longer. I've always just remembered, don't wind it over around 4000 or so, take it easy and warm it up well, and vary speeds when you can for around 1000 miles. This is my 5th brand new Toyota without a fail yet, but I get tired of them before I can wear the damn things out LOL.
 

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Oh c'mon people nobody follows any break in limitations anymore. Maybe it mattered 50 years ago but not on today's engines & transmissions, especially Japanese ones.
My question to you would be, why wouldn't you want to break it in even if it could only possibly help? Some motors last 200K and some 300K+ and this is one potential reason to explain that (obviously among other things as well).
 

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Don't think about it too much.

Just remember no jumping or drag racing....but only for the first 600 miles.

After that, go for it.
 

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Oh c'mon people nobody follows any break in limitations anymore. Maybe it mattered 50 years ago but not on today's engines & transmissions, especially Japanese ones.
I have to disagree. I always break in all my new engines - never a problem one. You would think manufactures would not put it in the manual is there was nothing to it.
 

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While proper break-in may not affect the longevity of the engine in modern cars and trucks, it can certainly affect their rate of oil usage between changes. I've seen several brand-new vehicles which used a quart or more between oil changes. In my case, I've had several new vehicles which had proper break-in driving procedures done and they've never used oil between changes. To me, this says a lot for following the manufacturer's break-in procedures. The old adage "drive 'em like you stole 'em" will frequently work fine for race-cars which get fluids changed every race but not so well for these appliance-like reliable Toyotas. Personally, I'd rather take it easy for a while when new and not have to worry about oil consumption - Ever...
 

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I'm certainly not recommending being stupid with a new car as in purposely trying to damage it's internals starting at 0 miles. And "drive 'em like you stole 'em" certainly fits into the DUMB category.
Neither after religiously following the break in restrictions should you feel "turned loose" to beat on its brakes at 201 miles or its engine & transmission at 601 miles.

In general most cars are driven from new the same way they are 1,000, 10,000 or 100,000 miles later with no issues attributable to how they were broken in.
 

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"Ohh come on people, nobody follows oil recommendations anymore! Just run it like normal until next oil change, and the 1 or 2 quarts left is plenty to lube your engine just fine"....
 

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"Ohh come on people, nobody follows oil recommendations anymore! Just run it like normal until next oil change, and the 1 or 2 quarts left is plenty to lube your engine just fine"....
Don't you just keep driving until the oil light comes on and then drive home?
 

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"Ohh come on people, nobody follows oil recommendations anymore! Just run it like normal until next oil change, and the 1 or 2 quarts left is plenty to lube your engine just fine"....
He, He! A good facetious post . . .:smile
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks everyone for your advice. I'm working to get up to 600 before next week by driving it around town as much as possible. Should be ready for the trip next week and I will be sure to take it easy and vary speeds and RPMs regularly throughout (no cruise control).
 

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This YouTube video is by "Engineering Explained". This channel owner is a graduated mechanical engineer with a passion for cars.

I enjoy all his videos because he usually explains his topics by describing all the physics and the formulas behind the engineering design. This video is a little different because rather than explaining the engineering, he bases his conclusion on the recommendation of several manufacturers.

 

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I was curious about this. I was confused because when I got the car on fill up was a range of 323, was like that for the first few fill ups, now it is at 359 on a fill up what goes on with that?
 

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I was curious about this. I was confused because when I got the car on fill up was a range of 323, was like that for the first few fill ups, now it is at 359 on a fill up what goes on with that?
The miles are calculated off of your average mpg. So if your mpg's goes up, then your miles to empty increases.



 
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