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I have a Sport V6 and I just want to know, is it alright to drive at 100km/h (60mph) within the break in period? cause my instruction book didn't say what speeds are recommended
 

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The owner's manual doesn't mention break-in speeds because there is no "speed limit" for break-in. I'd tell you what it says if my fiancee were here now (she just bought a Limited V6 4x4), but I don't have access to her owner's manual right now. I do recall that the manual says to "vary your speed" during the break-in period., though.
 
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the dealership told me the break in period is the first 600 miles. he said not to use the cruise control as the car needs go on different rpms, and DON'T floor it. yea, that's about it. he said i can drive 80mph if i wanted to...hope that helps a little.
 

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From page 277 of the manual:

For the first 1600 km:
- Avoid full throttle acceleration when starting and driving
- Avoid racing the engine
- Try to avoid hard stops during the first 300 km
- Do not drive for a long time at any single speed, either fast or slow
- So not tow a trailer during the first 800 km
 

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people... don't really worry too much about break in.. Do you realize HOW people never even OPEN the owners manual or know whaqt a break in period is or even care what it is???? They drive th ecar they way they want from day one and do not have any more issues that the rest of us who adhere to break in miles .. I personally know people who don't change their oil, beat the crap out of their new cars from day one and they still go 150k miles.. I really do not it means as much as its made out to be..
 
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Worried about break-in myself, I read all the differing and frequently conflicting opinions. The suggestion to drive slowly, not accelerate suddenly or brake suddenly is particularly funny for someone who, like me, has to face New Jersey traffic every day. Just try to drive under 70 mph on Route 287 in central Jersey. Or try to merge gradually onto the highway without getting rear-ended by a tractor trailer. And try to avoid hitting your brakes when some idiot cuts you off on the highway with hardly an inch to spare. You do what you can do to take it easy but we live in the real world, after all. Taking it easy on a car doesn't do a lot of good if you wind up without front and rear bumpers.
 

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I always pay attention to the break-in instructions. The manufacturer puts them in there for a reason, after all. It's a relatively short period of time and not too much of an inconvenience to do what the manual recommends. Even less of one now, I see, since on older Toyotas it actually told you to keep your speed under 88 km/h (55 mph) the whole time - now that was a pain.
 

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Break in periods for new cars now is not as restrictive as it was in the old days. The new engines are built to a tighter torlarance and requires less break in time. The way I break in my new cars are: no jack rabbit starts, vary the RPM and dont let the RPM get close to the red line for the first 500 miles, which is what the manufacturer recommands.
 

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An interesting point here is that I been doing some research on the best way to break in a new engine. I found 2 or 3 articles that states: The best way to break in a new engine is to run it hard for the first 40 miles or so. This will ensure you get a tight seal on your piston rings. They recommand accelerating your car to high speed fast and then breaking fast to slow it down. Of course they recommand you do this at a race way or on a dyno and not on the street. They go on to explain further how the engine's compression is what seals the piston rings and not the spring loaded action of ring that does that, the article made alot of sense, but i could never do that to my new car. Just wondering if this is something that Toyota would do at the factory before shipping its new engines. Anyone know how Toyota test and break in their new engines?
 
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I work in assembly at Toyota's Georgetown plant. All the engines are ran through a dianostics test in power train before being sent to assemby. Sorry, but I don't know the details of these tests. The cars are started and driven off the end of the final line straight to functional. In functional the cars are driven on to a big roll drum. The roll drum turns allowing the car to be driven with out actually moving forward. The vehicle's functions and instruments are tested against what the roll drum says the car is doing. I don't drive the cars for this testing but, I can tell you they really rev them up on those roll drums. You can hear those engines scream for several minutes while there on those drums. I'm sure our RAV's have gone through simular tests.

MikeyJo
 

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Thank for that info MikeyJo, very good information. Sounds like Toyota have done this piston ring seal break in procedure for us already so we can take it easy during our break in period. Do you know how long they keep a car on that roll drum?
 
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Can't say for sure but about 2 minutes. I wouldn't call it a break-in but after the way they run the rpms up on the roll drum, I don't think your average driver is gonna hurt an engine.
 

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Harold said:
From page 277 of the manual:

For the first 1600 km:
- Avoid full throttle acceleration when starting and driving
- Avoid racing the engine
- Try to avoid hard stops during the first 300 km
- Do not drive for a long time at any single speed, either fast or slow
- So not tow a trailer during the first 800 km
So much for my dealer claiming than RAV4 requires no break-in and that I can tow my boat from day 1. I often wonder that one has to be a total idiot to gain employment at a dealership.
 

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MikeyJo said:
I work in assembly at Toyota's Georgetown plant. All the engines are ran through a dianostics test in power train before being sent to assemby. Sorry, but I don't know the details of these tests. The cars are started and driven off the end of the final line straight to functional. In functional the cars are driven on to a big roll drum. The roll drum turns allowing the car to be driven with out actually moving forward. The vehicle's functions and instruments are tested against what the roll drum says the car is doing. I don't drive the cars for this testing but, I can tell you they really rev them up on those roll drums. You can hear those engines scream for several minutes while there on those drums. I'm sure our RAV's have gone through simular tests.

MikeyJo
This is a very good info, explains why the new cars are partially breaked-in. Do we know if oil is changed at the factory after that piston ring seat-in procedure?
 
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Break in

One of my colleagues who races cars and assembles his own engines gave me these tips:

1. When driving home from the dealership dont take the freeway (might not be possible for everyone here - was possible for me). Let the first 100 odd miles have extremely varying rpms which will be natural if you take the city route.

2. As the manual states, no hard stops, no hauling, no reving, no 'red rpms'

3. Change oil after the first 400-500 miles (my dealership did this for free although I didnt sign up for free oil change program).

He also mentioned that break-in period is not as important these days and that it would have little to no impact on the performance. Regular oil changes and mainenance mean a whole lot more than care during break-in.
 

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I'm with flyingn. If the break-in period were so important, it would not be buried on page 277 of the manual. It would be a sticker on the steering wheel with bright colors and warning signs.
 
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I race and I build my own engines. I break my new engines in a total of less than 30 minutes before racing. There is no babying involved. It's wide open right from the start. Have never had an engine that had any problems due to "break-in". I've always been told to break it in like you are going to drive it. So mine get broken in "WIDE OPEN".

That being said, the tolerances and internal finishes(machining) on the newer engine of the more quality vehicles(Toyota, Honda, etc) is such that they just don't need to seat the rings and all that stuff that had to be done years ago. I personally think it's just a matter of not getting them too hot and creating some sort of scuffing or glazing of the cylinder walls. I have been using synthetis oil in our new vehicles for years right from the start with no issues and I will do the same with our new RAV4. I do follow the guidlines that the manufacturers set. I trust them to know what's best for the engine(and brakes....and transmission). It only takes a couple of tanks of gas to go thru the break-in..... After that we just drive as normal. Just my opinons...nothing more.
 
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