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Actually, free L2 public chargers tend to be 6.6KW. Higher On-Board Charger is a good thing. Also, your next car is likely a full EV and you will likely get 240v installed then.
it is a $50k car, I won’t be able to afford food for the next 20 years. :D Wife doesn’t want to wait for BEV. But her commute is only 20km each way, so I am hoping 100% EV most of the time. Hopefully the range wouldn’t degradate too much over the 20 years.
 

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I'm not sure where you seen that the Canadian models don't get a Power lift gate, because they are available on XSE and XSE+ in Canada. What the Canadian models don't have is TPMS.

I also heard that RSA might not work in Canada. I have yet to confirm this.

dp
 

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I'm going to assume that the Canadian models get 6.6KW onboard charger because of our climate. If you are in a cold climate and have to pre-heat/condition the battery and heat up the cabin before a scheduled departure, there is not much headroom left on a 3.3KW charger to actually charge the battery. If your L2 charger can supply it, 6.6KW is much more able to supply all the extra demands from cold climate and also charge battery at a reasonable rate.

I would like to hear from our friends across the pond in the Scandinavian Countries, if their models also all come with the 6.6kw onboard charger.

dp
 

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I'm not sure where you seen that the Canadian models don't get a Power lift gate, because they are available on XSE and XSE+ in Canada. What the Canadian models don't have is TPMS.

I also heard that RSA might not work in Canada. I have yet to confirm this.

dp
I think he meant Canadian Prime SE has no power liftgate vs the USA counterpart (SE)

POWER LIFTGATE can be upgraded with aftermarket for around $1000 cad, where the 6.6kw charger can’t be upgraded at all. Looks like a pretty good trade for Canadians.
 

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I think he meant Canadian Prime SE has no power liftgate vs the USA counterpart (SE)

POWER LIFTGATE can be upgraded with aftermarket for around $1000 cad, where the 6.6kw charger can’t be upgraded at all. Looks like a pretty good trade for Canadians.
Thanks for the clarification. I was not even aware that US SE had that option :geek:.

I suppose Toyota had to cut down on costs to keep the Canadian SE model under $45K in order for it to qualify for the iZEV incentives.

dp
 

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Thanks for the clarification. I was not even aware that US SE had that option :geek:.

I suppose Toyota had to cut down on costs to keep the Canadian SE model under $45K in order for it to qualify for the iZEV incentives.

dp
Toyota totally did that to get around the iZEV limit. You can see the XSE doesn’t add a lot of stuff for $6500 and then there’s so much more value be had for another $5000 with the tech package.

In my mind either you go SE or XSE with Tech ( for the US folks XSE premium), that’s how they get us lol.

Back on topic, I don’t think it’s possible to upgrade to 6.6kw Charger, the labor alone wouldn’t be worth it.
 

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I'm not planning (Yet) to install L2 charger. I might if our Horse and carriage mentality of our provincial government actually catches up with all the other provinces with incentives. I have already prepared for getting 240v with OEM EVSE. That will more than likely suit me fine for the foreseeable future.

I agree about the SE vs XSE Tech dilemma. I wanted all Leather (Softex in this case) and my wife really wanted memory seats so... XSE Tech it is. Due to arrive in to my dealership next week. So I pick it up either late next week or early the week after 😁 🤞

dp
 

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I'm not sure where you seen that the Canadian models don't get a Power lift gate, because they are available on XSE and XSE+ in Canada. What the Canadian models don't have is TPMS.

I also heard that RSA might not work in Canada. I have yet to confirm this.

dp
Sorry, I meant the SE trim. 6.6kw charger, no power tailgate. The us SE got power tailgate, but 3.3kw charger for some reason.
 

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How come Canadian version only have 6.6kw charger, but no power back gate? Does 6.6kw makes a difference using 110v outlet?
No. the 6 kW charger only delivers 6 kW if it is being fed 240 volts from a circuit that supports 30 amps, like an RV Hookup connection. Some home 240 volt circuits for electric clothes dryers, electric cooking ranges, and electric water heaters "might" support 30 amps, but you would have to check. The 120 volt L1 charger that comes with the car is a 15 amp charger, and only delivers about 1,600 watts to the battery. Some public L2 chargers can deliver 30 to 40 amps, but not all of them: some are limited to 15~20 amps. If a public L2 charger is labelled "30 Amps", it can deliver 6 kilowatts, but if it isn't specifically labeled that way, it is probably only a 3 kW charger.

How you can tell, if the label on the charge station is unclear: When you plug in a Rav4 Prime with a dead traction battery to an L2 charger, if the car reports "2.5 (or maybe a little less) hours to Full Charge", you have a 30~40 amp L2 charger. If the car says "4.5 hours to full charge", that charger is only 15 amps and the best it can do is 3.5 kilowatts, even if the charger in the car is a 6 kw charger. If using the L1 charger that comes with the car, expect 9 hours to fully charge the battery. This isn't necessarily a bad thing: the slower you charge a lithium battery, the longer it will last.
 

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No. the 6 kW charger only delivers 6 kW if it is being fed 240 volts from a circuit that supports 30 amps, like an RV Hookup connection. Some home 240 volt circuits for electric clothes dryers, electric cooking ranges, and electric water heaters "might" support 30 amps, but you would have to check. The 120 volt L1 charger that comes with the car is a 15 amp charger, and only delivers about 1,600 watts to the battery. Some public L2 chargers can deliver 30 to 40 amps, but not all of them: some are limited to 15~20 amps. If a public L2 charger is labelled "30 Amps", it can deliver 6 kilowatts, but if it isn't specifically labeled that way, it is probably only a 3 kW charger.

How you can tell, if the label on the charge station is unclear: When you plug in a Rav4 Prime with a dead traction battery to an L2 charger, if the car reports "2.5 (or maybe a little less) hours to Full Charge", you have a 30~40 amp L2 charger. If the car says "4.5 hours to full charge", that charger is only 15 amps and the best it can do is 3.5 kilowatts, even if the charger in the car is a 6 kw charger. If using the L1 charger that comes with the car, expect 9 hours to fully charge the battery. This isn't necessarily a bad thing: the slower you charge a lithium battery, the longer it will last.
I'm fairly sure the OEM EVSE that comes with the Rav4 is actually only 12amps. (80% of a 15amp circuit)

dp
 

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I'm fairly sure the OEM EVSE that comes with the Rav4 is actually only 12amps. (80% of a 15amp circuit)

dp
I'd like to check the L1 charger that came with my Prius Prime, and see just how much power it draws. I'd need a line-splitter and an inductive ammeter, which I don't currently own, but maybe I can borrow one from an electrician friend I know. I wish the car itself would give more information about the rate of charge, other than how many hours remaining to full charge, and how miles of EV driving range are accumulating as the charge builds up. Volt/amps being delivered to the battery, or volt/amps coming into the charger, would be nice to know.
 

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I'd like to check the L1 charger that came with my Prius Prime, and see just how much power it draws. I'd need a line-splitter and an inductive ammeter, which I don't currently own, but maybe I can borrow one from an electrician friend I know. I wish the car itself would give more information about the rate of charge, other than how many hours remaining to full charge, and how miles of EV driving range are accumulating as the charge builds up. Volt/amps being delivered to the battery, or volt/amps coming into the charger, would be nice to know.
Does you utility give you hourly or 15-min breakdown of power usage in the home? You can probably tell from there. Otherwise, a kill AWatt will do.

 

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Lol, so pretty bad trade for me then. Probably won’t get level 2 charging installed
If you live in a home with a 240 volt electric outlet in the garage for use with an electric clothes dryer, you don't need to "install L2 charging". Go an Amazon and look for an L2 charger that has the same plug as your dryer connection, probably a NEMA 10-30. The charger is only $199. I've used one on my Prius Prime for 2 years. It's only 16 amps (3.6 kilowatts), instead of the 30 amps you can get a public L2 chargers, but you don't have to worry about it overloading the circuit.

If you want the full 30 amps that are needed to run a Rav4 Prime charger at the full 6 kilowatts, you would probably have to install a dedicated 50 amp line from the distribution panel in your home to a new NEMA 14-50, 240 volt/50 amp, 4 conductor outlet in your garage, like the one in your kitchen for running an electric cooking range. 30-amp L2 chargers with a NEMA 14-50 plug are also available for $360, but it's unlikely that you have a NEMA 14-50 outlet in your garage - I've only seen these in kitchens, for cooking ranges. I don't know what an electrician would charge to install one of these, but it would probably be several hundred dollars, and you would probably need to get a building permit, too.
 

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If you live in a home with a 240 volt electric outlet in the garage for use with an electric clothes dryer, you don't need to "install L2 charging". Go an Amazon and look for an L2 charger that has the same plug as your dryer connection, probably a NEMA 10-30. The charger is only $199. I've used one on my Prius Prime for 2 years. It's only 16 amps (3.6 kilowatts), instead of the 30 amps you can get a public L2 chargers, but you don't have to worry about it overloading the circuit.

If you want the full 30 amps that are needed to run a Rav4 Prime charger at the full 6 kilowatts, you would probably have to install a dedicated 50 amp line from the distribution panel in your home to a new NEMA 14-50, 240 volt/50 amp, 4 conductor outlet in your garage, like the one in your kitchen for running an electric cooking range. 30-amp L2 chargers with a NEMA 14-50 plug are also available for $360, but it's unlikely that you have a NEMA 14-50 outlet in your garage - I've only seen these in kitchens, for cooking ranges. I don't know what an electrician would charge to install one of these, but it would probably be several hundred dollars, and you would probably need to get a building permit, too.
Unfortunately, my dryer is in the basement. Weirdly, I also got one in the living room that is taped off.
 

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No. the 6 kW charger only delivers 6 kW if it is being fed 240 volts from a circuit that supports 30 amps, like an RV Hookup connection. Some home 240 volt circuits for electric clothes dryers, electric cooking ranges, and electric water heaters "might" support 30 amps, but you would have to check. The 120 volt L1 charger that comes with the car is a 15 amp charger, and only delivers about 1,600 watts to the battery. Some public L2 chargers can deliver 30 to 40 amps, but not all of them: some are limited to 15~20 amps. If a public L2 charger is labelled "30 Amps", it can deliver 6 kilowatts, but if it isn't specifically labeled that way, it is probably only a 3 kW charger.

How you can tell, if the label on the charge station is unclear: When you plug in a Rav4 Prime with a dead traction battery to an L2 charger, if the car reports "2.5 (or maybe a little less) hours to Full Charge", you have a 30~40 amp L2 charger. If the car says "4.5 hours to full charge", that charger is only 15 amps and the best it can do is 3.5 kilowatts, even if the charger in the car is a 6 kw charger. If using the L1 charger that comes with the car, expect 9 hours to fully charge the battery. This isn't necessarily a bad thing: the slower you charge a lithium battery, the longer it will last.
Nice, at the very least, I can charge it in a public L2 charger faster if needed. Just realized the power gate can be added, so I guess good trade. :)
 

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Does you utility give you hourly or 15-min breakdown of power usage in the home? You can probably tell from there. Otherwise, a kill AWatt will do.

No. The monthly bill just shows how many kW-hours were used in each of the four rate periods: midnight to 6:00am, which is 9.5¢/kW-hr. 6:00am to Noon, which is 11¢/kW-hr. Noon to 5:00pm, which is 16¢/kW-hr. 5:00pm to 8:00pm, which is 30¢/kW-hr, and 8:00pm to midnight, which is 16¢/kW-hr.
 

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No. The monthly bill just shows how many kW-hours were used in each of the four rate periods: midnight to 6:00am, which is 9.5¢/kW-hr. 6:00am to Noon, which is 11¢/kW-hr. Noon to 5:00pm, which is 16¢/kW-hr. 5:00pm to 8:00pm, which is 30¢/kW-hr, and 8:00pm to midnight, which is 16¢/kW-hr.
My monthly bill also shows that. However, when I log on to the web site, I am able to see daily usage by week/day/hour/15-min. Does your utility have a website that you log into?
 

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My monthly bill also shows that. However, when I log on to the web site, I am able to see daily usage by week/day/hour/15-min. Does your utility have a website that you log into?
I just checked. My electric utility website can show my usage by:
1. total per month over the previous 12 months,
2. total per day during the current or any previous billing cycle (generally 30 days)
3. total per hour during the current day (24 hours) or any previous day, but not down to 15 minutes.

It shows a graph and as you pull the cursor along the graph, the number of kilowatt-hours, and the daily high temperature are displayed (I assume this is to point out how air conditioning use affects your electric bill in hot weather). Looking at the single-day graphs, I can actually see the power consumption suddenly jump from about 0.5 kw-hr at 11:00pm, to 4 kw-hr per hour between midnight and 2:00am, several days per month, and these are obviously days that I used my Prius Prime, and left it plugged in to charge at midnight when the rate is cheapest. Wow, that really works, and I can actually see the amount of power: the charger usually runs for 1 hour, occasionally 2 hours depending on how flat the battery was when the charge cycle started.
 
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