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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Changing 2GR-FE Spark Plugs and Ignition Coils with Pictures

I had changed all six original ignition coils in March of 2014 with Beck-Arnley coils, even though only one original was bad. Fast forward to two weeks ago, on the second day of my new job, my V6 decided to shut down on the freeway while driving. Luckily, I was able to coast over to the shoulder to avoid any accidents or jams. However, I still made it to work and back, pulled the scanner out and read all 6 coils were bad per the codes, which seemed weird that all would fail at once. So I pulled out the 6 B-A ones, put the 5 original and 1 B-A coils in last weekend, as well as new spark plugs. It drove fine for the week, but I still went ahead and bought 6 new Delphi ones because they have a 3-yr/36k miles warranty since the B-A only had a 1-yr/12k-miles warranty. After changing the coils out again this past weekend, the RAV seems smoother and normal.

Throughout this ordeal, I took a few pictures to document the process for anyone who wants to DIY. There are a few older posts as well.

Spark Plug Change 2007 V6-DIY- Not too complicated
DIY - How to Replace the #1 Ignition Coil on the 2GR-FE V6

There may be other methods of changing them out, but this is MY preferred method since I can quickly and easily do it now. I've added numbers to indicate the (rough) sequence that I had followed. Before that, I had disconnected the ground clamp from the battery.


  1. Loosen the clamps and hose to the airbox-throttle body junction.
    The junction can now be removed.
  2. Remove the various hoses. Note that the "Union to Check Valve Hose" is on the back of the intake manifold facing the firewall.
  3. Disconnect the "Intake Manifold Connector."
  4. Loosen the four (one not shown) 10mm throttle body bolts.
    The throttle body can now be removed from the intake manifold. Note there is an electrical connector to the throttle body, be careful.
  5. Remove the two 12mm bolts holding the intake manifold to two brackets.
  6. Remove the four 8mm hex bolts in the middle of the intake manifold.
  7. Remove the two 10mm nuts on either side of the intake manifold.
  8. Remove the one 12mm bolt holding down the bracket over coil #1.
  9. Disconnect the VVT sensor connector.
  10. Disconnect the six coil connectors and remove the six 10mm bolts.
    The tab on the coil connector is very fragile, I used a pick to gently lift it up while pulling it off the coil.







The spark plugs can be removed with a 16mm plug wrench and a 6-in extension in a counter-clockwise direction. Three of the six plugs were very tough to turn at first for me, so I was careful in keeping the ratchet and extension as straight as possible while turning. The 1-3-5 plugs are tough to remove with the ratchet and extension on the wrench due to the angle and firewall, so I used a magnetic picker to take it out.

Comparison of the old and new spark plug, with anti-seize applied on the threads.


Install the new spark plug by hand first, making sure it goes in properly, otherwise the threads may get stripped. Torque to 18 ft-lb.

Put everything back together and torque the nuts and bolts to the proper settings. I couldn't fit my torque wrench onto the three 12mm bolts facing the firewall, so I just tightened them down. Note the two yellow arrows pointing to the hoses, it's really important for the No.1 Ventilation Hose (larger one) to be properly connected.

 

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What an ordeal! I hope we never have to face this mess with two v-6 RAVs. If so I hope it occurs within extended warranty. Excellent post by the way.
 

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KTL,
I appreciate this and your other how-to posts. I did the coils on my V6 a couple of years ago and didn't really consider it an ordeal or difficult at all, just a little time consuming. But then I've had many engines out and rebuilt them and some automatic transmissions apart too. So this coil/spark plug replacement is pretty basic comparatively. I didn't run thru your links but I remember one saying the plenum didn't have to come off for clearance just for better visibility. Wish I'd known that earlier and alas now, hopefully I'll never need to know.

Tex,
I don't think you have any worries since the V6 '06s and some '07s are the only engines afflicted.
 

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Thanks for the excellent post and pictures, KTL! If you ever get a chance to look at a Nissan VQ30 V6, you would be amazed at how easy it is to change the coils and plugs. All you need is an 8mm nut driver for 5 of them. Number 5 (closest to the driver) required removal of 2 larger bolts to move a bracket that's in the way. I can change all 6 coils in 5 minutes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Dr. Dyno,
I wasn't too much annoyed by changing out the coils, more so that they failed so quickly and all at once. I just hope it's not an unknown problem that could arise later on. I enjoy working on my vehicles if I'm capable, but it usually has to wait until the weekends. So I actually had my OBD2 scanner in the RAV to clear those codes out whenever it died on the road for that week. I would've had it swapped out sooner had it not been for a new job.

JuneBug,
That's just...unfair. It sounds easier than when I have to change out the spark plugs and coils on an '05 RAV4 this weekend.
 

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Question, do I have to replace the Throttle Body Gasket?
I didn't review KTL's procedure but when I did my rear coils I didn't replace any gaskets but did remove the plenum. So either that means the throttle body gasket wasn't damaged or I didn't remove the TB from the plenum.
 

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Just had my 06 start sputtering and lose power as I was returning from camping in the middle of nowhere. Solid engine light started flashing a few minutes later. Luckily I was able to make it to the nearest auto parts store some 30 miles away to get a code read and find out that coil #5 was misfiring. It was a pain to get to behind the manifold but luckily I had all my tools under the cargo area...and enough cell reception to get to this site/page. It took 3 hours (and a good samaritan with a handy hex tool to take off 2 stubborn hex bolts) but this dude who had basically only changed a pcv valve and installed a strut bar up to this point got it done. Thanks @KTL, this rules.
 

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Fortunately I was near home the couple times when a coil failed. But by clearing the code I was able to temporarily get it to run smoothly for a short distance.
 

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Fortunately I was near home the couple times when a coil failed. But by clearing the code I was able to temporarily get it to run smoothly for a short distance.
Definitely going to keep a spare from now on. I knew from research this could be an issue but at 90k miles I was hoping the previous owner had gotten them replaced already. Also helps to have a headlamp handy when working in the back of the engine bay.
 

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Yeah, if I check my shelf I'd probably find a spare. I've replaced some of them twice since I could buy six eBay ones for the price of one from Toyota and the labor to me is just fun. At 145K all the rear replacements, which were speced for '07 models, have hung in there.
 
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