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I am not new to Toyota's had a 2003 Toyota corolla that I sold with 197,000 miles on it only thing I had done to it was brakes, rear bearings and oil changes. I noticed a few new 2019's and several used 2019 rav4's. Do they have any problems or issues? I was considering the newer ones because of the fuel economy. I currently drive a jeep patriot which gets about 21 to 23 mpg with the wind. I commute 80 miles a day most of it on the interstate at 80mph. How do they handle in the snow and wind? Anything to watch for if I decide to go used. I would like to get as much info as I can considering they run for $23,000 to $40,000 for one. I heard they had issues with their 8 speed transmissions, is that true?
Thanks
 

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For the most part the only problems with the 8spAT have been fixed with a software update TSB issued last summer, and not all of them were affected by it in the first place, mine and many others have never had the low speed lurch issue. The transmission isn't new, been in many other vehicles since 2013 including Lexus. Other major problems are the Dynamic Torque Vectoring rear driveline disconnect on the Adventure/Trail and Limited models. Spend some time reading in the 5th gen forum, there's a Defects sticky in the 4.5 General forum that covers everything. There's also a recall on '19s and '20s made in Canada during late 2019 that should be considered.

 

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Said goodby to Toyota last year after owning 3. Owned an 87 Camry wagon for 11 years and had zero major problems with it. The usual belts, batteries, pads and hoses and nothing else. Bought a 94 Camry and owned 10 years. Changed the radiator, alternator, power antenna twice, O2 senors and left and right front door handles. Figuring I couldn't get screwed twice I bought a 2006 RAV4. Power steering died twice. Never found the problem. Got the common steering wheel clunk. Toyota changed parts free but came back again 5 years later...no longer a free fix. Then it started eating oil. Learned about the free fix for Toyota's poorly designed piston heads late. Never fixed. Was burning a quart of oil every 700 miles. Soooooo...having my fill of Toyota we bought a 2019 VW Tiguan SEL last year for $26,250 out the door. Did test drive the new RAV4 and found the ride harsh and had to buy the high end model to get the options we wanted. Test drove several other SUVs but settled on the Tiguan as over all best option.
 

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IMO as a former Toyota fanboy, I’d make sure you shopped other brands, and most definitely used vs new generations of any vehicle. Do not go for a 2019 Rav as just looking at this forum reveals Toyota’s dwindling quality control/testing capabilities.
If you insist on a 5th Generation Rav, there’s the major warranty advantage of the 2020 model over the 2019 as well as the small improvements to consider.
That said, Toyota’s hybrid system works very well and reliably.
 

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Coming to this forum full of haters and the greek chorus of "Sky is Falling" is not a great way to learn about the RAV4. Good luck. I have offered my opinion on numerous posts like yours. My Adventure 2019 has been great. 19000 miles and no problems. Gas mileage around 30mpg, comfortable ventilated seats, handles great, looks fantastic, roomy and full of storage places. I would vote yes for you, but actual real world opinions based on your own experience are drowned out here by the cacophony of posters who regurgitate posts from long ago or state opinion as fact. Best wishes.
 

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I am sure you'd be part of the "haters" if you had problems with your vehicle; therefore, just leave it at that and stop insulting people and labeling them "haters". Even the sales manager who sold me a RAV4 lamented about Toyota's declining quality. He is probably another hater in your eyes...

Sent from my SM-A102U using Tapatalk
 

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quality always declines when a company gets bigger. Just the nature of the beast. You have less control of the quality of products at a large scale and changes are much harder to do.
 

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About the haters bit, it’s hilarious that a story of bad luck with a Camry over 10 years (!) and a single RAV concludes with running to VW. I’m sure it rides great and I hope you’re not posting surprised disappointment in the VW forums 5 years from now but odds are you will. (VWs are expensive to repair, their warranty is garbage and their newer electronics and sensors may not last, I and a couple of friends have first hand experience) I’m not saying a 2020 RAV will outlast the Tiguan. Look, we all have our own experiences and make our own decisions. Hating on something because of personal experience is 100% valid, but a sales manager is not to be believed, even when they’re hating on his own product. Sales doesn’t deal with repairs or service and they have high turnover. If he had that opinion it was 2nd hand. Look at more reliable sources to see how a manufacturer is doing. Eg JD Power, Consumer Reports etc
 

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Said goodby to Toyota last year after owning 3. Owned an 87 Camry wagon for 11 years and had zero major problems with it. The usual belts, batteries, pads and hoses and nothing else. Bought a 94 Camry and owned 10 years. Changed the radiator, alternator, power antenna twice, O2 senors and left and right front door handles. Figuring I couldn't get screwed twice I bought a 2006 RAV4. Power steering died twice. Never found the problem. Got the common steering wheel clunk. Toyota changed parts free but came back again 5 years later...no longer a free fix. Then it started eating oil. Learned about the free fix for Toyota's poorly designed piston heads late. Never fixed. Was burning a quart of oil every 700 miles. Soooooo...having my fill of Toyota we bought a 2019 VW Tiguan SEL last year for $26,250 out the door. Did test drive the new RAV4 and found the ride harsh and had to buy the high end model to get the options we wanted. Test drove several other SUVs but settled on the Tiguan as over all best option.
I like the inside and out of VW cars but I don't trust owning one beyond warranty period after having experience with Jetta where it was constantly in the shop with 90k miles. Your 06 rav4 managed to get to 200k + miles with just minor issues i would be curious how your Tiguan survives with same mileage.
 

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Coming to this forum full of haters and the greek chorus of "Sky is Falling" is not a great way to learn about the RAV4. Good luck. I have offered my opinion on numerous posts like yours. My Adventure 2019 has been great. 19000 miles and no problems. Gas mileage around 30mpg, comfortable ventilated seats, handles great, looks fantastic, roomy and full of storage places. I would vote yes for you, but actual real world opinions based on your own experience are drowned out here by the cacophony of posters who regurgitate posts from long ago or state opinion as fact. Best wishes.
Its important to note that (from what I can tell) most of the folks writing with complaints about 5th Gen Ravs have been Toyota fanboys up until the recent past. I know because I’m one of them. I’ve likely owned and enjoyed more Toyos (since 1987 including 3 hybrids) than you’ll ever own. I’ve NEVER needed to have any repair done to a Toyota, only maintenance.
We experienced fanboys are seeing the quality decline more clearly than many and simply have higher expectations than NEWBY buyers. I assure you, most of these complaints are recent and are definitely NOT regurgitations. So bottom line...BUYER BEWARE.
I‘m very glad to hear there are happy owners.
 

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How about waiting for a 2021? A lot of buyers wait for the design and production bugs to be worked out for new models. Third MY seems to be the sweet spot from what I read.
 

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How about waiting for a 2021? A lot of buyers wait for the design and production bugs to be worked out for new models. Third MY seems to be the sweet spot from what I read.
I could consider it, but with the value of my current vehicle dropping, and the average increase in prices in two years could be another $4000. Because I would probably have to wait to see if they come out with discounts in 2022. Who knows, they could make another huge change in 2021. But, Right now I am in the research stage.
 

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I know everyone cant afford a Lexus, but of course Lexus is built by Toyota and they seem to be more reliable and better built than Toyotas. Perhaps just better components or better engineers? My wife has had two Lexus and they both have been extremely reliable. I considered buying an RX but decided on the Rav4 instead (a good $10-15k less) and got the Limited with all the major options (tech and weather pkgs). I’ve not been disappointed in the vehicle but my overall customer satisfaction will hinge on whether my car gets recalled for the engine block issue and subsequently requires an engine swap.
 

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I just got a new 2020 RAV4 LE in December. My first experience is a bad battery (see this post). Other than that, I love it.

I didn't consider that all of my friends have RAV4s until after I bought the car.

What didn't I buy? Any Honda CR-V from 2017 on. Why? Google "CR-V oil gas dilution". I'd rather have an electrical system problem than mixing gas into the oil.
 

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I bought a 2020 rav4 le awd basically as soon as they were for sale. Dealer did try to stick me with a 2019 but i wanted a 2020.

I went with rav4 over the competition because i trust Toyota and i think the new rav4 looks amazing. Never been a fan of any suv before.
 

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^^^ Likewise, I had to steer the salesman to the 2020 models and bought it off the lot.

I should also mention that 2020 is the first year the RAV4 supports Android Auto. Prior years (2019) have supported Apple CarPlay, but the 2020 RAV4 has both.

I would have used Bluetooth, but having the cellphone fully integrated into the display is a big deal. Just install the Android Auto app on your cellphone and follow the car's install instructions. Nice.

Another difference between 2019 and 2020 is that the underside of the engine hood has a sound insulation blanket to calm down the road noise. My friend put his 2019 RAV4 next to mine and compared. The 2019 doesn't have the insulation blanket. I don't know how much of a difference it would make, as I didn't drive his car.
 

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My first vehicle was a 1969 Toyota Corona, bought used a couple years after that model year. I have spent most of my time since then -- but not always -- owning Toyotas. I'm now 63 years old, and whenever I've tried other brands, I've been pretty deeply disappointed. I've been used to just normal oil changes and minimal regular maintenance -- heck, I've never even changed the brakes on any Toyota I've owned. Compare this to a couple of Hondas I've owned, each of which I referred to as "the worst rattle-trap I've ever owned." I had a top-of-the-line 2004 Accord EX-L Coupe, and the interior was absolutely falling apart within 20,000 miles. And so on.

Moving forward to the present, you have to understand that things are very, very different on the Internet these days. Yes, "Toyota quality went down the toilet!", when in fact the 8-speed transmission issue was simply a computer program that dropped the transmission into 1st gear in some situations when 2nd gear would be far smoother for most people -- and Toyota issued a TSB that changed the program, so it dropped into 2nd gear instead of 1st gear. And so on. Just take whatever you read with a commensurate "grain of salt," and then seriously consider the competition. For instance, I can guarantee right now that I will go to my death bed without ever paying one penny for a vehicle with a turbocharged engine -- history has shown that, apparently, almost every turbo engine in consumer vehicles hasn't been designed from the beginning to be turbocharged, and turbo engine reliability has been miserable through the years. "Oh, that isn't true anymore," but consider the Honda 1.5 turbo engine, which has shown an issue with "gas getting into the oil." By all means, read up on that before buying a CR-V -- what I have read and heard, the issue isn't "oil getting into the gasoline," but rather, "gas is getting into the oil." So, how is that happening? Well, think about the gasoline system -- a fuel pump moves gasoline out of the gas tank, then into the fuel injection system. "No oil anywhere near that." So, then what happens? The fuel injectors inject fuel into the cylinders. And that's where unburned gasoline is getting out of the cylinders, and getting into the oil system. Does that have something to do with turbocharging? Since I haven't heard about a similar problem in previous non-turbocharged Honda engines, I think it might. "And so on."

I made a list of competitive vehicles when I started investigating the RAV4, which most definitely included "engines and transmissions." I dropped out every model with a turbo engine. And I dropped out every model with a CVT transmission. "And so on." Also -- by all means -- get out there and shop anything you might be interested in. For instance, I just attended our big "auto show," and one thing I've been doing for the past 20 or 30 years has been to "sit in the vehicles I'm interested in." I have certainly found that "Toyota seats tend to fit me well," while others either don't fit, or positively make you wonder if the manufacturer actually had any human beings sit in them and try them out, before ordering thousands of them. Hyundai and KIA have remained on the bottom of my list -- I can't even begin to comprehend what they're doing. Though, we have some talk in this forum about people finding the RAV4 seats uncomfortable -- but I get the gist that these people are significantly larger than I am -- I'm rather short. There is talk that their legs are always pressed up against the side of the console next to their right legs, but that's definitely no problem with me. Still, try it, and try some other seats.

Other things to consider are all of the safety features built into the RAV4, that Toyota is building into every one of its new models. And do some research into Toyota's "TNGA" architecture, wherein they are increasing commonality into their models, as compared to whether other competitors are thinking about stuff like that.

In the end, yes, there have been some issues, but some people have blown some things way out of proportion. Which is why I say "take it with a grain of salt." And always, "consider the competition" -- there are a lot of manufacturers that I wouldn't touch with a proverbial ten-foot pole. I've just spent a year with my 2019 RAV4 Limited AWD, and I'm very happy with it. I've had the 8-speed transmission issue improved via the TSB, which my dealership handled very well. I chose the "Advanced Technology Package," with the birds-eye-view camera system, the wireless phone charging, and so on, and I'm very happy with that. It's virtually the main reason that got me to start looking for a new vehicle. I didn't get the "Weather Package," but that turned out to be just fine from my perspective -- apparently the "heated and cooled seats" yield far less heat than the otherwise "just heated" seats, and I'm in a cold climate -- I value the heated seats as much as anything else in my RAV4.

So, keep doing more research, and most definitely, at least sit in any other vehicle you might consider. I have heard so many people over the years complain about the driver seat in their cars, but you know -- I can figure that out by sitting for one minute in a car at the auto show. Make sure you're happy with the driver seat and the driving position, and then move forward from there. That's certainly the most important thing to me!

Good luck!
 

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Toyota Planning Massive Changes to Its Trucks and SUVs, Report Claims


Info may have been posted, but reportedly the RAV4 will be refreshed in 2022. (no details)
I wouldn’t necessarily count on a refresh being preferable. You might not have noticed but the Korean car refreshes have forced pushing style from what was initially tastefully or interesting into over done. Toyota styling of the last 8 years has been over done and the 2019 really kind of brought the RAV4 out of the space age. We can only hope they continue with the more utility focus of this redesign. At least you’ll get to choose from a 2021 or the 2022.
 

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I wouldn’t necessarily count on a refresh being preferable. You might not have noticed but the Korean car refreshes have forced pushing style from what was initially tastefully or interesting into over done. Toyota styling of the last 8 years has been over done and the 2019 really kind of brought the RAV4 out of the space age. We can only hope they continue with the more utility focus of this redesign. At least you’ll get to choose from a 2021 or the 2022.
Considering that each of the last refreshes have been 3 years apart, 2022 is the next likely refresh year for the rav4...that also means 2021 should be the most reliable year of gen 5...
 
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