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Discussion Starter #1
Toyota engineering stupidity - apparently not making it possible to drain all of the cooling system, although at least one owner said that there is a drain valve located at the bottom of the engine block but it apparently is risky to use it as it may break off and then need to have the threaded part extracted from the engine block. Latest Toyota bulletin I saw some years ago said that the SLL and undiluted red coolants are compatible even though containing different types of corrosion inhibitor, but if mixing them the service life will be that of the undiluted red coolant (which should be diluted for use) rather than that of SLL variety. Another forum user may have more info.
 

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Thanks @myang001, but I ran it to operating temp each time I flushed so I am sure the thermostat opened. And agreed @Blogson really poor design. Thanks for the info on being able to mix the two different coolants.
 

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My standard procedure when flushing a cooling system is letting the engine idle with the radiator drain open and a garden hose flowing clean water in just fast enough so the radiator stays full. Run until draining water is clear. Then let the radiator drain. Refill radiator with concentrate full strength antifreeze. Since the radiator usually holds about half the total coolant I end up with approximately the desired 50% mix.
 

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Thanks @Dr. Dyno, all I can find in concentrate is the Pentofrost A1 or the Toyota Long Life. Any thoughts on those or do you have any other brands you recommend?

And I think I confirmed this but but I know the Red/concentrate is designed for older cars but should be find on the newer ones. But the Pink (50/50) should not be used on older cars. Do I have this right?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I seem to remember reading somewhere that the SLL (pink) coolant should not b used in older vehicles because of an incompatibility with water pump seals and other gasket and seals in the cooling system, but the red (concentrate) coolant is fine for newer vehicles. Also I have used the same drain and fill system as Dr. Dyno on previous vehicles to make certain that the entire system is flushed - make certain that the heater control is set on full warm.
 

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Thanks @Dr. Dyno, all I can find in concentrate is the Pentofrost A1 or the Toyota Long Life. Any thoughts on those or do you have any other brands you recommend?
And I think I confirmed this but but I know the Red/concentrate is designed for older cars but should be find on the newer ones. But the Pink (50/50) should not be used on older cars. Do I have this right?
If you're worried about compatibility, Toyota Long Life should fill the bill, no?
 

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As long as the coolant meets Toyota criteria which is mentioned in the owners manual then use that.
 

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The reason they don’t put the proper drain valves etc in the cooling systems is that they prefer to do it in a shop with a machine that flushes the system more efficiently. You can drain and flush as said above. However, if you use anti freeze concentrate, you need to mix it with distilled or deionized water and not tap water. The premixed products are supposed to have been made with deionized water. the reason for this is they don’t want impurity’s and minerals added to the coolant, which will cause corrosion in alloy heads and Blocks.

I do a lot of my own maintenance too, but when it comes to coolant and transmission flushes, i just take it in. It’s better, less messy and I don’t have to dispose of the old stuff.

Cheers
John
 

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For starters, Don't use the red "Zerex for Toyota" coolant in any car -- I was using it just to top-off for 10 years (only about a quart during that time) in a RAV that had only factory Red in it ever (only dealer-serviced previously) and when I went to change the coolant there were semi-hardened shards at the bottom of the reservoir and I noticed there was a salt that separated in the bottle of remaining coolant. I talked to Valvoline (the makers of Zerex now) and they said the coolant shelf life had expired -- never heard of that before. I had already purchased a new bottle of the Zerex (I was going to use both for the coolant change), and it had some weird looking floating particles in it that another poster on here also noticed. Just stay away from it. Coolant is the one fluid in a Toyota where I will [now] only use the factory-supplied product.

As far as mixing the 2 factory coolants, I was told by a dealer mechanic that (1) the Red can be added to a car that originally came with the Pink (the Super Long Life pre-diluted), but why go backwards unless you only can buy the Red. And (2) the Pink should never be added to a car that originally came with red unless 100% of the Red coolant is removed first.

Personally, I don't like tap water entering the cooling system, especially with the hard tap water where I live, for the sake of the thermostat and water pump seals and radiator. If I need to flush, I use distilled water (less than $1/gallon at Walmart), but when I drained the coolant on mine recently which previously had only been changed once in its life, the coolant came out a clear red -- still looking good after 10 years, so I didn't feel the need to flush. On 3S-FE engines, there's a coolant drain plug on the right side of the engine block (facing the firewall cos it's tranverse), so i could drain the block and then disconnected the heater hoses at one end to drain the core. Toyota discontinued engine block coolant drain plugs on RAV's sometime in the 2000's -- not sure why; how do you get the coolant out? -and how do you get the water out if you flush the system? On the Red coolant bottle, Toyota says to flush with water then add undiluted to give the approx. ratio to compensate for what's left in the block --not exactly scientific. I drained the system dry and added a precise 52/48 ratio mixing it like a chemist in a glass container :p (a bit of overkill); but I'm definitely glad I have the engine block drain bolt. .
 

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I followed this for both the 1991 Toyota pickup truck and '98 RAV4. Wouldn't have removed an engine-block coolant drain even if I had one-- for the risk you mentioned (frozen; breaking off). Just utilized radiator petcock. Drove around (in summer!) for 2-weeks w/ distilled water only in coolant system, to flush every last bit of old coolant out-- considering I was switching from green to Toyota Red. After driving long enough to get the engine hot, I'd return and drain out the dH2O, then add clean distilled water. I did this for 8-iterations over that 14-days. After that, installed Toyota RED. I calculated that after my 9th iteration, there was a potential of 0.0046% of the old green coolant remaining in the system. That was good enough tolerance for me:
 

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My standard procedure when flushing a cooling system is letting the engine idle with the radiator drain open and a garden hose flowing clean water in just fast enough so the radiator stays full. Run until draining water is clear. Then let the radiator drain. Refill radiator with concentrate full strength antifreeze. Since the radiator usually holds about half the total coolant I end up with approximately the desired 50% mix.
But then you have mineralized water in your cooling system and wouldn't it also be over-diluted? The radiator holds less than 40% of the coolant in the system. . :unsure:
 

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When I did mine: dH2O has no minerals. Also, my calculations allowed for distilled water remaining in system and adjusted amount of Toyota Red accordingly. The Notes I compiled reflect my meticulous measurements.
 

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But then you have mineralized water in your cooling system and wouldn't it also be over-diluted? The radiator holds less than 40% of the coolant in the system. . :unsure:
We don't have hard water so I've never been concerned with its quality. In our climate in Connecticut a 60/40 water/antifreeze, if that what it ends up being, provides protection to lower temperatures than we ever see.
 
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