Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I pulled my engine/transaxle on my 99 RAV4 4 door and I while it was out I did a total rebuild of the cooling system. My original radiator was badly clogged and the fins on the lower third were badly deteriorated, so I replaced it and the other following components:
Spectra Premium CU2292 Complete Radiator - Amazon.com
Motorad 2014-170 High Performance Thermostat - Amazon.com
2 ea - Upgr8 Universal High Performance 12V Slim Electric Cooling Radiator Fan With Fan Mounting Kit (14 Inch, Black) - Amazon.com
Gates TCKWP199BH Engine Timing Belt Kit with Water Pump - Amazon.com
Gates 19050 Heater Hose - Amazon.com
Gates 19051 Heater Hose - Amazon.com
Gates 22381 Lower Radiator Hose - Amazon.com
Gates 22382 Upper Radiator Hose - Amazon.com
Bypass hoses 1, 2, and 3 - local purchased
DNJ ENGINE COMPONENTS FPS907 Set; Freeze Plug, Brass; Freeze Plugs - Rock Auto

Oil system - while often not considered part of the cooling system, oil actually accounts for about a third of your engine cooling.
DNJ ENGINE COMPONENTS OP940, Oil Pump - Rock Auto
24K Gold Aluminum Oil Filter Relocation Male Fitting Adapter Kit 3/4X16 , 20X1.5 for Toyota MR2 - Amazon.com see link http://www.rav4world.com/forums/94-4-1-d-i-y-modifications/245369-installed-oil-filter-relocation-adapter-kit.html

A word of warning to prevent future corrosion problems I would highly recommend using a quality antifreeze mixed with distilled water at 70/30. Don't use tap or well water in a cooling system because of the metals and chemicals that can and will cause problems. Even if your coolant is rated at 5-years, replace it at least every two years, as coolant becomes acidic and therefore corrosive with age.

To aid in cooling and corrosion control, I performed the following on the block, heads, intake manifold, transmission:
Degreased
Washed with Dawn dishwashing detergent
Wire brushed
Wiped down with acetone
Wiped down with denatured alcohol
Primed with very high temperature primer
Painted with very high temperature paint
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Forgot the radiator cap.
Motorad ST-36 Safety Lever Radiator Cap - Amazon.com
I used 3/8" fuel line for the hoses going to the throttle body from the evap cannister
I also used 3/8" for the hose going to the back side of the heads, that runs just over the top of the fuel injectors.

The only thing I didn't replace was the heater core but someone that owned the RAV4 before me must have replaced it not too much before I bought it. I flushed it before I hooked it into my new system and the water was very clear right from the start, I rinsed it out with distilled water and hooked the heater hoses up.

Filled it with Prestone Anti-Freeze, 70% and 30% distilled water. I did not use extended life anti-freeze as it gets acidic after a few years and must be replaced anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
While working on everything I had a tragedy, something must have whacked the oil pressure sensor pretty good and broke the aluminum bit that it screws into in half (part of the head). Tried and true old method of repair that I've used several times in the past, JB Weld. It cracked when I screwed the sensor back in... twice. So I moved the sensor to the remote oil filter adapter and reapplied the JB Weld plugging the sensor hole. I had to cut the sensor wiring connector and wire it back in with a longer wire in order for it to reach.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #4

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Looks nice under the hood, very different from mine.
There are several things about those fans that would worry me.

Hope you are out having fun in it soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
It's getting there. I admire your no short cuts approach.

I do however have concerns about the fan mountings. I had the same on a special rad I had made for a supercharged engine, the fixings wore holes in the rad :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Code:
It's getting there. I admire your no short cuts approach.

I do however have concerns about the fan mountings. I had the same on a special rad I had made for a supercharged engine, the fixings wore holes in the rad :(
Thanks, I'll take a look at that and make a better mount, I'm a fair to middling fabricator so I'm sure I can cut a fan shroud out of aluminum and mount them to the shroud. I wasn't too fond of the way they mounted.

As far as the quality of the fans, they had good reviews, put out excellent air flow, are quieter than OEM, and I plan on upgrading them later when I have more funds. But, even if I have one fail, the other should keep me going till I get a replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Better mounting would help, but also watch your temp gauge in hot weather.
The stock fans pull between 9.1 to 11.1 amps, while your new ones are rated for 7.5 amps.
25% less power to the fans would make me nervous.

I understand the need to keep the cost down. But $60 or $70 for smaller fans you need to modify(and upgrade later) as opposed to $120 for the right drop in parts, seems like false economy. But that can be hard to see when the cost of the project is climbing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Uni
Better mounting would help, but also watch your temp gauge in hot weather.
The stock fans pull between 9.1 to 11.1 amps, while your new ones are rated for 7.5 amps.
25% less power to the fans would make me nervous.

I understand the need to keep the cost down. But $60 or $70 for smaller fans you need to modify(and upgrade later) as opposed to $120 for the right drop in parts, seems like false economy. But that can be hard to see when the cost of the project is climbing.
I understand the concern, a friend is using these same fans in a Nissan truck in south Florida for more than a year with no issues. I believe the fan blade style and size has a lot to do with it. These fans are not smaller, they are much larger, 14" vs 12". My blades are 5.3" vs 3.4" stock. Instead of 4 inefficient straight blades stock mine has 8 scythe blades. For example, I have a small 12" portable fan I use when working outside and it replaced a big noisy 24" box fan. It is no where near the size or amp rating yet it puts out about the same volume of air. So the efficiency of a fan is based on a lot more than amps drawn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I had an overheating issue at speed or under idle and I determined it was my new aftermarket thermostat, I replaced it with a genuine Toyota 90916-03090 thermostat and problem resolved. The Toyota thermostat has a larger valve opening and a small bypass. This is one of those parts where it is best to stick with original equipment. Oh and always orient that bypass so it is inline with the index mark on the thermostat housing.

On another note, my aftermarket fans are working fine, quieter than OE and appears to be pulling gobs of air through the radiator.

Have a great day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Forgot the radiator cap.
Motorad ST-36 Safety Lever Radiator Cap - Amazon.com
I used 3/8" fuel line for the hoses going to the throttle body from the evap cannister
I also used 3/8" for the hose going to the back side of the heads, that runs just over the top of the fuel injectors.

The only thing I didn't replace was the heater core but someone that owned the RAV4 before me must have replaced it not too much before I bought it. I flushed it before I hooked it into my new system and the water was very clear right from the start, I rinsed it out with distilled water and hooked the heater hoses up.

Filled it with Prestone Anti-Freeze, 70% and 30% distilled water. I did not use extended life anti-freeze as it gets acidic after a few years and must be replaced anyway.
Do you know if the radiator on our Rav’s are the same for the auto vs. manual transaxle? Having trouble finding a definitive answer.

Also, I stumbled upon this radiator on Amazon Prime. I’d love to get all the parts needed so I can do this repair later this week. Let me know what you think. We have an AT AWD Rav

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MSAUO9C/ref=mp_s_a_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1511789091&sr=8-5&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=164007A500&dpPl=1&dpID=51roTjVbwAL&ref=plSrch
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Stiglet, they are the same aftermarket anyway; there aren't any part number differences between the two for aftermarket radiators, but I did find that Toyota had different part numbers. I used the Spectra Premium Radiators CU2292, and it fit my RAV4 with manual tranny and a friend ordered one for his automatic RAV4.1 and it went in with no problems. If you get a new thermostat only get the OEM Toyota one, the aftermarket ones I tried did not work properly and caused overheating.

I would highly recommend the same aftermarket fans.

To change the radiator, remove the hoses, remove the fans, unbolt the radiator and ac condenser, and then you can get the radiator out. You don't have to remove the AC condenser. With the aftermarket fans I was able to put the radiator with fans back into place.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
It's been over a year now and my aftermarket fans are still going strong and no problems, even on the hottest south Florida summer days driving around town with the AC running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
It's been over a year now and my aftermarket fans are still going strong and no problems, even on the hottest south Florida summer days driving around town with the AC running.
Awesome. Did you ever change the mounts for those fans? I’m not much of a fabricator. Cutting aluminum stock and pop-riveting are about the limits of my metal fab skills, currently.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Awesome. Did you ever change the mounts for those fans? I’m not much of a fabricator. Cutting aluminum stock and pop-riveting are about the limits of my metal fab skills, currently.
I never did the shrouds because they work quite well without it and I think it probably lets more air through the radiator at speed without the restriction. I did use some aluminum strips so that I could mount the fans to the radiator using bolts rather than using the zip tie method.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I never did the shrouds because they work quite well without it and I think it probably lets more air through the radiator at speed without the restriction. I did use some aluminum strips so that I could mount the fans to the radiator using bolts rather than using the zip tie method.

By the way Amazon has that radiator at a great price.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Extended Life Antifreeze

I know I earlier stated don't buy the 5 year coolant, well my mind has been changed on that. I now use it but I check the ph level every 6 months or after adding fluid to assure my PH stays between very close to 10.0. Note that some coolants, particularly extended life coolants with an extended life can be as low as 9.0 ph with a 50/50 mix. Again only use distilled water in your coolant system to dilute your antifreeze.

Now that aluminum heads and engine blocks and other components have become as common as iron under the hood, the addition of an acid, such as automotive coolant that has dropped below 9.0 pH, creates a textbook battery. The resulting transfer of electrons can wreak havoc on your water pump, engine block, cylinder heads, head gaskets, heater core, heater control valve, radiator, hoses and every other metal component. Your ideal pH range is between 9.8 pH and 10.2 pH and a system below 9.0 pH can cause extensive damage in as little as thirty days. ref https://tomdwyer.com/2010/car-information/coolant-ph/

Any OAT antifreeze will work in a Japanese auto, but don't use silicate antifreeze in any Japanese coolant system. Evidence shows it reduces water pump life in certain Japanese import cars.

See the chart for antifreeze that does not contain silicates. https://images.oreillyauto.com/uploads/pdf/ad/SD_672 AFZ Comparison Chart-1.pdf

I use these test strips for checking my antifreeze, Cool-Trak 311519 Coolant Testing Strips - Set of 50 (amazon.com)
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top