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Will my Hybrid RAV 4 go through a creek crossing without breaking down. I heard all Hybrid cars can not handle water is this true?
 

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Hybrids can handle water as good or perhaps even better than similar conventionally powered vehicles. Hybrids may have an edge in EV mode where there is no exhaust or air intake needed. The question is the after effects. If I absolutely had to cross water, I would shut off any unneeded accessories and put the car in EV mode. Here are videos of a Prius going through water. One with a good outcome, one with a bad outcome,












Will my Hybrid RAV 4 go through a creek crossing without breaking down. I heard all Hybrid cars can not handle water is this true?
 

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A thought I just had but be forewarned, it is without a bunch of research. If I'm not mistaken, Toyota uses a NiMH battery at least in the RAV4. Previous hybrids used Lithium Ion/polymer. Lithium reacts with water which would be bad if submerged Not sure how NiMH handles water. So my point, generalized research might depend upon the type of battery the hybrid is using at the time of the test.
 

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A thought I just had but be forewarned, it is without a bunch of research. If I'm not mistaken, Toyota uses a NiMH battery at least in the RAV4. Previous hybrids used Lithium Ion/polymer. Lithium reacts with water which would be bad if submerged Not sure how NiMH handles water. So my point, generalized research might depend upon the type of battery the hybrid is using at the time of the test.
Toyota has used NiMH in the Prius and other hybrids from the beginning. The exceptions are the plug in Prius (now called the Prime) and some models of the current, 4th, generation Prius.

Fully electric vehicles, like Tesla, tend to use Lithium.
 

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Hybrids can handle water as good or perhaps even better than similar conventionally powered vehicles.
Famous last words. Both those videos had bad outcomes BTW.
You try submerging your 450 volt inverter/converter, under load, and see how it comes out. Not to mention the thousands of dollars of other electronics under the hood. None of it is rated for submersion.
 

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" If I absolutely had to cross water, "


Famous last words. Both those videos had bad outcomes BTW.
You try submerging your 450 volt inverter/converter, under load, and see how it comes out. Not to mention the thousands of dollars of other electronics under the hood. None of it is rated for submersion.
 

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Once again the key question is ‘how deep’? No vehicle save a boat or specialized military (duck boat) vehicle can cross the ‘river’ we saw in those videos without specialized modification. The real question is what direct competitor to the Rav comes ready to do better?
 

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Not a chance!
Once again the key question is ‘how deep’? No vehicle save a boat or specialized military (duck boat) vehicle can cross the ‘river’ we saw in those videos without specialized modification. The real question is what direct competitor to the Rav comes ready to do better?
Try it! Make sure you have someone take a video of the mess! 2 feet of water I’m sure it will not be trouble free!
 

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Even 12" of water would be pushing your luck. But as posted already, what CSUV can do better?.
BTW 12" of water moving at sufficient speed can push a car sideways, RAV4 included.
 

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Unless you have a vehicle that's specially made/modified to run with the axles submerged don't do it or change our the fluids/grease each time they're submerged. It's best not to submerge your running gear, I'd keep any water at ground clearance.

If it's your property can you make a fording area, change the stream flow to wide and shallow in the spot where you want to cross?

I used to off road in a modified 1974 Ford Bronco (the "Early" Bronco not the big one). Whenever I'd submerge the front axle I'd repack the bearings and make sure to run the front drive line to get it warm enough to drive out moisture. And yes, even though the bearings are "sealed" the cool water on the warm housing would create a vacuum that would draw in moisture. I had 31" tall tires on the rig so I have over 15" of clearance just with the tires and I had a 2.5 inch suspension lift as well and double shocked on all 4 wheels. There were mod kits to run in deep which moved differential vents (as well as other things) from the top of the differential to the roof or air intake level depending on how radical you planed to get.

Cheers,
 
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