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Exactly! And it has a V6 that beats any turbo.
 

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The turbo wasn't an issue for me but the CVT was. I am pretty sure when the next update (2019 MY?) happens, it will have a turbo and CVT to keep up with the fuel economy numbers of others like the CRV and Outback . The good news is that most CVT's now mimic shift points which makes driving one a bit more enjoyable now.
 

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No on either count.

Because both technologies are already mature and reliable.

Back in the day, people didn't want to buy automatic transmissions because as with anything new, people were afraid of new. Especially old people. :D
The same was happening when cars started getting more electronics in them. Some avoid sunroofs because they think they leak. Everyone is crazy in their own way. :wink

It's fine not to want to be on the cutting edge of technology while the bugs are worked out. This is not the case with turbos or CVTs though. Both technologies are significant milestones in automotive engineering and are here to stay because they are superior to their predecessors. Except the turbo has been around for 100 years and is already on its way out just like the internal combustion engine.
 

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Bought mine because it was what I wanted, it was made in Japan and it's a Toyota.
 

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I bought the RAV4 especially because it did not have a CVT. They may have improved but I wanted to wait a bit longer before owning one myself.
 

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Yes.

When it comes to everyday driving I prefer a CVT, especially with city driving. I'm not concerned about reliability with a CVT as I'm sure it's just as reliable as a 6-speed automatic. They are proven to be more efficient and more versatile than a traditional automatic. But I just like the feel of a traditional automatic when driving spiritedly, as I do with my cars. The car is more predictable in response and power. That being said, I won't be sad when Toyota drops a CVT in the RAV4 because I'll probably have a hybrid or alt fuel vehicle by then.

I definitely don't want to see a turbo under the hood and as long as the RAV4 stays naturally aspirated, I'll buy it. Let's face it: gasoline engines are as efficient as we can make them. The best way to improve fuel efficiency at this point (except hybrids) is to reduce weight and improve aerodynamics, but that's ungodly more expensive than slapping forced induction on the engine for 2-3 extra MPG. All that does is add another layer of complexity to the engine, adding expense to maintenance and service costs just so we can save a $1 at each fill up (it's really so manufacturers can comply with EPA fuel efficiency standards). No thank you. KISS (keep it simple stupid).
 

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The best way to improve fuel efficiency at this point (except hybrids) is to reduce weight and improve aerodynamics, but that's ungodly more expensive than slapping forced induction on the engine for 2-3 extra MPG.
Forced induction engines are smaller and lighter. That's the point.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No on either count.

Because both technologies are already mature and reliable.

Back in the day, people didn't want to buy automatic transmissions because as with anything new, people were afraid of new. Especially old people. :D
The same was happening when cars started getting more electronics in them. Some avoid sunroofs because they think they leak. Everyone is crazy in their own way. :wink

It's fine not to want to be on the cutting edge of technology while the bugs are worked out. This is not the case with turbos or CVTs though. Both technologies are significant milestones in automotive engineering and are here to stay because they are superior to their predecessors. Except the turbo has been around for 100 years and is already on its way out just like the internal combustion engine.

Perhaps turbos and CVT's are fairly reliable now, but nothing I read suggest any *cough* CRV *cough* are quite as reliable as the RAV4 platform,


I was thinking in terms of preference to avoid turbo lag and the "quirkiness" of many CVT'S (even at the expense of a few mpg's)
 

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Depends which CVT you are talking about. The Hybrid CVT has two electric motors and a planetary gear set, which has less moving parts than a regular transmission and have been proven bulletproof in the other hybrids Toyota has provided.

Toyota's will soon have the same turbo power train that is found in newer Lexus models. Through those models they have found ways to increase the lifespan of the turbos and allow them to finally be brought to the mainstream high volume vehicles like the Camry and possibly even the RAV4 in time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Those were two reasons yes.



Granted I will trust almost anything from Toyota, especially after seeing how my wife has abused hers and racks up the miles without issue. I still wanted something old school simplistic. Turbos are reliable but require more maintenance and add more to the equation of what could go wrong, I've also had 2 poor experiences with FI Subarus. Toyota does direct injection very well compared to the competition but again, just more complexity for the sake of a couple hp and a minor mpg bump.

As far as CVT, I kinda like them, but after seeing my mom's issues with her Nissan and others with Honda, I will continue to be reserved on it.



I've owned many cars and have traded often as a bad habit, so I've experienced most of today's trending developments. To break this habit, I went with my 16 Rav after growing fond of my wife's 14. No regrets so far. More power and better headlights would be nice, but I can live with things as is.
 

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Yup,
No Turbos or CVT for me, that's why I just bought a low mileage 2012/V6.
I am wondering though, if CVT 's can haul trailers, and would they actually make a trailer package for that type of tranny.
Ott.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've owned many cars and have traded often as a bad habit

Me too ... and unfortunately I'm likely to repeat that mistake.


Toyotas and Hondas aren't necessarily my preferences, but in an attempt to minimize the "beat down" at trade in time I believe that'll be my choices.
 

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Same here, usually a Honda loyalist until they came out with CVT and I read about the judder complaints.

Turbo is nice for low end torque but probably less reliable since there is this one additional component to think about (and I think requires more frequent oil changes which isn't a biggie) so we just went with a hybrid RAV4 for fuel savings and eCVT. From an outsider's point of view, it seems the RAV4 Hybrid is more complicated but I think it can be the vehicle of choice in wintry locations like Canada where it's the hybrid battery that starts the gasoline engine and where heating the cabin interior and windshield is kinda top notch.

Also, I didn't like the outgoing CRV's exterior but prefer the simplicity of its dash layout. Circular side vents and rectangular center vents, come on. I actually saw another car maker do the same thing on their SUV so I'm not as bothered anymore. :)
 

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My wife had a '15 Honda CR-V with CVT as a loaner vehicle while her '10 CR-V was having the Takata airbag recall work done and says that the CVT did well in both Interstate and twisty bend mountain driving. But she prefers the 5-speed auto in her own Honda. We haven't had any experience with a turbo gas-engine car but have driven a VW turbo diesel and it worked well and was amazingly quiet at idle as well as on the road.

My RAV has the V6 so no turbo needed or wanted, and the 5-speed auto gearbox which is OK. Would prefer a manual gearbox though, if it had the same final gearing as does the auto model.
 

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The turbo wasn't an issue for me but the CVT was. I am pretty sure when the next update (2019 MY?) happens, it will have a turbo and CVT to keep up with the fuel economy numbers of others like the CRV and Outback . The good news is that most CVT's now mimic shift points which makes driving one a bit more enjoyable now.
I was riding in my brothers new 2017 Outback a week ago and noticed it had paddle shift on wheel similar to my RAV SE, only his is a CVT transmission. I asked him how the heck that works since it's continiously variable and that made zero sense to me. He had no idea what I was talking about, he just drives it and likes it LOL.
 

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I was riding in my brothers new 2017 Outback a week ago and noticed it had paddle shift on wheel similar to my RAV SE, only his is a CVT transmission. I asked him how the heck that works since it's continiously variable and that made zero sense to me. He had no idea what I was talking about, he just drives it and likes it LOL.
I still don't understand these virtual shifting when I first read about them on the 2013 Accord with CVT.

Is the driver really effectively "shifting gears" (since CVT's don't have gears) and moving the torque band around or is the computer messing up with the driver's mind and making him/her believe she is shifting but really isn't?
 

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I think possibly it just mimics the shifting of gears through the stereo system to fool people into believing they have a "real transmission". >:D
 

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I bought the RAV4 because it was a bargain compared to the turbo BMW I was driving before.
 

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Exactly! And it has a V6 that beats any turbo.
I have a V6 as well and it rocks. It is however getting elderly with about 155,000 miles so have been looking for a replacement. Sadly the new RAV4s have no pickup. I hate to be a trader but I'm going to have to at least test drive the 2017 Honda CRV turbo with 190 HP. The question is can I hold out another year to see of Toyota will give the 2018 RAV4 the Lexus 2.0 liter turbo.

The other question is whether the 2018 model will have a CVT trans which I don't love but realize I will inevitably will have to live with.

I'm fairly happy with mpg but know I can do better.
 
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