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I am a prospective buyer of a new Hybrid Rav4 and have tried to consider the advantages vs the disadvantages over a standard ICE only Rav4.

The advantages are:
- better fuel economy
- more power and acceleration
- Some believe a quieter ride

The disadvantages are:

- Higher Cost
- Less storage space
- Less effective AWD
- Rear Seats don't fold down as flat
- some believe the suspension can give bumpier ride

To me so far the advantages out weight the the advantages.

Comments please.
Thanks
Tom
 

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I haven't driven a 2016 gas model, but I did own a 2015 Limited and have driven an XLE Hybrid and Limited Hybrid, I bought a Limited Hybrid, it rides better than the 2015 Limited and is quieter, has more power and gets much better city MPG, the flat cargo floor is not big deal for me, AWD isn't much of a factor either, the Hybrid will work fine for me, it's not an offroad vehicle after all, AWD more appropriately means All Weather Drive. :smile
 

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...........
To me so far the advantages out weight the the advantages.

Comments please.
Thanks, Tom
Hi Tom ^^ I assume the 2nd "advantages" was meant to be "disadvantages".

No Hybrid ever, in my stable.
- I always buy mint used / low mileage gas vehicles
- often Hybird's, have zero resale value after 10 years / when the costly battery pack platform, reaches its design life...SCRAP value = $500
- a mint 2006 RAV4 Limited v6, with decent mileage is still worth +/-$8,000

^^ True difference in Resale Value, buys lots of gas.
- and I always enjoy top dollar for my used vehicles (sell private), when it comes time for me to upgrade

Money Wise:
An older Hybird is a "Liability" while a similar gas powered RAV4 is an "Asset" equaling good CASH.
Our 2008 Limited v6, will only depreciate about $3,000 if I sell vehicle in 3 years.
- already have buyer waiting / try finding a buyer for a decade old Hybird / just lost ROI
But I'm left with $10,000 Cdn.
- still a sizable deposit/down payment, upgrading to newer v6 Highlander or Lexus RX350 /in 2018.

DON'T Ignore the used car Value, in your buying decision / truly factor it, into purchasing equation.
- Hybird's cost more new initially & likely depreciate faster !!
 

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Hi Tom ^^ I assume the 2nd "advantages" was meant to be "disadvantages".

No Hybrid ever, in my stable.
- I always buy mint used / low mileage gas vehicles
- often Hybird's, have zero resale value after 10 years / when the costly battery pack platform, reaches its design life...SCRAP value = $500
- a mint 2006 RAV4 Limited v6, with decent mileage is still worth +/-$8,000

^^ True difference in Resale Value, buys lots of gas.
- and I always enjoy top dollar for my used vehicles (sell private), when it comes time for me to upgrade

Money Wise:
An older Hybird is a "Liability" while a similar gas powered RAV4 is an "Asset" equaling good CASH.
Our 2008 Limited v6, will only depreciate about $3,000 if I sell vehicle in 3 years.
- already have buyer waiting / try finding a buyer for a decade old Hybird / just lost ROI
But I'm left with $10,000 Cdn.
- still a sizable deposit/down payment, upgrading to newer v6 Highlander or Lexus RX350 /in 2018.

DON'T Ignore the used car Value, in your buying decision / truly factor it, into purchasing equation.
- Hybird's cost more new initially & likely depreciate faster !!
Hybrids often have zero value after ten years? Show me any 2006 hybrid that is free or anywhere close to it that hasn't been wrecked and crushed into a pancake. That's one of the dumbest statements I have seen on this forum! Your clueless on hybrids, their resale value and reliability are above average.
 

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Also I owned a regular Rav4 before and now I have a hybrid xle. To me, hybrid xle is quieter, can be faster if you put on sport mode but most importantly it gets much better gas mileage plus in my state it's eligible to use HOV lane for free which is very important for frequent highway user commies like me! :)
 

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Hybrids often have zero value after ten years? Show me any 2006 hybrid that is free or anywhere close to it that hasn't been wrecked and crushed into a pancake. That's one of the dumbest statements I have seen on this forum! Your clueless on hybrids, their resale value and reliability are above average.
BS :nerd ^^ Hybird off-warranty & when the battery platform gives up / no one wants to consider the real costs, over years & years of service.

Yes, Hybird will save gas money, but you paid a premium price for it (to break even, you have to drive your hybrid over 10years on average)

Yes, it will depreciate more when batteries close to the replacement point and the high price of electronic replacement.
- the cost of battery is not guaranteed to go down
Your gambling several thousands of dollars, should you finally have battery problems with the older hybrid...so Kiss your trade-in value good-bye.

With so many cars now getting MPG in 30’s, a hybrid isn’t worth it to most.
Saving on gas doesn’t add up over the life of the car...especially at $30/ barrel of crude oil.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hybrid Cars Pros and Cons - Benefits & Problems

oldman
My 2004 Prius battery pack died at 9 years w/92000 miles. Was quoted $4000 to replace it. Talked them down to $3100 because I was a "good customer" who always had the car serviced at the dealership.

I will not be buying another hybrid or electric car. First, I keep my cars too long, the batteries will fail in that time, and they are still too expensive to replace. Second, even if I was to sell or trade the car before failure, I would feel bad sticking someone with a battery that will likely fail soon after. Finally, hybrid cars typically are loaded with electronics that the dealership cannot repair. They can only replace them at a very high cost. I had to repair the multi-display 3 years ago for a manufacturing defect Toyota knew about, (and issued a TSB for), but never issued a recall. It failed outside the basic warranty and Toyota wanted $2000 to replace it. I work at a major computer company and had a friend here fix it by re-soldering the failed connecting pins on one of the boards in the unit. It has worked flawlessly ever since. The way manufacturers "service" electronics is the equivalent of replacing your engine it the alternator failed. They don't do electronic repairs. Just replacements. Having official manufacturer service should not be orders of magnitude more expensive than finding aftermarket solutions. A bit more is reasonable, but not the way it is now.

I just can't afford hybrids any more. Maybe once I can buy a Duracell replacement pack from Autozone and drop it in myself I'll come back, but not right now.

Scott B. •
While I generally agree with this article, it does omit the long-term problems that will come with hybrid (as well as electrical) technology in vehicles. Many conventional fuelled vehicles in their latter years of life are commonly reconditioned by enthusiasts, by mechanics, and also consumed by the third world, where 20+ year old cars are the commonplace vehicle of choice. This is possible because to recondition and re-purpose old vehicles is currently very inexpensive to do, and many parts are relatively easy to fabricate even after the manufacturers have stopped making spare parts. This is of interest here because the hybrid technology, as a green technology, needs to service these market niches as well to be truly green. By merely saving fuel for the initial buyer but then turning into a consumer waste product, hardly qualifies as a viable alternative to conventional fuel efficient automobiles, which many have a considerable lifespan well into their second and third decades of life. This is the true time frame one needs to consider when evaluating the potential environmental impact of hybrid technology.

As the article stresses, the hybrid battery will likely last a long time for the initial user, but it actually does remain a cost prohibitive component to replace (since if cannot be "repaired") when the car get old. Yes, it likely won't die on you as the initial buyer, but how can a car be considered environmentally friendly if it only has a 5-9 year life cycle? Secondly, the main battery is not the only component in the hybrid (or electrical) vehicle that runs afoul of this cost prohibitive replacement for reconditioning/re-purposing consideration. There are also at least two micro-processors in every hybrid/electric vehicle with one to control the power distribution and a second to control the electrical motor function -- both of which are also very expensive to replace (in the $800-$1800 each range). To simply pawn this problem of expensive non-repairable components off to the secondary used parts market (as the article does regarding replacement batteries) is ignoring the fact that such parts are only salvaged from cars lost due to vehicular accidents. Truly old cars that are being disposed of due to regular wear and tear have little or no life left in these parts and therefore severely limit the viability of relying on a salvage system for part. Moreover, processors and batteries are highly proprietary parts, not easily reverse engineered by a third-party, nor easily interchangeable (or not interchangeable at all) between manufacturers, and when they fail the hybrid/electric vehicle does in fact become a complete loss, despite the majority of it still technically "works." There is no repairing it unless you are willing to spend the excessive sums of money to buy these replacement parts and who is willing to do this with a 20+ year old hybrid?

I am not saying this problems cannot be overcome nor that hybrid tech is not a great idea in theory, but given the strong disincentives among auto companies to avoid taking steps (like standardizing battery and processor technology and opening it up to third party competition) that would actually extend the life of these vehicles and bring the prices down on these prohibitively expensive parts, we are left dependant upon outside pressures, such as government regulations, to mandate such changes before too long in order to avoid these issues. Given the general glacial and impotent manner outside regulation is developed, however, I question whether hybrid (or electric) vehicle technology will end up to be a positive net gain for the global environment whatsoever. In fact, it may very likely end up being much more of a burden upon natural resources in the long run than conventional fuel efficient engines currently are, simply because hybrids, due to costly components, end up having a shorter operational lifespan than the conventional fuel efficient alternative.
 

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the hybrid battery will likely last a long time for the initial user, but it actually does remain a cost prohibitive component to replace (since if cannot be "repaired") when the car get old.
Battery technology advances in leaps, engineering paradigm shifts. Do not be surprised to find in ten years a major improvement in modularity, replaceability, and lower costs. Add to that the fact that electric car batteries can be recycled, and the future looks pretty good.
 

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Uh, I had a 2004 Prius which was fine until it got totalled in 2015 with about 160000 km on it. Insurance gave me CAD$7000 + tax = $8000 for it.

The insurance adjuster was shocked that a car of that price category could have a resale value that was so high after 11 years.
 
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- often Hybird's, have zero resale value after 10 years / when the costly battery pack platform, reaches its design life...SCRAP value = $500
I assure you that my 2006 Prius is still going strong and has plenty of resale value. The misconceptions about hybrids are staggering. I know I'm just piling on what other posters have said but stupid comments motivate me.
 

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Battery technology advances in leaps, engineering paradigm shifts. Do not be surprised to find in ten years a major improvement in modularity, replaceability, and lower costs. Add to that the fact that electric car batteries can be recycled, and the future looks pretty good.
you don't even have to look to the future, a Prius battery is 5000+$ at the dealership, there's a couple of places that you can find online that sell and install a new non oem battery packs for less than half that.
 

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Yes, Hybird will save gas money, but you paid a premium price for it (to break even, you have to drive your hybrid over 10years on average)
Since the Rav4 hybrid costs only about $700 above the gas AWD Rav4 and given that it is about 50% more fuel efficient in city/mixed driving, it certainly won't take 10 years to pay back the hybrid "premium". I used to get about 20-22 mpg with my 2013 Rav4 Limited; now I am getting 33-35 mpg in my Rav4 Hybrid Limited. I drive about 300 miles per week so I'm saving about 5 to 6 gallons a week. At $1.80/gallon, that's about 70 weeks of driving to break even not 520 weeks. Of course, if gas increases in price it will happen sooner. If I get better summer mileage (likely as I live in Chicago), it will happen sooner.

Bottom line, a lot of the "don't buy a hybrid" arguments (it's slower, poor acceleration, large cost premium, etc.) don't fit the Rav4 Hybrid.
 

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The purpose of the OP in starting this thread was to learn about the comparative advantages and disadvantages of purely gasoline-driven RAVs and hybrid RAVs. That calls for presentations on both sides of the question, not censored ones favoring only hybrids. Open discussion is what this forum is all about.
 

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The purpose of the OP in starting this thread was to learn about the comparative advantages and disadvantages of purely gasoline-driven RAVs and hybrid RAVs. That calls for presentations on both sides of the question, not censored ones favoring only hybrids. Open discussion is what this forum is all about.
I don't disagree and perhaps this thread got sidetracked by a post or two with some gross errors and misconceptions that myself and others wanted to respond to. That said, in the spirit of the OP question, I recommend that they look at Alex Sykes recently posted review of the Rav4 Hybrid:

\

Alex focuses his review on exactly this question and does so in a seemingly unbiased and certainly complete manner.
 

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Totally agree-I just watched that review and it's impressive just how good TOYOTA has made this car!
 

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According to Alex (car reviews), the RAV4 Hybrid's AWD system is the worst of the bunch but still better than a FWD or RWD CUV. The non-hybrid's AWD is second best after the Jeep because one can lock the differentials at low speed and get 50/50.
 

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My wife drives a 16 non-hybrid limited and I drive a 16 hybrid limited. From that perspective, perhaps I can help answer...

Start with the idea that both cars are identical...

Physical and Cosmetics: The hybrid has slightly different badges, and hybrid related electronics displays (but no tach.) The hybrid has fewer color choices. The hybrid is an inch higher (but I wouldn't take either vehicle off-road.) The rear seats on the hybrid don't quite fold down flat and there's a hump in the cargo area for the battery. The hybrid is heavier than the non-hybrid.

Driving: The hybrid has slightly better pickup and less engine noise. The hybrid has a less capable AWD system in terms of absolute ability (though I have no idea how that will impact real-world driving.) Braking on the hybrid can feel somewhat unnatural for someone used to a non-hybrid. (I'm still getting used to it...) I'm still not convinced either way on body roll, suspension, and handling for either. (Coming from a Mazda CX-5, both RAV4's have more body roll and less handling, but are softer.)

Being that this is the first year Toyota is putting the hybrid drive train in the RAV4, and the extremely low oil prices right now, it's anyone's guess as to the long term costs of the hybrid. If oil prices stay low for several years or if some major design flaw is found (and not fixed) in the implementation of the RAV4's hybrid system, the resale values of the RAV4 hybrid could be lower than expected. (On the other hand, if oil prices rebound to new highs and the RAV4 system is as reliable as the Prius system has proven to be, the resale on the RAV4 could be higher.) The non-hybrid is pretty much a known beast.
 
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