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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at maybe buying a 2017 RAV4. And if the NADA price guide includes extra fees like dealership/taxes, it looks like I got a good quote from the dealership. But if they don't include that stuff, looks like I got a not so great quote. I'm in Georgia, so taxes alone are 7%.

Like here a link to the RAV4 XLE FWD on NADA's site that I think will work:

Well, apparently I can't post links yet...

It says the highest price paid was $28,985. Does that include taxes/title/dealership stuff or no?

Also, I want to get an idea of how much this is going to depreciate year over year because I don't know that I'm going to drive this car long term. I'm thinking check similarly optioned RAV4's year by year.

I'll probably use both NADA and Kelley Blue Book to do that research. Does anybody know what the underlying differences and biases are between those two services? Are there other services I should use also or instead to do that research?
 

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Prices are for the vehicle alone. Besides taxes many dealers add on conveyance and other fees, sometimes outrageous ones. I'm not sure why the prices vary somewhat between Nadaguides, KBB and Edmunds but I use Nada.
 

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There's no way they could include the taxes and other items as they vary by state and dealership.

Google new car pricing services for other ways to get pricing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. I'd suspected NADA doesn't include the other fees, but it's good to get it reinforced, if only by people on an internet message board...

Researching this, NADA prices are typically higher than other services because they have some algorithm that assumes the car is "very clean". That's what I read anyway.
 

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I'm looking at maybe buying a 2017 RAV4. And if the NADA price guide includes extra fees like dealership/taxes, it looks like I got a good quote from the dealership. But if they don't include that stuff, looks like I got a not so great quote. I'm in Georgia, so taxes alone are 7%.

Like here a link to the RAV4 XLE FWD on NADA's site that I think will work:

Well, apparently I can't post links yet...

It says the highest price paid was $28,985. Does that include taxes/title/dealership stuff or no?

Also, I want to get an idea of how much this is going to depreciate year over year because I don't know that I'm going to drive this car long term. I'm thinking check similarly optioned RAV4's year by year.

I'll probably use both NADA and Kelley Blue Book to do that research. Does anybody know what the underlying differences and biases are between those two services? Are there other services I should use also or instead to do that research?

I've been keeping an eye on the following thread--It breaks down a lot of pricing info with add-on packages and with some including varying state taxes:

http://www.rav4world.com/forums/123-4-4-general/241153-2017-rav4-prices-paid.html

Also, for a small fee, Consumer Reports will provide a fairly precise true dealer cost, including the various option packages. Have not tried it yet, but would be a handy bit of info to know.

For depreciation, the RAV4 has a stellar track record.

And...welcome to the forum! Let us know how your search and decision go.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks RavNRed.

My RAV4 test drive went way better than I expected. All the enthusiast reviews on HouTube diss how it drives. I guess I'm not an enthusiast! Which is no doubt a good thing. Should save me a hell of a lotta money in the long run.

Now it's just a matter of nailing down price, of course considering the options I want.

I'm headed over to the Edmunds web site to price RAV4's over the years, to give me an idea of depreciation. It'd just be an indicator though. There's no way to know for sure how much it will depreciate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Found this interesting. Looking at the Edmunds True Cost of Ownership tool, here:

Apparently I still can't post links...

Now, that tool may be complete bunk. I don't know. And it is trying to predict future prices, which is always reading the tea leaves. It's like trying to tell where the stock market is going to be next year. You just don't know.

But looking at their expectations for a Toyota RAV4 XLE FWD vs a Mazda CX-5 Touring FWD. I used those trim lines because they're both one level below the level that comes with leather.

Over a 5 year period, the tool expect the 2017 RAV4 to depreciate by $11.9K. Now the 2017 CX-5 isn't out yet, so we use the 2016. Over a 5 year period, they expect the 2016 CX-5 to depreciate by $14.9K. So the RAV4 wins here by $3K.

However, their 5 year depreciation for that same trim 2013 RAV4 is $8.9K. Whereas their 5 year depreciation for the same trim 2013 CX-5 is $8.0K. So the CX-5 wins here by almost $1,000.

Makes me think the saying about the Toyota holding it's value is more relevant when buying new cars than when buying used cars.
 
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