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LOL - WCAX is my local station :cool:

I was listening to the news last week about how the global supply chain is falling apart, Christmas shopping will probably be a nightmare and so on, and I was thinking that I'd kick myself if snows started selling out like toilet paper... No sense putting off a purchase I'm going to have to make in the next 8 weeks anyway. So, my General Altimax Arctic's ought to be arriving today or tomorrow. Also glad I picked up a cheap set of steelies this summer, so now I'll have 2 complete sets that can be swapped in the driveway when the weather turns.

Granted, most tires are made in the US, but you can't take anything for granted these days...

PS - If you buy your tires online, it might pay to at least ask your local dealer how much they charge to mount and balance... My dealer charges $69, which is cheaper than the local tire shop.
 

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"Will a snow tire shortage leave you stuck this winter?"

I thought our AWD Hybrid LE did well in snow with all-season tires, nevertheless I bought a mounted set of Blizzaks while the car was still new.
My tire guy gets very busy when the first snowflakes fall.
I grew up in the north. Always had FWD, never had issues with all season tires. never bought snow tires. Roads clear in a day or so. I can see a need if you live in unplowed or mountainous road area, but for most people, they don't really need them. I just saying if you never had them, think hard about if you really need them.
 

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I'll give you this much - today's all season tires are a lot better than they used to be. The General Altimax RT43's all season's I like are actually M+S rated, and I used them on my CRV last year since I knew I would be trading it in and didn't want to risk the new car using a different size, and my old snows had worn out... They worked surprisingly well (provided my driveway got plowed). If I didn't live in the rural mountains I'd likely use them year round.

I'd agree that generally, people who buy snow tires know they need snow tires. They are similar to any kind of insurance - they provide confidence for those occasions you don't always see coming... especially if you tend to travel before the plows hit the roads. Also, keep in mind snow tires are just as much for steering control and stopping as they are for truding through ice, snow and slush... Not to mention the rubber is specifically made for low temperatures, so even dry pavement grip is improved. I feel better knowing my wife has a solid winter vehicle to get her around.

But if you've got by without them, certainly there's no need to rush out and buy them. But the wooly caterpillars around my part are calling for a rough start this winter ;)
 

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I grew up in the north. Always had FWD, never had issues with all season tires. never bought snow tires. Roads clear in a day or so. I can see a need if you live in unplowed or mountainous road area, but for most people, they don't really need them. I just saying if you never had them, think hard about if you really need them.
I live in the true frozen north, in BC, winter tires are mandatory if you live outside of metro Vancouver, from Oct 1 to end if April. Same in Quebec. Driving with winter tires is a must in my books.
 

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Last car I bought snow tires for was a 1980 Chevy Citation. I live in far northeast Iowa, so we do get snow. Light right foot, phone in pocket, pay attention, take your time.
But, JUST IN CASE, I have a short handled shovel, 3 or 4 large candles, a big tin can (for melting snow to drink), and a very heavy blanket in the trunk. Darn. NOTHING TO EAT. Maybe add a box of saltines.
 

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But, JUST IN CASE, I have a short handled shovel, 3 or 4 large candles, a big tin can (for melting snow to drink), and a very heavy blanket in the trunk. Darn. NOTHING TO EAT. Maybe add a box of saltines.
Yes - bring something to eat. But saltines don't have enough salt to melt snow very fast so replace those with rock salt or an environmental alternative:)
 

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All kidding aside, as I've grown older I've begun taking roadside preparedness more seriously. When I was younger it was no big deal to leave my car on the side of the road and hitch into town... These days not so much lol.

It doesn't take a huge investment to stash away a few important items (road flares, small compressor, battery jumper, flashlight, gloves, rain poncho, rope, first-aid kit, bottled water, blanket, a few RME packs... and duck tape). It will all pay for itself the first time I need them :)
 

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Yes - bring something to eat. But saltines don't have enough salt to melt snow very fast so replace those with rock salt or an environmental alternative:)
Candles melt snow in large tin can while keeping toes and fingers from freezing. Wash the crackers down with the melted snow. Or just have a few packages of noodles to add to the melted snow.
 

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All kidding aside, as I've grown older I've begun taking roadside preparedness more seriously. When I was younger it was no big deal to leave my car on the side of the road and hitch into town... These days not so much lol.

It doesn't take a huge investment to stash away a few important items (road flares, small compressor, battery jumper, flashlight, gloves, rain poncho, rope, first-aid kit, bottled water, blanket, a few RME packs... and duck tape). It will all pay for itself the first time I need them :)
The rope and duct tape will get you 5 to 15 in some southern states.🤪
 

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Please don't forget that snow tires are also made out of a different compound than all seasons and summer tires. It's not just about the snow, it's also about the temperature. Having all seasons and it's freezing out and your tires are starting to harden thus providing less traction and increased braking distance. Where I live it gets cold and rains a lot and the temperature changes from below freezing to just above it most Fall and beginning of Winter. I run snow tires (AKA Winter tires) from November to about end of March due to the temperatures. This is on my daily driven FWD V6 Camry. This will be the first full Winter of me owning my Rav as I got it in March but didn't install my AT tires until a few months later IIRC. I have driven in the snow in the mountains though.

Discount Tire wrote a great article about Winter tires here:
 

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I grew up in the north. Always had FWD, never had issues with all season tires. never bought snow tires. Roads clear in a day or so. I can see a need if you live in unplowed or mountainous road area, but for most people, they don't really need them. I just saying if you never had them, think hard about if you really need them.
No chains during your Winter season, just in case?
The extra 20-30lbs won't really hurt MPG.
There just might be a time or rare heavy snow event that you might need it?
 

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NE Iowa gets COLD. Minus 20 to minus 30, although, thankfully, not that often. Has been over 40 years since I had a set of snow tires, or anything but the OEM tires.
It's a wonder I'm still alive.
If I had a jeep or four wheel drive pickup, I would have the most expensive winter tires I could find. Those vehicles are ALWAYS in the ditch. Suppose it has anything to do with the testosterone levels in the drivers? 😄
 

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Has been over 40 years since I had a set of snow tires, or anything but the OEM tires.
Glad that works and if I were you I would not buy snow tires either (and I know what you mean about the 4x4s). But where I live I have had to drive FWD cars backwards up the hill in front of our house just to get enough traction to get out of the neighborhood (and that is with snow tires and sometimes even chains installed). I also spent 4 hours getting home one night from 4 miles away in my 4X4 pickup with chains all the way around. This is not wilderness but suburbia. Once enough unprepared cars get stuck on the hills around the plateau the only way up is to find the worst route that nobody would try and make sure your vehicle can handle it. Cold can be a good thing for traction. It is the near freezing temps that create ice in traffic jams and before you know it the car next to you on that gently banked turn is sliding sideways into you.
 

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I'm curious what other folks in Colorado/Utah or similar sunny winter states are driving on in "winter". My winter driving is mostly front range, but frequent trips to Leadville. My concern with dedicated winter tires is precisely the temperature they are optimized for, as we regularly have 50-70F days (or weeks) in December. I realize the ground temp is less responsive than air temp, and definitely lower, but the sun is also pretty intense here, and will melt snow on roads rapidly without any de-icer.

I'm not worried about forward traction; I haven't had major issues with that since I sold my '73 Grand Prix with a 455 weighing down the front tires, but not the rear (which also were afflicted by Posi-track). I'm worried about panic braking, especially at highway speeds on wet roads where the surface temperature is above freezing. I haven't been able to find much info on winter tire wet braking in the 45 degree range, or a direct comparison to all-season wet braking at the same temp.
 

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I grew up in the north. Always had FWD, never had issues with all season tires. never bought snow tires. Roads clear in a day or so. I can see a need if you live in unplowed or mountainous road area, but for most people, they don't really need them. I just saying if you never had them, think hard about if you really need them.
I grew up in north east Ohio, land of the Lake Effect, and learned to drive in the 60s. I don't know where you live but all you need to do is get caught out on the road once during a snow squall or white-out and you're going to wish you had the proper tires on your vehicle. I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess you don't feel the need to have chains in your vehicle either.

"Roads clear in a day or so" is great but what are you going to do in the meantime, pull over to the side of the road and park until the plow comes through? I'd say you've been lucky so far and I wouldn't advice you to push that luck too far.
 
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