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Discussion Starter #1
I'm starting a Distance to Empty Challenge partly to prove the 14.5 gl. tank isn't the issue it's the larger than life 2.5 gallon reserve and a generous Low Fuel "Warning"

My record so far is 114 miles after Low Fuel Light comes on and I filled 12.5 GL meaning I had another 65+ miles to go

Press the in dash odo and let's see who can surpass 150 miles!

-d-
 

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I drove it to empty once. I didn't track the exact number of miles past empty, but I think it was about 120 miles past DTE=0 and 150 past the low fuel light. 3.25 gallons and 4 gallons of fuel, respectively.

Another tidbit I learned, when the pump shuts off automatically there's about 13.75 gallons in the tank. A second try gets it to a full 14.5 gallons. The point is you might have less reserve than you think.

I'm on mobile, but I made a thread to fully document all that if you're curious.
 

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After having overfilled my tank by accident, the tank doesn’t have complete problem filling up to 14.5 gallons. I can tell there was a aeration issue with the gas because it first fill to 10 gallons, waited a little bit, then was able to add 2.6 gallons with small gas spill and I can hear the gas aerating out with a hiss (kinda like burping your coolant after coolant change). Other then that it filled to 14.5 gallons with having to wait. It also stayed past full for 200 miles before the needle started to go below Full line.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
After having overfilled my tank by accident, the tank doesn’t have complete problem filling up to 14.5 gallons. I can tell there was a aeration issue with the gas because it first fill to 10 gallons, waited a little bit, then was able to add 2.6 gallons with small gas spill and I can hear the gas aerating out with a hiss (kinda like burping your coolant after coolant change). Other then that it filled to 14.5 gallons with having to wait. It also stayed past full for 200 miles before the needle started to go below Full line.
Very good information, but this thread isn't about filling out capacity. To participate you have to show your gauge after DTE.
 

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Not very clever with a hybrid. Driving too long on EV without the ICE to charge can/may cause considerable damage to the HV battery.
This happened twice in The Netherlands until now. That is also the main reason the fuel reserve is so big. Just to prevent that the fuel runs out and the HV battery breaks down.
Think about that before accepting this (crazy) challenge. And yes, ask your dealer to confirm this; it's no secret.
 

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Not very clever with a hybrid. Driving too long on EV without the ICE to charge can/may cause considerable damage to the HV battery.
This happened twice in The Netherlands until now. That is also the main reason the fuel reserve is so big. Just to prevent that the fuel runs out and the HV battery breaks down.
Think about that before accepting this (crazy) challenge. And yes, ask your dealer to confirm this; it's no secret.
This part above is hogwash!

Pretty much the only way to permanently harm the batteries is to let them run out and let them sit.

Also just letting the car sit for many months (like all winter) without use will harm the batteries. Exercising them frequently is the best thing for them.

Also there are built-in protections.
The car stops with reserve charge.
While it is possible to run out of gas, it is not possible to run the batteries to 0%! The car will stop with say, 20% actual charge.

Granted that is lower than typical, and if you park at this low of a level it will eventually self-discharge to 0 but that will take a few WEEKS.

There is no harm in doing this experiment if you fuel up and start driving within hours or days of the run out.

I have been driving hybrids and running experiments on them since year 2000. Honda Insight + Ford Escape Hybrid + Ford Fusion Hybrid + Rav4 Hybrid.

Honda Insight was sold still running, at 17 years old and 185,000 miles. Lots of experiments in that car.

Ford Escape Hybrid was running great at 15 years and 236,000 miles when someone crashed into it. I ran those batteries down and up A TON of times. Hypermiled the hell out of that car. Got 160% above EPA MPG too!
 

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Not very clever with a hybrid. Driving too long on EV without the ICE to charge can/may cause considerable damage to the HV battery.
This happened twice in The Netherlands until now. That is also the main reason the fuel reserve is so big. Just to prevent that the fuel runs out and the HV battery breaks down.
Think about that before accepting this (crazy) challenge. And yes, ask your dealer to confirm this; it's no secret.
Good thing we have a 10 year warranty on the HV battery.
 

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This part above is hogwash!
Ask the owners how they feel... What's wrong with you guys? Don't want to see anyone ruin your party? Please go ahead, let me be the wise guy, i don't care. As usual you're always jumping on anything you don't like. Well, have it your way.
 

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2919 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package built June 20
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Okay "Paperboy". Please and kindly provide some contemporary evidence to support this.

Years ago the fuel pump was located outside the tank for easy replacement. There it could be cooled by airflow. Then manufacturers started to put the fuel pump inside the tank. There it is cooled by the liquid gas inside the tank as there is very limited air movement within the tank, just enough to relieve the vacuum made by the gas being pumped out.

There was even a time when there was no need for a fuel pump as the gas was gravity fed into the carburetor. But gas tanks located just forward of the windshield weren't the safest.
 

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Years ago the fuel pump was located outside the tank for easy replacement. There it could be cooled by airflow. Then manufacturers started to put the fuel pump inside the tank. There it is cooled by the liquid gas inside the tank as there is very limited air movement within the tank, just enough to relieve the vacuum made by the gas being pumped out.

There was even a time when there was no need for a fuel pump as the gas was gravity fed into the carburetor. But gas tanks located just forward of the windshield weren't the safest.
It used to be that running out of fuel could cause misfires in the engine, potentially damaging the cylinders/pistons/valves/etc. I don't know how much of a problem this is with modern engines, though: they might be even more sensitive to damage, or maybe there's better protections in place to prevent damage.
 

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Years ago the fuel pump was located outside the tank for easy replacement. There it could be cooled by airflow. Then manufacturers started to put the fuel pump inside the tank. There it is cooled by the liquid gas inside the tank as there is very limited air movement within the tank, just enough to relieve the vacuum made by the gas being pumped out.

There was even a time when there was no need for a fuel pump as the gas was gravity fed into the carburetor. But gas tanks located just forward of the windshield weren't the safest.
This still does not explain how running out of gas is "one of the worst things". The owners manual which warns you against just about everything except to look both ways before crossing the street does not mention this. Or maybe I just didn't see it. And isn't the fuel pump located in a sump that always contains fuel at the bottom of the tank?
 
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