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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
I ordered new RAV4 Limited Hybrid (still waiting for delivery though).
Basically my question is if this car is reliable for 10+ years of normal driving (15k - 20k km/year).

I did found out about Priuses and how they can easily make 500k+ km without any serious issues on first battery.

I did not find some extensive "research" about RAV4, probably because of statistical sample is yet too small for now.

Currently I'm driving Mazda3 for eleven years now and I didn't had any issues until now, which was also a trigger to get a new car :)

Anyway, what are your thoughts on the new RAV4 being a part of the family for 10+ years? Is it doable?

Thanks,
Marko
 

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The hybrid drive train is all based on what the Prius has been using for many, many years. Rock solid.

The rest of the car is similar to RAV4's past, also rock solid.

I can't imagine this car not being extremely reliable.

Full Disclosure: My 2017 RAV4 Hybrid Limited is my third RAV4 and my 11th Toyota. Other than routine maintenance I have never had a vehicle failure that caused me to have it towed for service, or spend significant money for repairs. One of my cars, a 12 year old Avalon with 257,000 miles ran like new.
 

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IMO it should last well beyond that. My problem with the hybrid is replacing the batteries after 10 years and the cost associated with it. I could put free gas into my NA Rav another 40,000 miles for the cost of replacing batteries.
 

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Didn't know the batteries only last 10 years. I don't mind not being to glide in EV mode but it's nice to have the hybrid motor propel the vehicle from stand still, which is probably what aids the MPG the most.
 

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Didn't know the batteries only last 10 years. I don't mind not being to glide in EV mode but it's nice to have the hybrid motor propel the vehicle from stand still, which is probably what aids the MPG the most.
Very few batteries need to be replaced at 10 years. It *should* last the life of the car.
 

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Very few batteries need to be replaced at 10 years. It *should* last the life of the car.
You are correct. I work with someone with a First Generation Prius (1998) with the original battery pack and over 200k miles.

He states the batteries still charge cleanly and correctly with no noticeable change since he's had it.
 

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I don't think there is much certainty when it comes to battery life past 10 years. They say 10-15 years is the expected life, and there will be some the do and some that don't make it that long.
I worked with a guy that had 150,000 miles on a 1980 Toyota PU he bought brand new, and he bragged how he never (EVER) changed the oil. Nope, not even once since he owned it, just added a qt every 3-4K and kept driving. That doesn't mean that I would ever attempt or bank on something so insane myself though.
With battery chemistry it's more about charging and drain cycles, heat and cold than it is about mileage.
 

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Data obtained from hybrid batteries over the past 10 years is probably not indicative of expected performance over the next 10 years. Technology, materials and manufacturing all improve year by year. Life expectancy of a new hybrid battery is beyond the life expectancy of the rest of the car. I'm not sure why people always focus on the battery as the main issue for maintenance, but its not. Most cars on the road will nickel and dime the owner for far more money over the life of the car than a battery costs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for these answers. My soul is now at rest, now I know I made a good decision taking RAV4 (this will be my first car from Toyota).

One more question. Is it deliberately "only" cca. 170hp in this 2.5 L engine? Does this engine has a turbine (probably not). Is it somehow supercharged, eg. direct compression injection, etc?

Because it's odd to me, that 2.5L engine can squeeze "only" this much power. For example, Ford Mondeo with 1.0 L engine has 120hp.

If this means the engine will last even longer (without turbine, ...) then I'm fine with it.

And last question. On test ride, E-CVT transmission was a absolute pleasure to me, although this might be because this was my first time with e-cvt (or cvt in general). How is the transmission? I've heard a lot of complains from Honda users. Also, is the driving also this pleasant after few years, or does it get "boring"? I usually drive very calmly, but when I feel like it, I also like to step on the throttle, especially when overtaking on highway. Is e-cvt responsive enough for smooth yet fast acceleration?
That's all from me, I promise :)

Thanks again everyone,
Marko
 

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Actually the engine has less hp than that in the hybrid. I think it's 150 hp. The gas only rav4 is 176 hp. The hybrid engine is an atkinson engine which is part of the fuel savings. It is a more fuel efficient engine but at the cost of hp. But that's where the hybrid battery and motors make up the difference and then some. The total system output of the rav4 hybrid is 194 hp.
 

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With the TNGA platform that's getting automotive journalists excited, I can't wait for Toyota EVs to come to market. Come on RAV4 EV...
 

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I have an extreme commute which is one of the reasons I bought the hybrid as I have seen hybrids used as taxi cabs and I know they are fully capable of going many many miles. I am already over 47K miles without any issues. Next oil change coming up soon, but I have to say I am very impressed with it everything has been great so far
 

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IMO it should last well beyond that. My problem with the hybrid is replacing the batteries after 10 years and the cost associated with it. I could put free gas into my NA Rav another 40,000 miles for the cost of replacing batteries.
The battery concern is the most overblown criticism of hybrids out there. Could it "fail" at some point after the warranty? Sure, just like anything else. Is it expensive to have the Toyota dealer replace it? Yes, although much cheaper than some had speculated early in the Prius days. I believe the complete replacement at a dealer is in the $2,000-$2,500USD range (I heard early speculation from a lot of people that the battery replacement on a Prius would be in the $8k-$10k range) BUT you can have a refurbished battery replaced by somebody who will come to your house to do it for about $500 on a second or third gen Prius. It's very likely that by the time any of the Rav 4 Hybrid batteries fail the aftermarket folks will have similar solutions available. These are solid, reliable vehicles built on technology that Toyota has been improving for about 20 years now.
 

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IMO it should last well beyond that. My problem with the hybrid is replacing the batteries after 10 years and the cost associated with it. I could put free gas into my NA Rav another 40,000 miles for the cost of replacing batteries.
If the gas is free, why limit yourself to 40,000 miles? You could drive 400,000 miles with free gas for the same cost as driving 40,000 miles. ;-)
 
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