Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I ran into the typical p0401 and decided to move the vsv. Made a plug and play relocation harness from new parts which worked out well. The location of the stock one is such a pita. I used the center diff vsv just for now. Code fixed :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes of course it does. I wsa just fixing a code so I can pass smog. I don't want to buy a vsv when I can just repurpose one for testing. Anyhow, The stock one is very hard to get to which is why I moved it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
heh :) I might make a few of the extension harnesses if anyone's interested. The p0401 seems to be a common thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
Does the egr vsv affect CO2 emissions?
EGR affects NOx the most. EGR is designed to send burned inert exhaust gas back into the combustion chamber to cool it down.

CO is carbon monoxide and is affected by the fuel mixture

HC is hydrocarbons and is affected by a poor running engine. Just think that HC = Horrible Combustion

CO2 is a measure of efficiency - the higher the number the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
all your gearheads/mechanics/engineers with your fang dangled acronyms...
One of my sons is a cop in the Air Force. They have acronyms for acronyms

I belong to the AAAA - The Association Against Acronym Abuse "D
 

·
Registered
1998 Rav4, manual transmission, 2WD, JDM engine installed in 2013
Joined
·
758 Posts
-- I recently re-located my 2wd, 1998 Rav4's EGR VSV to the firewall just aft of and slightly below the EGR valve:

-- My Rav4.1's VSV was replaced in 2013 with an OEM Aisin one. The 2013 VSV failed recently, as indicated by first, bad resistance readings. (The spec is 33 to 39 ohms at room temp. My VSV was reading 140 ohms at room temp.) Second, when I applied 12 volts to the VSV's connector, I could hear the solenoid click, but blowing air into the VSV's EGR-port did not result in air blowing out the VSV's filter end. (The latter two tests are from the factory service manual.)

-- On the 2wd, using the original location of the EGR VSV, replacing the EGR VSV is like a 15 minute job. I did not even put my Rav4 on jack stands or ramps (but I am on the slim side, and it was a tight fit).

-- Nonetheless reports are that heat reduces the life of solenoid valves like the VSV. So like many have done, I decided to re-locate my Rav4's VSV to a cooler location. Like others, I found an unused bolt hole in the firewall and used it.

-- The original wire harness would not reach easily to the location shown. Like marcpanic above, I modified the harness. I added about a foot+ of wire, a male connector from the salvage yard, and a female connector that I purchased. Below are the parts used and guidance.

-- Get a female pigtail from a salvage yard, with about a foot+ of wire attached. Ebay sells pre-owned female pigtails, too. The Evap System VSV has the same female connector as the EGR VSV and is easier to get at, so I bought a pigtail from the Evap VSV. The female connector is Toyota OEM part number 90980-11156 (or just 11156). The "11156" is printed on the connector, which looks like the following:


-- Purchase an unpinned male connector from corsa-technic.com in Wisconsin. This cost me about $8 total. The part number is 90980-11155 (or just 11155 or Sumitomo part number TS090-2P-1). Corsa-technic includes the pins and rubber seals. Ebay and online parts dealers have this connector as well. I could not find any 11155 (male) connectors in the salvage yard. Here is the male connector as shown at https://www.corsa-technic.com/item.php?item_id=983":


-- I have a little experience with pinning and de-pinning. This video was a decent refresher:

-- I am not entirely happy with my pinning job. It was aggravating to complete. But the new harness does seem to fasten fine at both ends, with good electrical continuity.

-- If you do not want to deal with buying and pinning a male connector, then just splicing about a foot of wire, with heat shrink crimp connectors and heat shrink tubing on top of these, should be more than fine. Home Depot and Lowe's both have a good assortment of crimp connectors and heat shrink tubing.

-- To access the original connector and do the splicing with as much ease as possible, one has to pull apart some of the sheathing of the wire harness beneath the intake manifold.

-- While I was figuring out where to re-locate the VSV over a few days, I fastened the new VSV with a couple of zip ties. For the VSV's temporary, zip-tied location, I made sure it would hang horizontally and without banging around while I drove.

(The blue silicone vacuum hose is a modification I made recently, per the great thread by Eodgator at https://www.rav4world.com/threads/vacuum-line-replacement-with-high-temp-silicone-lines.255961/ .)
 
  • Like
Reactions: miles26
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top