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Discussion Starter #1
The exhaust is leaking from a joint in the pipe just after the J-downpipe, adjacent to the oil pan. It is producing some loud noises too.

The leak is right at the circumference of a weird looking circular coupling. There appears to be 2 knobby looking bolts on either side.

Can this be fixed by tightening the bolts or applying some fix-up muffler cement or tape?? I read that this joint is Toyota's way of connecting exhaust pipes.

I read about this common problem with Corollas. I dont want to take it to a shop to get it welded so it just comes off in another year. Plus they rip me off. I wanna do it myself.

thanks for any advice

Larry
btw.I've got a 1997 model.
 

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Had that problem earlier this year. I got a new one from Bosal but that's a rare find. Just looked at Toyotapartscheap.com and found this pipe for ya. Only $157. Not bad at all. Toyota normally charges over $350 for this pipe. I refused to pay that amount at the time. Still do too. :lol: Here's the link. Much better than welding it temporarily. BTW, I also painted my pipe blue with a high temp paint to help with corrosion from the winter and so far all is well.

http://www.trademotion.com/partlocator/index.cfm?action=getLocator&siteid=214001&chapter=APM812&appSectionid=7&groupid=60613&make=34&model=Rav4&year=1996&catalogid=1

Also, these guys are real good to deal with. I have nothing but praise for them. Just be aware it may take a short time (3 weeks max I would say) if they need to order it themselves (ie. not in stock). You can use the browser they have to search for the other stuff you will need to change it.

Gasket for front and rear of the pipe. Nuts that attach the pipe in the front are one-time use only so you'll need 3 of those. Hope this helps ya.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Ok thanks. But are you sure the whole front pipe needs to be replaced?? Maybe it's a front pipe gasket?

Why can't this be 'fixed' without replacing? The leak is coming right before the J-curve on the front pipe. What about those knobby looking bolts on the side...
 

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Those knobby looking things are pivot points on the pipe. When its detached it will actually move along that axis. There's no gasket in there it is one pipe all together. I'm not sure exactly how that works. If its on the coupler, or right near the joint of it on the pipe the weld just won't hold for long. Look at it like this. If there is a hole there, imagine the area around that hole. Its rusted badly too. In a matter of time that area will become a hole too, and the new weld you had put on that hole will just fall off when it does.

But believe me, you are much better off buying the pipe than playing around tyrying to repair it. I tried to have that spot reapired and it was gone in about 2 months. Its cake to change if you have someplace warm to do it. Or if you know someone in a muffler shop or garage that might do it for you on the side they shouldn't charge you much as it consists of unbolting the old and bolting in the new.

It's all up to you as what you do, but I prefer to get it done right the first time if I can afford it, rather than pay to have it fixed two or more times. Just me though.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your input. You are right, its not easy to tamper
with this front pipe joint with a band-aid solution. The
knoby bolts there are actually capped off with some metal
covers and theres no easy way to mess with this.

I have now finally clearly understood how this weird front
pipe joint works - I also closely inspected it today. The leak
isnt's a hole in the pipe, it's at this pivot coupling joint
seam. I read somewhere else there is an asbestos gasket
inside this coupling and that is not sitting right causing the
leak and/or the bolts are rusted and it's not as snug/tight
as new.

I got some more info from posting at
alt.autos.toyota.trucks. Here's what they said:

(1)
"...The joint is kind of like a ball and socket assembly, and
the knobby-lookingbolts on either side of the joint have
springs outside of the bolt to keep pressure on the joint. If
the exhaust leak is from the ball and socket part of the
joint, there is no easy way to repair it other than replacing
it. You can try tightening the bolts but they are probably
pretty rusted and will not turn..."


(2) "Sometimes these joints will leak because the springs on
the knobby looking bolts become a little weak due to
heat/cool cycles. If you spray the threads several time with
a penetrating oil, I like PB Blaster, take the joint apart
enough to clean any rust or other debris out of it, coat it
with dry-slide or some type of lube with graphite base to it,
and reassemble you can solve the leak. Don't tighten the
bolts until the springs are completely compressed or the
joint won't flex like it's designed to. You might want to
replace the springs while apart as well.
 
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