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2019 Hybrid Limited
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone figured this out for the 5th gen models yet? Other than wiring in a relay? I see a few threads in the 4.4 forum but nothing here. From what I can tell from just investigating with my meter is the relay that controls the high beam just controls a lens that moves in the light housing. The LED is the same low beam LED (At least on the limited hybrid trim)
Also it seems this relay is controlled by dropping or adding the negative to the relay. The positive is constant so I dont want to mess with the control side of the relay. I can make it work by adding another relay but I thought there might be a cleaner way of doing it so there isn't wires jumpered from the OEM relays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well I wired it up with a relay. Works well and I feel much better driving at night now. Much more light on the road. I wish it came with quad lights, and would keep the low beams on when you use high beam like my Ram truck did. With this single LED per side and just actuating a lens to bring the beam up higher, you lose a lot of illumination. I'm not sure how the other trim levels do high beam but I hope its better than the limited. The fuse box is getting full lol.
 

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Well I wired it up with a relay. Works well and I feel much better driving at night now. Much more light on the road. I wish it came with quad lights, and would keep the low beams on when you use high beam like my Ram truck did. With this single LED per side and just actuating a lens to bring the beam up higher, you lose a lot of illumination. I'm not sure how the other trim levels do high beam but I hope its better than the limited. The fuse box is getting full lol.
Where did you tap-in to the high-beam—what wire was it? Did you end up tapping into the negative wire?
 

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2021 Limited Hybrid
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Anyone figured this out for the 5th gen models yet? Other than wiring in a relay? I see a few threads in the 4.4 forum but nothing here. From what I can tell from just investigating with my meter is the relay that controls the high beam just controls a lens that moves in the light housing. The LED is the same low beam LED (At least on the limited hybrid trim)
Also it seems this relay is controlled by dropping or adding the negative to the relay. The positive is constant so I dont want to mess with the control side of the relay. I can make it work by adding another relay but I thought there might be a cleaner way of doing it so there isn't wires jumpered from the OEM relays.
That is a Federal regulation that requires fog lights to shut off when high beams are on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That is a Federal regulation that requires fog lights to shut off when high beams are on.
I'm sure you're correct, as all the newer vehicles I've owned do exactly that. There is no oncoming traffic when I use them, so I want them on. There's probably a regulation that says we cant swap halogens for led's in the fog lights too, or modify turn signals, add wheel spacers, tint windows,.....etc.etc.
 

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I'm sure you're correct, as all the newer vehicles I've owned do exactly that. There is no oncoming traffic when I use them, so I want them on. There's probably a regulation that says we cant swap halogens for led's in the fog lights too, or modify turn signals, add wheel spacers, tint windows,.....etc.etc.
He is correct. You are right, what you do with you car afterwards is up to you! LOL. We get the LEDs in regular halogen lamps down here in FL all the time and it is annoying. However, cops are pulling anyone over for bright lights.
 

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That is a Federal regulation that requires fog lights to shut off when high beams are on.
That is true. However, that does not mean that it is correct. It is not so much that the fog lights go off with the high beams, it is worded something like "fog lights are enabled only when low beam headlights are on".

I drive some dark, narrow roads at times. When the high beams are on, the ditches are DARK. The fog lights fill in the sides quite nicely. I actually prefer to call them "ditch lights".

Also, in the case of fog or heavy snow, it is possible that even the low beams are causing too much glare. It would be nice to have fog (snow?) lights available when the marker lights are on to prevent the glare from the low beams. Granted, this is a limited-use situation, not for everyday driving, but it is a situation that I see often enough to want to enable it. I have done the modification to my wife's '02 RAV, am now looking for a way to do the same thing to my '18 Sienna.


There's probably a regulation that says we cant swap halogens for led's in the fog lights too, or modify turn signals, add wheel spacers, tint windows,.....etc.etc.
I realize that you were probable tongue-in-cheek with that comment, but you were not far off. It is actually legal to put LEDs in fog lights, but you can NOT (legally) put LEDs in headlights that were designed for incandescent bulbs. The reasoning behind that is simply physics. The reflector/lens assembly requires the light source (incandescent filament) to be in a particular PRECISE location. Some of the newer LEDs are getting better at approximating that, but most of them (especially the cheaper ones) just put a bunch of emitters in there and call it good. This spreads the light into areas where it is not intended, causing glare for oncoming drivers, which can be downright hazardous. It is also quite likely that the beam pattern projected is less than adequate, meaning that the LED conversion is actually a downgrade.

As for the other items, it's a mix of physics and common sense. Turn signal modification? Maybe different color bulbs? Not sure what else is easily changed. Wheel spacers can change the load on the bearings if the same wheels are used. If the spacers are needed to compensate for a different offset in the wheels, great. Window tint? Generally allowed, depending on window location and tint density. Common sense says you don't want to reduce visibility where it's needed, but common sense is getting rarer and rarer nowadays.

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That it true. However, that does not mean that it is correct. It is not so much that the fog lights go off with the high beams, it is worded something like "fog lights are enabled only when low beam headlights are on".

I drive some dark, narrow roads at times. When the high beams are on, the ditches are DARK. The fog lights fill in the sides quite nicely. I actually prefer to call them "ditch lights".

Also, in the case of fog or heavy snow, it is possible that even the low beams are causing too much glare. It would be nice to have fog (snow?) lights available when the marker lights are on to prevent the glare from the low beams. Granted, this is a limited-use situation, not for everyday driving, but it is a situation that I see often enough to want to enable it. I have done the modification to my wife's '02 RAV, am now looking for a way to do the same thing to my '18 Sienna.



I realize that you were probable tongue-in-cheek with that comment, but you were not far off. It is actually legal to put LEDs in fog lights, but you can NOT (legally) put LEDs in headlights that were designed for incandescent bulbs. The reasoning behind that is simply physics. The reflector/lens assembly requires the light source (incandescent filament) to be in a particular PRECISE location. Some of the newer LEDs are getting better at approximating that, but most of them (especially the cheaper ones) just put a bunch of emitters in there and call it good. This spreads the light into areas where it is not intended, causing glare for oncoming drivers, which can be downright hazardous. It is also quite likely that the beam pattern projected is less than adequate, meaning that the LED conversion is actually a downgrade.

As for the other items, it's a mix of physics and common sense. Turn signal modification? Maybe different color bulbs? Not sure what else is easily changed. Wheel spacers can change the load on the bearings if the same wheels are used. If the spacers are needed to compensate for a different offset in the wheels, great. Window tint? Generally allowed, depending on window location and tint density. Common sense says you don't want to reduce visibility where it's needed, but common sense is getting rarer and rarer nowadays.

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Sure on the LEDs in fog lights, if you only use them in fog. Where I am, most people leave the fogs on all the time, and often the LED-retrofitted fog glare is worse than the headlights
 

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I know it's mostly the "elite" of us (who know what we are doing) against all the other "dolts" out there (who don't), but it should be a rather simple matter of AIMING THE LIGHTS. You can't simply slap the new bulbs in there, but the "dolts" either don't know that or just don't care.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know it's mostly the "elite" of us (who know what we are doing) against all the other "dolts" out there (who don't), but it should be a rather simple matter of AIMING THE LIGHTS. You can't simply slap the new bulbs in there, but the "dolts" either don't know that or just don't care.

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There's some truth to what you are saying absolutely. The problem (I'm sure most of us know this) with a lot of retrofit bulbs is they don't have the focal point the same as OEM. This was (and still is) really bad with retrofitting HID in place of halogen. At least some of the manufacturers of the LED bulbs are now placing the chips identical the where the halogen filament was on the OEM set up. This helps a bunch, but I know all of us have experienced the bleed of bad retrofit bulbs. Even if you try to aim them there is bleed blaring out everywhere, because the focal point is incorrect. This makes it tough for oncoming traffic. Especially when they are more than double the lumen output of what they are replacing....:rolleyes:
 

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Sealight H11 bulbs are supposed to have the same focal aiming point as the OEM halogens. See video with halogen aiming point at beginning and the Sealight at about 3 minutes 40 seconds.
 

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This is a really good read on LED retrofits in halogen housings. One of the interested take-aways is the frequently overstated lumens ratings of LED bulbs. The other is the light pattern scattering.


As an aside, my aftermarket (halogen) fog light kit was aimed practically at the sky when installed. I had to crank the aiming screw about 30 times to get it to the right location
 
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