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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I changed my Rav4’s front brakes the other day and notice something disturbing, something that wasn’t noticeable without paying specific attention to it! The front brake lines looked OK from the top:



But look at the same hose when bent in other direction:





I considered buying stainless steel braded hoses, but in the end bought a pair from Advance Auto for around $13 each (after coupons, normal price is $25 per side). PNs BHA380901 and BHA380902 (they are different from side to side)



At this point (car age), you should be thinking of replacing your hoses with your next brake job! Especially considering the price!
 
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Also FLUSH YOUR BRAKE FLUID!!! Right now I am dealing with both front calipers "dragging" and wearing out pads at an exponential rate because the fluid has not been flushed, which has caused acid corrosion in both front calipers. As a result, they aren't fully retracting when brakes aren't being used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Right, I ended up flushing the front brakes (but not the rears). I suspect that my brakes must also drag, because I my fuel economy went down by almost 2 mpg...
 

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Nice one Leon, i'm just about to take your advice, mine are cracked too, just got replacements today, bit of an issue however, they did not come with new copper gaskets for the banjos, when i queried this the reply was "most people just use the old ones" nonsense i know.

Another slight prob is i can find no torque settings for the banjo bolt in my manual, may i ask what torque if any you used.

many thanks,
salt.
 

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Great thread & contributions ^^^^

Just wanted to share:
- below is improved brake tubing, that more & more garages have switched to, here in Canada
- well worth a small premium in $$
NiCopp® « Product Categories « AGS Company

NiCopp® is a nickel-copper alloy brake tubing that meets SAE Standard J1047 and ISO 4038, meeting all international and U.S. requirements for brake tubing. This alloy is approximately 9.2% nickel, 1.4% iron, 0.8% manganese, and 88.6% copper. Under the UNS system, this alloy is designated as UNS C70600. NiCopp® therefore has the strength and structural integrity of steel lines, but with the added benefit of being much more corrosion resistant. NiCopp® is also easier to bend and form than steel tubing. Nickel-copper, commonly referred to as '90-10 copper', has been used on several European vehicle brake systems since the 1970's, including: Volvo, Audi, Porsche, and Aston Martin.

NiCopp® has been used on hydraulic/fluid transfer systems on vehicles where steel lines and tubing are commonly used. This includes brake, fuel and transmission systems. NiCopp® is considered the super-premium brand in brake lines and should be considered where the underbody of the vehicle is subjected to the harshest environments, where the longest life-span for lines is required, and/or where direct OEM replacement is desired.

• NiCopp® Does Not Rust or Corrode
• DOT Approved for Hydraulic Brake Systems
• Bends 58% Easier than Steel Tubing
• Available in Coils of 25', 50', and 100'
• Finished Lines Available for Domestic & Import
• Black Oxide Fittings 2X Corrosion Resistance
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another slight prob is i can find no torque settings for the banjo bolt in my manual, may i ask what torque if any you used.


My Advance Auto part hoses came with new crush washers, but... I have re-used those on many prior occasions without any problems. If you are going to have a problem, you will see it leaking right away and then, you will have to do deal with it. Just make sure everything is clean and give it a shot.


As for torque, I never bother to measure it in this location. I usually just go with my experience. If I had to guess, I would say you put around 15-20 ft*lbs.
 

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Thanks for the reply Leon,

I went ahead and used the old washers, i torqued them up to 23lb, it felt as tho' it could go a bit higher but i read a thread on the other toyota forum (think it was a corolla tho') where he broke the bolt going to 25lb... so i resisted the temptation of going higher.
It was getting dark as i was finishing so i'll check tomorrow for leaks, for bleeding i used one of those vacuum pistol things (cheapo ebay version, works great) and kept sucking thru until i was getting fresh fluid.

thanks again for your very detailed posting, the pics and info' were of great help to me, as i'm sure they will be to many others also.
 
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