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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Absolutely delighted owner of a 2020 XSE hybrid purchased at Thanksgiving, and since this is Montana, winter tires are a must. I splurged and bought a wheel-tire set from Tire Rack, but before purchasing, called TR to ask specifically about making sure the TPMS sensors would work with my vehicle.

Local installer who received the kit couldn't get his device to read the sensors. I took the vehicle with new winter kit to Les Schwab; the tech there said he could read the sensors, but couldn't get the codes into the vehicle. (Of course, by now I'm living with the little TPWS alert on the MID. Separate rant: I'd sure as hell rather see actual tire pressures than just a TWPS.)

So I take the XSE to the local Toyota service dept., who quote me $120 for one hour of parts & labor (parts?? wtf? -- Schwab would have charged $20, if they could get the vehicle to see the sensors) in order to (a) read the sensors and program the codes for the winter wheel-tire set, and (b) set up the 2 sets of codes so I can switch back and forth. But I need the original set of wheels-tires to do part (b), which are not with me, so I leave without doing anything (and without paying $120).
QUESTIONS:

1. Can I even set up 2 sets of codes?? My VIN starts with "2", which I think is Canada. A close (and somewhat confusing) scrutiny of the manual suggests only Japan-made vehicles have this capability...??

2. Should it really be this hard to set up the Rav to see a set of aftermarket sensors??? What am I doing wrong?!

ANY thoughts welcome! thanks to all for the wisdom on this forum...I lurked for a while before making my purchase and am grateful for the deep experience here.
 

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You should probably talk to Tirerack support since they sold you the package. Explain that neither the primary installer nor Les Schwab can get it to work.

On the 2019 XSE you can view the tire pressure in the Toyota app, at least for iOS. The app is simply called “Toyota”. The separate “Toyota Remote Connect” app seems to be deprecated and won’t display tire pressure. Presumably this also works on the 2020.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
These work just fine on my 2020. Dealer was able to initialize them no problem and I doubt the presence of the OEM wheels/tires was even at play.

The problem isn't whether the dealer can see the sensors (which are already purchased, installed to the wheels, and encased in TR tires). The problems are (a) being charged $120 to see the TR tire-wheel kit and program them into my vehicle by the dealer, and (b) whether my vehicle supports 2 sets of codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You should probably talk to Tirerack support since they sold you the package. Explain that neither the primary installer nor Les Schwab can get it to work.

On the 2019 XSE you can view the tire pressure in the Toyota app, at least for iOS. The app is simply called “Toyota”. The separate “Toyota Remote Connect” app seems to be deprecated and won’t display tire pressure. Presumably this also works on the 2020.
Will try both and report back. I'm assuming the Toyota app won't display tire pressure if it hasn't yet recognized the sensors, though...?
 

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The problem isn't whether the dealer can see the sensors (which are already purchased, installed to the wheels, and encased in TR tires). The problems are (a) being charged $120 to see the TR tire-wheel kit and program them into my vehicle by the dealer, and (b) whether my vehicle supports 2 sets of codes.
Your vehicle can store 10 codes.

The unhappy reality is that your dealership can charge you for the process. My dealer quoted $100 (but it would appear that they swallowed that as part of delivery prep).

The good news? It only has to be done one time, unless you upgrade sensors in the future.

I don't see where this is the fault of Tire Rack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your vehicle can store 10 codes.

The unhappy reality is that your dealership can charge you for the process. My dealer quoted $100 (but it would appear that they swallowed that as part of delivery prep).

The good news? It only has to be done one time, unless you upgrade sensors in the future.

I don't see where this is the fault of Tire Rack.
I'm fine with them charging to store multiple codes, if that can be done -- can you point me to the reference that talks about storing 10 codes? The main reason I bought a whole kit from TR, instead of just swapping tires off the wheels each season (as I've done previously), is so that codes could be programmed in for each set and I could swap the summer and winter sets myself once this has been done. The dealer tech said he had to go research whether the 2020 could even store two sets of codes, as that was apparently news to him.

I don't know whether anything is TR's fault -- I'm trying to sort out whether getting the vehicle to see the new codes can only be done at the dealer, AND whether my (made-in-Canada?) vehicle can store two sets of codes so that I can swap the wheel sets myself in the future.
 

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I'm fine with them charging to store multiple codes, if that can be done -- can you point me to the reference that talks about storing 10 codes? The main reason I bought a whole kit from TR, instead of just swapping tires off the wheels each season (as I've done previously), is so that codes could be programmed in for each set and I could swap the summer and winter sets myself once this has been done. The dealer tech said he had to go research whether the 2020 could even store two sets of codes, as that was apparently news to him.

I don't know whether anything is TR's fault -- I'm trying to sort out whether getting the vehicle to see the new codes can only be done at the dealer, AND whether my (made-in-Canada?) vehicle can store two sets of codes so that I can swap the wheel sets myself in the future.
I cannot speak to Canadian vehicles.

The US info can be found in the manual, pages 585-587. I found this (which may explain the Canada issue):

• “Change Wheel” (for models made in Japan* without tire inflation pressure display function)
Select to change the tire pressure warning system sensor ID code set. To enable this function, a second set of tire pressure warning system sensor ID codes must be registered by a Toyota dealer. For information regarding changing the registered ID code set, contact your Toyota dealer.

Sorry, that's the best I can do. My RAV was built in Japan to US specs and my sensors are working as designed. Wish I could be of further assistance.
 

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Absolutely delighted owner of a 2020 XSE hybrid purchased at Thanksgiving, and since this is Montana, winter tires are a must. I splurged and bought a wheel-tire set from Tire Rack, but before purchasing, called TR to ask specifically about making sure the TPMS sensors would work with my vehicle.

Local installer who received the kit couldn't get his device to read the sensors. I took the vehicle with new winter kit to Les Schwab; the tech there said he could read the sensors, but couldn't get the codes into the vehicle. (Of course, by now I'm living with the little TPWS alert on the MID. Separate rant: I'd sure as hell rather see actual tire pressures than just a TWPS.)

So I take the XSE to the local Toyota service dept., who quote me $120 for one hour of parts & labor (parts?? wtf? -- Schwab would have charged $20, if they could get the vehicle to see the sensors) in order to (a) read the sensors and program the codes for the winter wheel-tire set, and (b) set up the 2 sets of codes so I can switch back and forth. But I need the original set of wheels-tires to do part (b), which are not with me, so I leave without doing anything (and without paying $120).
QUESTIONS:

1. Can I even set up 2 sets of codes?? My VIN starts with "2", which I think is Canada. A close (and somewhat confusing) scrutiny of the manual suggests only Japan-made vehicles have this capability...??

2. Should it really be this hard to set up the Rav to see a set of aftermarket sensors??? What am I doing wrong?!

ANY thoughts welcome! thanks to all for the wisdom on this forum...I lurked for a while before making my purchase and am grateful for the deep experience here.
Question:
Is Les Schwab an approved installer for Tire Rack? This could be TRs problem if they sold you unreadable TPMS modules.
This is yet another reason I hate the requirement of this useless, POS technology.
 

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POS tech? My Honda's TPMS sensors are auto learning. OEM sensors or quality aftermarket and all you need to do is drive the vehicle and they connect and work. They also do a good job of letting me know if I have an issue with any tire(s) and lasted close to 10 years before needing replacement. Happy to have them.

Perhaps it's Toyota's system rather than the technology that's really the POS?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Question:
Is Les Schwab an approved installer for Tire Rack? This could be TRs problem if they sold you unreadable TPMS modules.
This is yet another reason I hate the requirement of this useless, POS technology.
It probably wasn't clear in my original post, but the approved TR installer, a very small local outfit, couldn't read the sensors -- something about his device needing to be updated for 2020. I then tried Schwab in the hopes that they could read the sensors; they were able to read them, but unable to get the vehicle to recognize them.
 

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Don't expect the Toyota app to display tire pressure on 2020 models, several 2020 owners have posted that it doesn't work on their 2020s unfortunately and this has been confirmed by Toyota Customer Service. But be aware that if an app update gets it working, it only display warm temp after it's been driven, been using it for months now, actual cold tire pressure is 38psi, the app always shows 39psi at a minimum, up to a max of 41psi.
 

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It sounds like TR sold you some incorrect sensors. Could be very well the warehouse jockey installed the wrong sensors and not the rep itself. I am sure they would make it right. Give them a chance.
 

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I will say that I just put some aftermarket wheels and tires on my 2020, sensors provided by TireRack. I had made the mistake of having the tires mounted without taking photos of the sensors. (I made the mistake of thinking there was an auto relearn process.)

So, I tried using a TPMS tool (Autel) to activate (wake) the sensor and scan it. Was unable wake using the tool, had to drive around with a laptop to capture the IDs.

Once I had the IDs, I was able to active them in the ECU with a scan tool.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
...
So, I tried using a TPMS tool (Autel) to activate (wake) the sensor and scan it. Was unable wake using the tool, had to drive around with a laptop to capture the IDs.

Once I had the IDs, I was able to active them in the ECU with a scan tool.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
OK, this sounds totally intriguing, but I have no idea what any of this means: what did you have on your laptop to capture the IDs while driving? What is the "ECU", and what is a scan tool? I'm totally ignorant of how to achieve this, but would sure like to replicate your success!
 

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OK, this sounds totally intriguing, but I have no idea what any of this means: what did you have on your laptop to capture the IDs while driving? What is the "ECU", and what is a scan tool? I'm totally ignorant of how to achieve this, but would sure like to replicate your success!
This is really beyond the scope of the forum, but for the technically inclined:

I have a Macbook with RTL-SDR software. To receive the tire pressure sensors signal, it requires some special hardware and some free software. I use a USB device originally intended for receiving TV signals, but programmers have figured a way to use it as a software defined radio.

Search Amazon for RTL2832U, for the hardware piece required. It is about $30 if you buy it from Amazon with an antenna. Look for one that has good reviews.

On the MacBook, I'm running Homebrew, and I originally installed homebrew-sdr. It has an old version of a software called rtl_433.

The older version of the software cannot decode Toyota sensors, the latest version can. You would need to figure out how to install the latest version of the software.

I then ran the software asking it to listen to 315mhz (the frequency of the Toyota Pacific sensors), and it spit out a bunch of messages that look like this:

Code:
time      : 2019-12-10 12:05:01
model     : Toyota       type      : TPMS          id        : f9239383
status    : 128          pressure_PSI: 33.250      temperature_C: 7.000
mic       : CRC
There were some discussions that the id number that it spits out is incorrect as the sensor ID can only be 7 hexidecimal characters, not 8. Someone on another RAV4 board has figured out that you just discard the first letter.

I received about 23-25 of these messages from all 4 of the different sensors during a 15 minute drive.

The "ECU" is technically Engine Control Unit, and I guess I'm using the term incorrectly because the TPMS computer is technically a separate control unit, not an engine control unit.

Once you have the ID numbers, you can code the ID numbers into the TPMS controller using Toyota Techstream (their software), or something "cheap" like Carista (works with your phone), or something more expensive like a specialty computer from a company like Autel or ATEQ.

The easiest thing for someone non-technical to do would be to obtain the ID codes by visually looking at the sensors (unmount the tires if needed.) Verify that the sensors are the correct frequency and the correct part for the car, and code the IDs into the car using a special tool. Specialty tire shops should be able to handle all of those things for you.
 

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It probably wasn't clear in my original post, but the approved TR installer, a very small local outfit, couldn't read the sensors -- something about his device needing to be updated for 2020. I then tried Schwab in the hopes that they could read the sensors; they were able to read them, but unable to get the vehicle to recognize them.
Even though my system is working, I’m always checking mine with gauges.
RANT ALERT...
This just should not be happening. It’s a stupid tire pressure measurement system! Given all the mods being done on this forum, this is the one that needs someone to find a way to stop this system from showing a light when it’s off. Get these stupid devices off the wheels, stop the light, and just check your tire pressures manually! END RANT.
 

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POS tech? My Honda's TPMS sensors are auto learning. OEM sensors or quality aftermarket and all you need to do is drive the vehicle and they connect and work. They also do a good job of letting me know if I have an issue with any tire(s) and lasted close to 10 years before needing replacement. Happy to have them.

Perhaps it's Toyota's system rather than the technology that's really the POS?
Clearly, this isn’t always true. If that were the case, this thread wouldn’t be here. If it were just an option, I’d have no problem but the fact that it’s a requirement sticks in my craw.
It’s a totally unneeded tech if you know how to use a tire gauge and keep an eye on your tires. I’ve heard horror stories from a number of manufacturers so it isn’t just Toyota.
 
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