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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

New guy here with a simple question: I'm trying to install a small tube in the filler neck of my gas tank (99 Rav4L) so I can siphon gas for my mower and discovered a check valve in the inlet of the tank in addition to the one under the cap. Can anyone tell me it's purpose? If I run a tube into the tank it'll stay open and I wonder what the consequences will be. Thank you.

Rick A
 

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I think most gas tanks have them now. In case the vehicle gets in an accident and goes turtle, it keeps the gas from spewing out. It's mounted in the tank because sometimes the filler tube gets pulled/broken off.
 

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In addition to the check valve issue, siphoning out of your tank is a best messy and at worst dangerous. Why not buy one of the new plastic gas "cans" that seal 100% and keep it with the mower. Also give you spare gas for the car in a pinch.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both for your replies. Sounds like I won't be risking anything.

I already have a gas can but if I don't use it fast enough it goes bad (here in Hawaii they put ethanol in the gas) and doesn't do the carbs any good on the lawn equipment. What's in the car will always be fresh.

Rick A
 

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I agree with Dr. Dyno especially about the risk of siphoning gas. One unintended spark and the siphoner and the vehicle both could be toast. It is not as warm here as in Hawaii but our gas also unfortunately has 10% ethanol and I have stored it for up to a year with no problems - if worried, one can use some gasoline conditioner, but I have not had to so far. No problems with the carbs on our four pieces of lawn care equipment, and one has been in use since 1991.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I suspect driving the car in traffic is more hazardous to one's health than siphoning gas from it.

I haven't had problems in the past with old gas but quite a few people I've read or heard indicate that it's a problem. Right now a riding mower, string trimmer and walk-behind string trimmer are all giving me problems and I can't find the causes of any of them, causing me to suspect the gas. Could be wrong (I often am!)

Another reason to install the siphon tube is the occasions in the past when I ran out and had to go all the way into town, burning more gas than I needed for the mower.

Rick
 

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I was a hospital chaplain's assistant in a large teaching hospital with an ER, and I saw a couple of guys who had been brought in after being burned in gasoline siphoning incidents. They were in agony which was lessened only by pain relief injections. One had also managed to cause extensive fire damage to his home as the ambulance people reported. Before that I occasionally used to siphon gas for use in our push-type lawn mower. After those incidents I decided that siphoning wasn't worth the possible injury and damage hazards. But of course that's an individual decision.
 

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I'm curious. Could you elaborate on exactly what caused the fires? I don't see why siphoning should be any more dangerous than any other kind of handling of flammable liquids, assuming proper precautions. Were you privy to the accident reports or accounts by the victims? Thanks.

Rick
 

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The problem with most solvents and fuels is that they are not very electrically conductive and when they are in motion (ie moving through a hose) they can generate a static charge. This becomes an issue when it gets close to something that is earthed as the charge can create a spark. All fuel pumping equipment will be earthed for this reason, including the hoses, allowing any charge to dissipate safely as it is generated. Most syphoning pumps have cheap plastic hoses that insulate the cars tank from the container being filled allowing a difference in charge to be generated increasing the risk of spark at an open container of fuel.
 

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The problem with most solvents and fuels is that they are not very electrically conductive and when they are in motion (ie moving through a hose) they can generate a static charge. This becomes an issue when it gets close to something that is earthed as the charge can create a spark. All fuel pumping equipment will be earthed for this reason, including the hoses, allowing any charge to dissipate safely as it is generated. Most syphoning pumps have cheap plastic hoses that insulate the cars tank from the container being filled allowing a difference in charge to be generated increasing the risk of spark at an open container of fuel.
Holy Cow! You expect me to believe this??? REALLY? :doh: Maybe it's time to attach magnets to the hoses.
 

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I'm the lazy type, I would tee-off the fuel system with a positive lock ball valve to a pressure rated fuel-hose with a brass end cap. If I used it a couple of times a year I would also add a momentary switch under the hood to activate the fuel-pump.

Then pop the hood, with the car off, uncap the hose and insert into your gas can,
open the ball-valve,
activate the switch and fill the can.
The hose cap not only helps keep things clean, it acts a secondary seal in the rare case the ball valve leaks.
The car has an electric fuel pump why not use it?
 
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