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have a 2015 RAV4 limited.
A few days ago, a family member was in a frontal collision with another vehicle. And when the tow truck towed the car back home, it looked bad.
Family member is doing okay but has a few bruises.
My concern is, why did no airbags deploy? It was a 40mph collision.
Damages:
  • Hood
  • Bumper
  • Fender
  • Driver side Door
  • Headlights(driver side headlight was destroyed while passenger side headlight has tabs broken off)
  • Radiator fan broken
  • Radiator broken
  • Radiator support broken
  • Windshield broken
  • Wiper blades bent
  • Condenser broken
  • etc.
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2015 has good crash ratings except for the small offset passenger, glad they're Ok. That doesn't look like 40mph damage, speed before the accident could have been 40mph, but at impact is was less, below the threshold for bag deployment. IIHS uses 40mph in their testing IIRC.


 

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According NHTSA, airbag should go off hitting a solid, fixed barrier at 8 to 14 mph.
If that threshold was met, then its most likely defective parts which warrants a recall.
 

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According NHTSA, airbag should go off hitting a solid, fixed barrier at 8 to 14 mph.
If that threshold was met, then its most likely defective parts which warrants a recall.
That's only part of the criteria for airbag deployment, a car is NOT a solid, fixed barrier, it's not static, it can be much smaller than the impacting vehicle and can be hit at an angle and can be moving in the same direction, all of which reduce impact. The accelerometer sensors and air bag ECU determine whether air bag deployment is required or not, they don't simply deploy in any impact, deployment of air bags themselves can cause more injury than a moderate collision when the occupant is properly belted in.

The entire statement below is from the actual NHTSA site, not just part of it.

Frontal air bags are generally designed to deploy in "moderate to severe" frontal or near-frontal crashes, which are defined as crashes that are equivalent to hitting a solid, fixed barrier at 8 to 14 mph or higher. (This would be equivalent to striking a parked car of similar size at about 16 to 28 mph or higher.)

 

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Look at the crashbar, its practically untouched. This was a high hit, with little to no damage to the frame. Looks like they ran into the back corner of a truck or semi. With no crumple zone to slow the car down indicates the point of impact was relatively low speed, just lots of visible damage. They probably stood on the brakes trying to slow down and simply ran out of road.
 
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