Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
I think he might be talking about the maximum amount of torque transfer to the front and rear.
In my opinion, both engines are pretty similar. Toyota's VVT-I is similar to Honda's i-VTEC, both continuious variable valve timing. I still think that Honda makes the best engines, but Toyota is closing in fast. Beside the engine, Toyota make everything else better than Honda.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
allows steering in the right direction only
Are you sure about this? It sounds like it could be really dangerous as ' steering in the right direction only" could be in the path of an 18 wheeler :shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
Omega Man said:
allows steering in the right direction only
Are you sure about this? It sounds like it could be really dangerous as ' steering in the right direction only" could be in the path of an 18 wheeler :shock:
Look at it this way, If you were sliding to the right and you turn your steering wheel shaply to the left to aviod that 18 wheeler. You will continue to slide to the right anyways because you have no traction. So you will hit that 18 wheeler anyways. You should always steer into the direction of the slide until you have gain traction back, then you correct your steering, this will give you a better chance of avioding that accident. The RAV4's VSC does all that for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Well, being someone that has had 3 Japanese brand vehicles within recent years, here's my 2 cents.

The 3 cars that I've had are:

-- 2002 Mazda Protege5
-- 2004 Honda Element EX AWD
-- 2006 Toyota Rav4 I-4 Sport 4x4

Let me rate these in some categories here with some explanation:

-- overall best fit & finish: Mazda Protege5

This thing was great. The only thing that was replaced under warranty was a fog light bulb. Also, there was one fault in the interior that I remember--a trim panel in the passenger seat footwell would sometimes pop out on one side. But overall, the fit and finish were great. The Honda would have some creaks more so during the winter, and there was a popping sound in the rear that never completely went away. Also, the driver's seat would rock before they fixed it. The floor material may have bubbled up some in the front (of course, maybe it was always this way, but perhaps not). The Toyota has creaks that annoy me, and I've had multiple problems with the stereo. The HVAC controls and buttons and radio buttons don't feel as high quality as the Honda, either. The Mazda had a leather-wrapped stearing wheel, whereas the Honda and Toyota don't. The plastic floor in the Honda scratched easily. All have decent quality seat fabric. The Honda has the nicest headliner.

-- drivetrain: Honda Element and Toyota RAV4

The Mazda's drivetrain was good, but noisy. The Honda and Toyota seem fairly comparable--they are both noisy, but not as loud as the Mazda. I like the shifter on the Toyota. The Toyota cruises smoother than the Honda.

-- audio: Honda Element

The stereo in the Honda was my favorite. It has very good sound, unless you're sitting in the back. The controls felt nice, and I never had any major problems with it. There was a separate adjustment for the subwoofer, too. The Mazda was a good stereo, too. It just didn't sound as great as the Honda and Toyota. I have been having problems with the Toyota one, however.

-- ergonomics: Toyota RAV4

The Toyota wins this one, though it's not perfect. The Mazda was small. The driving position was ok, but not the best for a tall person as myself, because my leg would touch the wheel sometimes. The backseat was small, too. The Honda, though very spacious, didn't have the best ergonomics, either. I had a similar problem as mentioned above with the Mazda for the driver's seat. Also, the back seats weren't the easiest to access due to the suicide doors and step up in height. The Toyota is roomy and feels sporty to drive--reminds me of a combo between the Mazda and Honda. The passenger seat feels like it's not tilted back far enough (the seat bottom). The Mazda and Toyota hold the driver better in corners than does the Honda. Also, the Honda does not have a center console. It has captain's chairs up front, which means no storage in a center armrest. The auxilary audio jack is also located in a better location in the Toyota than the Honda. The seats are much easier to fold in the Toyota than the Honda, and they even fold better than the Mazda. It's also nice to have the underfloor storage in the Toyota.

-- safety: Toyota RAV4

Toyota wins this hands-down. This is the safest car I've ever owned. The Honda did beat out the Mazda, though. The Mazda didn't have antilock brakes or AWD or EBD, which the Honda did. And of course, the RAV4 adds to that list, along with possibly a better crash-test rating.

-- fuel consumption: Mazda Protege5

Of course the Mazda will win this, because it has a smaller engine and is a lighter car. But the Element and RAV4 seem to get similar mileage, despite the EPA ratings being different. This is another RAV4 disappointment, because the Honda was rated at 21-24 and the Toyota is rated at 22-28. I only seem to be getting slightly better mileage on the Toyota. The best so far is between 26-27, and I got around that with my Element before, and it has the lower rating, is less aerodynamic, and is heavier. I still haven't reached that 28 MPG on the RAV4 yet, but perhaps this summer when it's even more broken in and it's warmer out.

-- warranty: Mazda Protege5

The Mazda had the best bumper-to-bumper warranty (3 yrs/50,000 miles), but at least the Toyota has the best powertrain warranty. The Honda loses on both counts here.

-- standard equipment: Toyota Rav4

'Nuf said.

Anyway, overall I'm still impressed with the Mazda. It seemed to me like maybe Honda and Toyota are overrated. The Mazda and Toyota were mostly Japanese, whereas the Honda was 3/4 USA. I like the RAV4--it seems to fit me good. I just expect more from Honda and Toyota, and they haven't completely met my expectations. Perhaps they'll get better with time, since the Mazda, though a new model to the US, had been built elsewhere, and the Proteges had been around for a while, so perhaps time to work the bugs out. The Element was only in its second model year, and the RAV4 is brand new. And I know that certain problems are minor (creaks and stereo) compared to others (drivetrain, etc.), it's still annoying and perhaps disappointing.

I would hope the dealer would be able to easily fix the stereo issues, but I'm not so sure about the creaks, etc.

As far as the CR-V versus the new RAV4, I would pick the RAV4. The CR-V's design is older and, while still a good vehicle, I would still pick the RAV4 over it. What would be a better comparison is when the new CR-V comes out later this year. The current one has some advantages over the RAV4.2, such as interior space, and perhaps those might be better compared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,348 Posts
good post rab but would like to comment on a few..

Rav4 is ALL Japanese. 100% built and all components supplied by Japan... According to the window sticker...

We get 30 mpg on the highway all the time with our rav..
even in the dead cold of winter..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I'm currently a 2004 CR-V owner. We've just traded it in for a 2006 Rav4 Sport (should be here by the weekend).

I've had nothing but problems with the CR-V. It's had 5 brakes jobs and, only after I wrote to Honda America did they acknowledge that it must not have been the brakes (defective rear hubs). And now we've go the dreaded PTTR that they seem to get after two years. Obviously, Honda has a much better track record than what I've experienced. I'm pretty sure we just got a lemon. Unfortunately, our Honda dealer's service department has not been a wonderful experience (the sales wasn't much better) so, we decided it was time to move on.

I will say, that the 2006 CR-V has fixed a lot of the issues we had with our 2004. They fixed the head rests in the back seat improving sight lines, added stereo controls to the steering wheel, etc. The flip up seats really don't give you as much cargo space as you think either. The shift column takes a while to get used to but, once you do, it becomes second nature.

We're looking forward to our Rav.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
flyingn said:
good post rab but would like to comment on a few..

RAV4 is ALL Japanese. 100% built and all components supplied by Japan... According to the window sticker...

We get 30 mpg on the highway all the time with our RAV..
even in the dead cold of winter..
Yea, I think I knew that about the 100% Japanese. This is one reason why I liked to get one before they start making them in Canada for 2008. The Mazda I think was 97 or 98% Jap.

As for the mileage, I'm not sure exactly what it is. Perhaps if I completely took it easy on the gas and drove almost an entire tank at like 60 MPG, then I might get the 28 MPG that it's rated for.
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top