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In town, it's usually very likely that I get between 12.5-15 L/100km or 15.6-18.8 MPG for my American RAV4 buddies, which seems horrible (I didn't buy a Tundra, but I might need to buy an Echo to offset fuel costs :p).

However, I'm currently driving from Kingston, ON to Cape Breton Island and decided to drive the posted speed limit (I mean I obviously do anyways). Normally I see about 10 L/100km or 23.5 MPG, which is meh, but I knew what I was getting when I got the V6. So far I'm noticing I'm getting 8.2 L/100km or 28.7 MPG.

Does anyone else notice a drastic difference between the two types of driving? Let me know what they are thanks!!
 

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I drive mostly highway and keep it at 55 mph. Getting 27 MPG but that is also with keeping the RPM below 2000 after a stop, driving like an old lady. If I drive in town maybe 23 MPG
 

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Ours gets around 22-23mpg no matter what it seems. It is mostly the around town errand mobile and sees little highway. On our all highway cross country drive we got around 23 as well. But it was loaded to the roof and had a large roof top cargo box.
 

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My mileage numbers are right in line with yours. Most of my driving is in town (short trips), and I average 16-17 MPG. The terrain is very flat. Weather is moderate, almost sub-tropical. On the highway, my best ever was 28.4 through gently rolling hills. Yeah, there's a huge difference for me.
 

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With my V6 RAV in town only driving (mostly short trips of less than 6 miles, mostly less than that) some traffic lights) I get between 11.6 (by far the worst) to about a more usual 14.5 mpg. Highway driving (about 1/3 straight line and Interstate and 2/3 mountain with about half of that very twisty) I get between 23.8 and 26.2 mpg. Quite a difference for me as well.
 

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In town I get 21-22 mpg, and on the highway anywhere between 26 and 28 mpg. I used to get 28-31 mpg on the highway, but I haven't seen that since I first replaced the stock tires. These days I average 24.5 mpg with a commute of about 45 miles to work (each way), mostly interstate with about 3 miles of steep hills.
 

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You all should find that mileage improves as the engine is broken-in. It is not wise to measure fuel consumption until you hit 8,000 to 10,000 miles. Just my experience.
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You all should find that mileage improves as the engine is broken-in. It is not wise to measure fuel consumption until you hit 8,000 to 10,000 miles. Just my experience.
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Would be tough to find a V6 that hasn't been broken in at this point...

But if you know of one let me know so I can buy it. :)
 

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I'm right in line with ravenuer: about 21 mpg in town and 28-29 highway. I just made a long trip towing a 1200 lb trailer. Keeping it in 4th gear, I got about 18 mpg. The RPM on this trip while towing was about 2750 at 65 mph.
 

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I'm usually around those numbers too

12 to 13.5L /100km in town sometimes higher when my foot is heavy
and around 9L/100 on the highway.

best i've done is while comming back from Cap Breton,NS to Montreal I went down to 8.4L/100km and my speed avreage was roughly 130km/h sightly over 2000 RPM

it usually get worst during the winter.
 

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Low 20s in town, 27-28 highway.
 

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I don't mean any offense to anyone when I say this, but I feel most of your numbers are very off from standard. Here is my argument:

My last fill up was 3 days ago at 14.8mpg (128 miles/8.63 gallons) or 19L/100km. This is the worst I have ever seen it so there's that, but I would argue the 3.5L Rav4 is not fuel efficient and that you are going to give prospective buyers a very rosy picture when the numbers I am seeing here are not the average but maybe a second or third standard deviation of 'city' gas mileage distribution. I think what would be more interesting to know than just fuel economy is what kind of driving conditions you all are driving in.. crucially, is it flat where you live and what is the population of where you live (and even average weather)?

I live in Portland, and my commute includes 3 miles of stop and go as well as 3 miles of highway in my 6 miles commute each way every day. Part of this is flat, part of it is in the hills, part of this is in city streets going a block or two at a time between lights, and part of this is highway conditions that are sometimes bumper to bumper and sometimes 50mph-60mph when traffic is flowing. The weather here is very temperate. I feel this is much more accurate of an indicator of efficiency than others who may not fight traffic or stop and go, who may not have hills and live where everything is flat, or where distances are much more metered and casual/smooth/little to no traffic to get to your destinations. These types of conditions in my mind are what the EPA also goes off of, very idealized.

I typically receive 15.5-16.5mpg or ~17L/100km with this half city/half urban highway commute. I typically fill up when I 1/4 tank of gas, and I always run the math because I'm a nerd about such things and want to get a feel for any changes (such as why my last fillup was much worse than average). I have never, ever in my time owning this vehicle seen this commute go above 18mpg (or any other only city driving). And even all highway mileage such as driving across Nevada switching off driving with my lady I have never seen it go above 24mpg. I've seen it get close, 24.8mpg and what not, but never above 25mpg always just below or well below (say 22-23mpg mixed travel towns/highways).

My tires are currently at 38-39psi, my mileage is just over 48k, I always fill with premium fuel, my oil is 0w-20 currently.

A quick look at Fuelly.com confirms that the fuel economy numbers stated in this thread here by others are very outside the standard and not close to what I and others receive with this vehicle in normal daily use. If anyone is reading this later and considering purchasing a V6 Rav4 this can be a huge disservice.

Here is the current Fuelly data from other V6 Rav4 owners-
Year Average combined MPG
2012 - 21.6
2011 - 19.3
2010 - 19.9
2009 - 20.3
2008 - 20.6

My overall average MPG according to my Rav4 computer over the last several thousand miles is 19.0mpg even. So this confirms within range.
 

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I'm on the other side of the river in Battle Ground, WA. The RAV is my wife's car but she pretty much just drives it to the grocery store and it's also used for our hiking excursions in the mountains or trips out to the coast. Not sure where suburban driving falls on the city/highway scale. Generally no traffic but lots of lights/stop signs and short trips where it doesn't always get up to temp and putting around 25/35mph and some 55mph zones. If mpg dipped into the teens I would think something is wrong. Always use 87, premium in a vehicle not tuned for it can actually reduce mileage slightly.
 

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Well, I live right across the river from you in Vancouver, so Hello, Neighbor! :)

Bought my 2012 RAV4 from the good folks at Beaverton Toyota and it is a terrific car. My in town mileage is not great and varies from around 17 to around 19 depending on conditions and how fast I drive / accelerate. I expected the in-town mileage not to be great, say around 18 or so and that's about what I get.

Once I get out on the road and can drive 60 mph in 5th gear OD, that's a whole 'nuther story. There, depending on terrain, I can get 25-28+ mpg. Best mileage I get is on a drive to Lincoln City or Newport, where I routinely get 28.3 mpg on the round trip. We got 25.6 average mpg on a recent 1200 mile trip down to Reno and back.

This can change considerably if I hit that ugly Portland traffic that requires 2 hours to get across town, however. I do all I can to avoid that and keep hoping that the highway folks in OR / PDX will put in a by-pass lane for those of us who want to get across Portland but not stop there. A number of the larger cities have these and they benefit both those passing through and those who live there because there are fewer cars plugging up the streets that are not by-pass lanes or roads. So far, though, no deal and we are reduced to timing our crossings to early morning or early evening to make the commute reasonable.

When I was shopping for a new / newer SUV, I looked at the 2017 RAVs but saw neither a 6-cyl nor a turbo option. Either would have sold the car on the spot. Fortunately, their used vehicle lot was more accommodating. :)

My older brother and his wife have a 2016 RAV4 and its 4-cylinder engine is marginal at best. I don't feel safe in a car that requires a long passing distance or a long time to get up to freeway speed. Because of this, I have a 220 hp minimum engine requirement. A puny engine usually gets better mileage but it is a trade-off I am not prepared to make. Buying a little more fuel is no biggie, since my annual driving amount is usually around 5-6k miles.
 

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If owners use the dash fuel mileage indicator that typically is in the area of 1-2 mpg optimistic, in my experience. My mileage is always determined by arithmetically dividing the number of miles driven since the last fill up by the number of gallons required to fill the tank.


The EPA mileage figures for the 4.3 RAV were inaccurate for many owners since the EPA methodology for determining mileage was flawed since it reportedly involved dyno testing without ordinary driving circumstances such as tire rolling and air resistances being included, for examples. Since then EPA methodology reportedly has been improved and so data is more accurate for later vehicles.
 

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I'm on the other side of the river in Battle Ground, WA. The RAV is my wife's car but she pretty much just drives it to the grocery store and it's also used for our hiking excursions in the mountains or trips out to the coast. Not sure where suburban driving falls on the city/highway scale. Generally no traffic but lots of lights/stop signs and short trips where it doesn't always get up to temp and putting around 25/35mph and some 55mph zones. If mpg dipped into the teens I would think something is wrong. Always use 87, premium in a vehicle not tuned for it can actually reduce mileage slightly.
I might try 87 octane fuel, I've just always had good luck with pinging and other aspects using premium fuel in my vehicles. I know other vehicles with this 2GR-FE engine require premium when they are used in other Toyota vehicles but I don't know if they use the same programming necessarily. It's probably not necessary overall. Although I believe the ECU in the Rav4 does advance timing slightly with premium fuel, they just don't require it or maybe don't take full advantage of it like other Toyota products do in this engine. Is it a worthwhile difference for the extra money though? Hard to say. I do climb the steeper hills of Portland everyday in my Rav4 so I would probably notice a difference if there is any. I'll give it a go on the next fill up and see if I can tell. Could be placebo butt dyno though.


Well, I live right across the river from you in Vancouver, so Hello, Neighbor! :)

Bought my 2012 RAV4 from the good folks at Beaverton Toyota and it is a terrific car. My in town mileage is not great and varies from around 17 to around 19 depending on conditions and how fast I drive / accelerate. I expected the in-town mileage not to be great, say around 18 or so and that's about what I get.

Once I get out on the road and can drive 60 mph in 5th gear OD, that's a whole 'nuther story. There, depending on terrain, I can get 25-28+ mpg. Best mileage I get is on a drive to Lincoln City or Newport, where I routinely get 28.3 mpg on the round trip. We got 25.6 average mpg on a recent 1200 mile trip down to Reno and back.

This can change considerably if I hit that ugly Portland traffic that requires 2 hours to get across town, however. I do all I can to avoid that and keep hoping that the highway folks in OR / PDX will put in a by-pass lane for those of us who want to get across Portland but not stop there. A number of the larger cities have these and they benefit both those passing through and those who live there because there are fewer cars plugging up the streets that are not by-pass lanes or roads. So far, though, no deal and we are reduced to timing our crossings to early morning or early evening to make the commute reasonable.

When I was shopping for a new / newer SUV, I looked at the 2017 RAVs but saw neither a 6-cyl nor a turbo option. Either would have sold the car on the spot. Fortunately, their used vehicle lot was more accommodating. :)

My older brother and his wife have a 2016 RAV4 and its 4-cylinder engine is marginal at best. I don't feel safe in a car that requires a long passing distance or a long time to get up to freeway speed. Because of this, I have a 220 hp minimum engine requirement. A puny engine usually gets better mileage but it is a trade-off I am not prepared to make. Buying a little more fuel is no biggie, since my annual driving amount is usually around 5-6k miles.
I was just in Vancouver Sunday as a matter of fact, so hello as well! I think 17-19mpg is more accurate of a city mpg in these V6's. I would be willing to bet that I get 15.5-16.5mpg because of the hills which keeps things in 3rd and sometimes 2nd gears the whole way up everyday. Like you noted Portland traffic is now easily on par with Seattle and other "big" cities with massive influx of people the last 10 years, it's always rush hour and everything is a work to get to where you are going. If it weren't for going on trips or hauling things then a Corolla would be a much better option for all the stop and go scenarios. Not the least of it being the heaviness of the Rav4 before you even compare smaller engine sizes and engine thirst.

Agreed with the other points also. I don't necessarily mind the fuel factor of my 3.5L because the torque it provides for moving up and down hills, passing people if needed, being able to get out into traffic and merge is big. If I were to buy a modern equivalent I would probably look into the Acura version of the CR-V since it had their 3.5L in the same size vehicle as our Rav4.

With this thread I just wanted to stress that this V6 isn't some fuel efficient subcompact, it's a 3,700lb trucklet and it takes a fair amount of gasoline all the same. I think if you are the type where you coast a lot and are gentle on the throttle because you aren't in a hurry to be places then the tall gearing rewards this because Toyota built it like a grocery getter. On the other hand if you're in a dense urban area then you're constantly stopping and starting and it doesn't do so well since it's heavy and the engine is large and the gearing is always trying to be low and slow, not quick and agile (which is what is needed more often than not).

If owners use the dash fuel mileage indicator that typically is in the area of 1-2 mpg optimistic, in my experience. My mileage is always determined by arithmetically dividing the number of miles driven since the last fill up by the number of gallons required to fill the tank.


The EPA mileage figures for the 4.3 RAV were inaccurate for many owners since the EPA methodology for determining mileage was flawed since it reportedly involved dyno testing without ordinary driving circumstances such as tire rolling and air resistances being included, for examples. Since then EPA methodology reportedly has been improved and so data is more accurate for later vehicles.
I agree, and I do the math this way as well by asking for a receipt from the attendant after a fill up and then reset the trip odometer for the next time. But in this case to my mind it only helps prove my argument that 19mpg in the city is optimistic, I'm not sure how others are getting so much higher than what was optimistic by itself unless their definition of city is to me more like suburban or even rural with a town kind of thing with long blocks and lots of open space, little or no traffic. I get below 17mpg and if we were to take my overall average mpg which the computer currently shows at 19.0mpg and subtract 1-2mpg for trim then we are right where my hard calculations are. The EPA on our V6 Rav4 say "up to" 19mpg city, I figured for 17mpg, and I get 15.5mpg-16.5mpg city but I'm also up and down hills so I find this accurate.

Good discussion :eek:
 

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Mine remains 19 - 20 in town and mid to upper 20's for all highway. A/C is almost always on but that will be used less since I moved 600 miles north. There's actually winter here unlike deep south TX. 87 octane only but top tier gas 100% of the time.
 

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@IEDesign

You & I are 'details nerd' and please take it in a good way :)

We shared the same idea that local environmental and other factors (right-foot twitches or left foot braking) heavily influence the gas mileage reported by individual users. I think southern Rav4s spend a lot less time getting up to operating temperature than those of us 'northerners'. Virtually every quick short trip of less than 5 miles operates in the cold fuel mapping zone - more gas burned. The law of physic applies for stop and go traffic. It takes considerable amount of gas to move inertial mass from rest to speed, stop and repeat.

With my OCD I've virtually spread-sheet tracked every drop of gas going into the tank since new. The lifetime gas mileage for my Rav4 in the southern metropolitan Ontario (0f-86f temperature band) is 18.9 mpg with 65% city/35% hwy, over 70,000 miles. For me short city trip with AC or using winter gas it can get to 15mpg (15L/100Km). Sustained highway trip at 75mph with AC usually gets me 23mpg (10.2L/100Km).

I'm not much of a jack-rabbit start/stop kind of driver. For my temperate climate locale I would say 15mpg - 23mpg with an lifetime average of 19mpg on my V6. It can be a lot worse if I drive enthusiastically . . .

As for your premium gas use, I did an experiment on a long 1,200 miles highway trip using premium instead of regular unleaded gas I normally used. First off, premium gas around here has no ethanol so you've up to 10% more usable gas/energy content compared to the regular gas (10% ethanol). Secondly, our V6 may not be officially programmed for the extra octane in premium as in RX350 using the same 2GR-FE. However, under load (heavy content or hilly roads) with premium gas I found the transmission down-shift less frequently than with regular unleaded gas. I speculate pinging occurs with regular gas more frequently than with premium gas. I do not use premium gas normally for short trips because it's likely running rich already when not reaching operating temperature. For extended long trip with full passenger or cargo load over less than flat terrain, I think using premium gas is an idea worth considering. You may want to compare data for the same long highway trips, one with premium gas and one using regular gas. Judge the trip on transmission gear hunting as well as gas mileage to validate.

Okay, enough rambling from this nerd . . . . :)
 
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