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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,

I would like to know how long before you need to have your brakes lubed ???

I have a 2019 Rav4 with 12500km or 7500miles.
I don't feel any resistance when applying the brakes nor while driving.
I am wondering if I should get it checked out from the dealer, just for precaution.

Today I did my second oil change myself and found that the oil was darker (dirtier) than when I did the first oil change, which I find strange.

Anyway, thanks for your input.
 

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If you go onto the dealership web site plug in your vehicle details, if will give you your maintenance schedule either follow that or what some people do is a break service themselves once a year. Lots of videos on line about brake servicing yourself save lots $$$$, it not that complicated, just follow the steps you will be fine.
 

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You should have the brakes serviced once a year.
*pads measured for remaining thickness
*rotors measure for remaining thickness
*sandpaper to the rotor surface and pad surface to remove any glazing
*caliper slide pins cleaned and relubed! This is a critical aspect of the brake service.
*
clean/relube other points that require lube: pad hanger, pad backing.
 

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I’ve never heard of lubing the brakes, why would anyone do that? Do you mean change the brake fluid?

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You grease the caliper pins, the back of the pads. You try to avoid any grease or oil on the rotor or pad friction surface, cause that's going to make it hard to stop.
 

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If you live in salt use area like me in Quebec, you should have your brakes serviced after every winter, Slide pins are not the real problem , its rust built up under the shims, rust swells ( a bit like ice swells ) this will squeeze the pads in the calipers and make them hard to retract when you release the brake pedal , they will stick enough to cause premature and uneven pad wear, I did my first brake after the first winter that I owned it and already had some rust built up under the shims. You have to remove the rust ( sand paper works ) and then apply a special lub ( its like a copper base lub ) .
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What I understand after reading the above post :
Best to have the Brakes serviced once per year.

I bought the car new on April 26, 2019 and NEVER any service done except two (2) oil changes which I've did myself. Hopefully no long term damage because I neglected to have the brakes serviced. Car presently has 12500 km or 7500 miles. Because of Covid car is mostly in the garage.

Thanks guys.
 

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I honestly have never disassembled brakes to lube the calipers unless I'm doing the brakes. And I live where they salt the roads. There is an actual Toyota caliper lube. Part # 08887-80609.
I though Part # 08887-01206 is for slide pin (especially there is a rubber/plastic ring), piston rubber etc. Part # 08887-80609 is for metal to metal only, such as shims , pad edges.
 

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I though Part # 08887-01206 is for slide pin (especially there is a rubber/plastic ring), piston rubber etc. Part # 08887-80609 is for metal to metal only, such as shims , pad edges.
I think that either will work. I just posted what I would use. I have read that the 08887-80609 will last longer which is probably why it is pricier. It also appears that it is able to withstand higher temperatures.

Honestly thinking the rubber grease is more of an O-Ring lube.
 

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I have never serviced brakes between replacements. (Probably average around 3 years)

The caliper pins are sealed with rubber boots. (Which I replace every time I’ve done brakes). Once a year seems excessive. But if paying for more servicing makes you feel better that’s up to each person.
 

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I have never serviced brakes between replacements. (Probably average around 3 years)

The caliper pins are sealed with rubber boots. (Which I replace every time I’ve done brakes). Once a year seems excessive. But if paying for more servicing makes you feel better that’s up to each person.
Yes you bring up a great point does servicing your brakes between replacements actually prolong the life of the pads, or is it a make work project. Or something we have just jumped onto the bandwagon because the dealers created this service item in order to bring our vehicles in for service my often????
 

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Bakes being a safety system is why dealers are so on it about them, as a former mechanic I kind of agree but I'm more of the thinking yearly inspection is fine and service if the inspection shows something.
 

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If you live in an area that salt the roads in winter, you NEED a brake service every spring.
I’m not telling people not to have maintenance done if they want, but there’s plenty of salt around here and I’m all for preventative maintenance to reduce/eliminate bigger problems down the road. All I’m saying in all the years I’ve been in New England it’s never been a problem. Put the correct lube where there should be and antiseize and I’ve never had a problem going the life of the brakes. I’ve been doing my own brake work for my (and helping friends/family) vehicles for the last 15+ years. I replace all the caliper hardware every time. The stuff the pads slide on and rubber for the pins. It all looks good it’s all stainless anyways but it’s so cheap it’s easier just to replace it all.
 

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Bakes being a safety system is why dealers are so on it about them, as a former mechanic I kind of agree but I'm more of the thinking yearly inspection is fine and service if the inspection shows something.
Yea a yearly inspection makes a lot more sense than complete disassembly and reassembly. If you see something like a torn boot then yea it’s going to be a good idea to take it apart at that point. These inspections are supposed to happen every 5,000 miles as part of your maintenance.
 

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The problem is that the calipers are made of steel, steel rust and push up on the stainless sliders and at one point put enough pressure on the end of the pads where they touch the pads that the pads have to be removed with a large screwdriver and hammer. You have to remove the stainless sliders and clean the rust built up under there. , rear wheels are worst as the front wheels lift up the dirt and salt and shoot them at the back wheels.I was a mechanic for 10 yrs and a service manager for 30 yrs , seen lots of premature brake wear. When the car is new ( i mean in the first year ) the factory plating on the calipers prevent the rust ( or most of it ) but after that its like DO YOUR BRAKE SERVICE EVERY SPRING ) If you have to pay to get it done , then its a question of how much you save by not doing it versus the cost of premature brake wear..
 

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Sweet info, thanks guys for this. Anyone got a handy part# list they got saved for brake servicing (pads, rotors, shims etc.) in addition to what was posted above. Save some trouble finding it all.
 

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So, to address the OP, it depends upon where you live and how many miles you drive. I live in California and drive low miles per year. I never touch my brakes for the life of the pads, but my vehicle never sees snow or salt. Lately, it rarely even sees rain, so there is little to no rust for the life of the vehicle. If I lived where I used snow tires, changing them every spring would be a good time for a brake inspection. Once the tires are off, it’s easy to inspect the brakes and make sure everything slides OK.
 
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