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Did my plugs this weekend. To avoid breaking the coil connectors I warmed them with air dryer. Overall wasn't too bad just took my time. I highly recommend using torque wrench. I also cleaned the TB and replaced the PCV.
 

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I just replaced my plugs, took a couple hours, and I might add that I had to use two 3” extensions (3/8 drive) to get to the back plugs, because they are too close to the firewall to use a single 6” with the plug socket on.
Otherwise the OP write-up was a huge help!
 

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Great how to!
I have two observations, based on my experience...

1. Don't use anti-seize on the modern chrome/nickel plated plugs, especially when installed in aluminum heads! It will cook and make them harder to remove later, hinder the proper heat transfer, plus you can easily tighten them too much.
See what NGK has to say about that:
"NGK spark plugs feature what is known as trivalent plating. This silver- or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without the use of anti-seize. NGK tech support has received a number of tech calls from installers who have over-tightened spark plugs because of the use of anti-seize. Anti-seize compound can act as a lubricant altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage."

2. If you go through the trouble of removing the intake plenum, might as well replace the rear coils. If there's enough money, all injectors should be replaced same time with the spark plugs. On my older V6 cars I learned that, at or over 100K miles, is prudent to do that too.
 
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