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Did my plugs this weekend. To avoid breaking the coil connectors I warmed them with air dryer. Overall wasn't too bad just took my time. I highly recommend using torque wrench. I also cleaned the TB and replaced the PCV.
 

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I just replaced my plugs, took a couple hours, and I might add that I had to use two 3” extensions (3/8 drive) to get to the back plugs, because they are too close to the firewall to use a single 6” with the plug socket on.
Otherwise the OP write-up was a huge help!
 

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Great how to!
I have two observations, based on my experience...

1. Don't use anti-seize on the modern chrome/nickel plated plugs, especially when installed in aluminum heads! It will cook and make them harder to remove later, hinder the proper heat transfer, plus you can easily tighten them too much.
See what NGK has to say about that:
"NGK spark plugs feature what is known as trivalent plating. This silver- or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without the use of anti-seize. NGK tech support has received a number of tech calls from installers who have over-tightened spark plugs because of the use of anti-seize. Anti-seize compound can act as a lubricant altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage."

2. If you go through the trouble of removing the intake plenum, might as well replace the rear coils. If there's enough money, all injectors should be replaced same time with the spark plugs. On my older V6 cars I learned that, at or over 100K miles, is prudent to do that too.
 

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I did this job on a few V6 DOHC transversal engines, and is never easy.
The only observation that I have is this: Do NOT use any kind of antiseize on the threads. The playing of the threads is the antiseize. No plug manufacturer recommends that and OE doesn't use it either.
Only the old school plugs with black threads were requiring antiseize.
 

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After I changed my plugs, I've noticed a slight reduction in my fuel economy... but I'm not 100% sure if this is related. Anyone have issues with less MPG after doing your own plugs?
 

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Did you connect all the vacuum hoses correctly? Are they tight? Are the intake plenum gaskets installed correctly? Personally, when I change the spark plugs I also change the gaskets, because that rubber it was there, compressed, for like 8-10 years.

Sucking in un-metered air can reduce mpg.
A code reader that can read live parameters would help - look at the long term fuel trims, if they are positive, it means that the O2 sensors read lean burning and the PCM compensate. If the air leak is big enough (that the trims are above a limit) it triggers a CEL code.

Those are the 6 gaskets that I talking about:
 

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Just want to let everyone know that I was able to replace all 3 of the rear ignition coils on a 2007 V6 without removing the intake plenum. Actually there is pretty of room to work on comparing to a sienna or camry. It also helps that 2 of the 3 bitter plug connection locks just snap off as soon as i put pressure on it. The other one you can first take off the coil from the engine and then unplug it. (I believe all 3 plug connectors can be taken off the same way) There are plenty of pictures on the other previous posts so there is no problem doing it blind. Or you can take some pictures with a cell phone first. I didn’t replace the spark plugs because I only had a engine code for coils but I see no reason not be able to do it the same way. So give it a try at least.
 

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After I changed my plugs, I've noticed a slight reduction in my fuel economy... but I'm not 100% sure if this is related. Anyone have issues with less MPG after doing your own plugs?
I did notice abot 3-4 mpg less after the change, but also went from all season Michelins to Blizzaks of the same size. I thought that might have been the reason.
I have taken a specific route from MI to IA and predictably knew what I should get for mileage (25.5-26) and I dropped down to 22-23 first couple tanks. After about 1000 miles, it was back to normal and has been since for the last 7000 mi.
 
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