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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As we slide into winter and the MPGs start to drop, I have a month's-worth of November driving experience to help keep the MPGs up. In November, I covered 2,386 miles, and over the 5 fill ups in the month, I was able to average 40.8mpg. Here are some tips I found to minimize your MPG drop in addition to the standard hybrid techniques of pulse and glide, not gunning it at red lights, recognizing early and coasting to a stop, keeping speeds in check on the Interstate (if practical), etc.:

- Use ECO mode. This will help cut down on jack rabbit starts but it will also put your heater in ECO mode so it will (presumably) have less draw on the ICE. If you're worried about lack of power in ECO mode, don't be; you still have plenty of power if you put your foot down.

- Minimize use of the heater fan. This might be the biggest item to save gas. What I found that works well to keep the cabin warm is to turn on the fan to the lowest setting, set the temperature to 70 or 75, and then turn the fan off. Make sure the recirc is NOT turned on so you have air flow into the cabin. You can direct the air how you want (the defrost/floor combo or straight defrost works best for me), but I found, at least at any speed above 40mph, I have enough warm air coming into the cabin to keep things warm. EDIT: Pop your moon roof up and that will allow more warm airflow through the cabin. It will also help prevent your windows fogging up on the inside when it's really cold as your exhaled breath will be whisked out through the moon roof.

- Speaking of warmth, use the heated steering wheel and seat heaters (if equipped) to help keep you warm. That will draw power from the battery and not the ICE.

- Use pure, ethanol-free gas if it's a viable option. Pure gas is only $.05/gallon more than 10% ethanol gas here which is a 1.8% increase in price for an 8.9% increase in MPGs, so it makes sense economically for me.

- Minimize weight in your vehicle. If you don't need it in your vehicle, get rid of it.

- If you don't need snow tires, use your stock tires if you can get away with it. I've been through 5 or 6 snow storms since I purchased my Rav4H, and I found the stock Dunlops that came with the car and the AWD system have been able to handle everything I've encountered.

EDIT:

- Speaking of tires, keep an eye on your tire pressures. Make sure they're at least at the recommended setting if not a bit higher. If you set your pressure in a heated garage, remember to take into account the drop in temperature the moment you leave. In other words, set it higher to account for the drop when you head out into the cold.

These are things that have worked for me. My overall average since purchase is a little over 42mpg, but I've only seen a drop to 40.8mpg since the cold weather has set in...
 

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Though about the premium gas here, but unfortunately, in my area the premium gas with no ethanol is 15% pricier.

I was doing 41mpg during summer, was down to about 27mpg! Just changing how ''warm'' the cabin is, I've been back to 37mpg over the last 2 tanks. I don't use eco mode, but I use the eco heat/cool.

I put the heat at 65 while city driving and turn it up on highway since the ICE is working anyway. It's been working wonders for me so far.
 

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Very good advice. I have just one quibble though: All the energy in a non-EV is ultimately derived from the ICE.

Speaking of warmth, use the heated steering wheel and seat heaters (if equipped) to help keep you warm. That will draw power from the battery and not the ICE.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
All the energy in a non-EV is ultimately derived from the ICE
Sure, I realize we're not in a perpetual energy machine, but using the heated steering wheel and seat heaters will lessen the amount of gas used vs. using the heater over the long term. ;)
 

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I've had my XSE for a week. Drove 140 miles home from the dealership; 44 mpg to start, but 36 by the time I got home -- snowing, and AWD kicking in frequently on the stock Michelin Primacy A/S tires. Also, it was a 2-lane highway and I had to pass several semis at one point; LOVELY to have plenty of power for that, but it did hit fuel economy substantially. Since I'm in western Montana and snow tires go on tomorrow, I will sadly not know our fuel-economy potential for months.

* The XSE replaced a 2002 Acura RSX with 220K miles. The Rav is my first car with AWD, with more than 2 doors, and without a stick shift. (I'm averaging 2 new cars per millennium right now, lol). I LOVE MY NEW RAV4H!!! had a choice between this fully-loaded XSE and a Limited, and after test-driving both, the XSE was the clear choice...I've always liked my cars on the sporty side. And HUGE thanks to all the knowledge on this forum; I lurked for weeks before buying.
 

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When I was familiarizing myself with the car (jack points, removing the spare, operating the jack etc.) everything surprisingly felt 'light'.

Out of all the content in OP's post, the biggest wtf was the pulse and glide. Looked up a few vids on youtube, and I now have a new game to play driving lol. Hybrid really is a different style that reduces aggressive habits.
 

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Removing the spare could yield some fuel savings over the course of driving hundreds of thousands of miles. It’s not a trivial amount of weight.

the trade off is being stranded if you suffer a flat tire. Unless you’re sporting run flats, I would leave the spare in.
 

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Removing the spare could yield some fuel savings over the course of driving hundreds of thousands of miles. It’s not a trivial amount of weight.

the trade off is being stranded if you suffer a flat tire. Unless you’re sporting run flats, I would leave the spare in.
Unless you're only a city/burban driver with CAA/AAA at your fingertips, and knowing the nearest costco tire centre on your commute from your 8-4 job closes @ 8:30pm - confidently save yourself the est. 12lb and become what you were born to be, a #hypermiler :poop:
 

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If you read the manual, the engine will run for longer in cold temps to stay at operating temp. Not a problem in most of Australia. I get 6l/100k (39 US MPG) irrespective of type of driving or weather. 2019 RAV4 CRUISER AWD Hybrid on E10 fuel.
 

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Though about the premium gas here, but unfortunately, in my area the premium gas with no ethanol is 15% pricier.

I was doing 41mpg during summer, was down to about 27mpg! Just changing how ''warm'' the cabin is, I've been back to 37mpg over the last 2 tanks. I don't use eco mode, but I use the eco heat/cool.

I put the heat at 65 while city driving and turn it up on highway since the ICE is working anyway. It's been working wonders for me so far.
I believe I killed my previous car (2012 Murano) by using cheap fuel - catalytic converter failure

I don’t want to make same mistake with the Rav4.
I drive on average 20 000 km annually

89 Octane - mid grade - in BC is on average $0.1 more expensive than reg 87 Octane.
with my average mpg being 5.4L/100km, that translates to an extra $4 per tank.
3 tanks per month = $12 monthly for better quality fuel !
No brainer if you ask me.
 

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I believe your Murano was killed by Nissan engineering. 87 octane fuel is fine for vehicles designed for it. The cost is negligible, that’s for sure. But the base gasoline is the same in all three tanks just different amounts additives are mixed with higher octane fuels. If you’re really worried about your fuel, eliminate the ethanol all together.
 

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US Octane ratings are different to rest of world. E10 fuel here is 94 Octane and is recommended by Toyota. I have been using it for years in multiple cars with nil issues. Australian Ethanol comes from sugar cane, US Ethanol from corn mainly - source should not matter.
 

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Came here looking for help before heading to the dealership. I know that cold weather affects fuel efficiency, but this is just crazy...

Previously, I was a Prius owner for 5 years so knowing "how to drive a Hybrid" and all that isn't an issue. That car would see an drop of about 0.8L/100km in efficiency over winter (winter tires on) in Canada. That equates to a drop of about 4mpg in winter compared to summer.

Now, I have an XSE with 1000km on it and brand new winter tires (Toyo from dealer). The last couple of weeks I've noticed the fuel efficiency plummit to absurd levels where I'm averaging about 11L/100km (21mpg). A colleague at work in the same city is still doing about 36mpg in the same conditions. I can't imagine any combination of hacking how I heat the cabin or ultra gradually accelerate will make up the difference of 15mpg.

Even my previous best (31mpg) from when the weather was much warmer was still far below what you'd expect.

Thoughts???
 

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Came here looking for help before heading to the dealership. I know that cold weather affects fuel efficiency, but this is just crazy...

Previously, I was a Prius owner for 5 years so knowing "how to drive a Hybrid" and all that isn't an issue. That car would see an drop of about 0.8L/100km in efficiency over winter (winter tires on) in Canada. That equates to a drop of about 4mpg in winter compared to summer.

Now, I have an XSE with 1000km on it and brand new winter tires (Toyo from dealer). The last couple of weeks I've noticed the fuel efficiency plummit to absurd levels where I'm averaging about 11L/100km (21mpg). A colleague at work in the same city is still doing about 36mpg in the same conditions. I can't imagine any combination of hacking how I heat the cabin or ultra gradually accelerate will make up the difference of 15mpg.

Even my previous best (31mpg) from when the weather was much warmer was still far below what you'd expect.

Thoughts???
so, to confirm: you’re not even getting 400km per tank ?
 

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US Octane ratings are different to rest of world. E10 fuel here is 94 Octane and is recommended by Toyota. I have been using it for years in multiple cars with nil issues. Australian Ethanol comes from sugar cane, US - source should not matter. I get 6L / 100km - almost 1,000 km per tank.
 

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so, to confirm: you’re not even getting 400km per tank ?
Given I've only 1000km on the vehicle and have only noticed this dramatic drop in efficiency the last 150km or so, no I haven't had a chance to a longer term breakdown. The last ~150km though have been registering at 10-12L/100km with gentle mostly city driving.
 

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As we slide into winter and the MPGs start to drop, I have a month's-worth of November driving experience to help keep the MPGs up. In November, I covered 2,386 miles, and over the 5 fill ups in the month, I was able to average 40.8mpg. Here are some tips I found to minimize your MPG drop in addition to the standard hybrid techniques of pulse and glide, not gunning it at red lights, recognizing early and coasting to a stop, keeping speeds in check on the Interstate (if practical), etc.:

- Use ECO mode. This will help cut down on jack rabbit starts but it will also put your heater in ECO mode so it will (presumably) have less draw on the ICE. If you're worried about lack of power in ECO mode, don't be; you still have plenty of power if you put your foot down.

- Minimize use of the heater fan. This might be the biggest item to save gas. What I found that works well to keep the cabin warm is to turn on the fan to the lowest setting, set the temperature to 70 or 75, and then turn the fan off. Make sure the recirc is NOT turned on so you have air flow into the cabin. You can direct the air how you want (the defrost/floor combo or straight defrost works best for me), but I found, at least at any speed above 40mph, I have enough warm air coming into the cabin to keep things warm.

- Speaking of warmth, use the heated steering wheel and seat heaters (if equipped) to help keep you warm. That will draw power from the battery and not the ICE.

- Use pure, ethanol-free gas if it's a viable option. Pure gas is only $.05/gallon more than 10% ethanol gas here which is a 1.8% increase in price for an 8.9% increase in MPGs, so it makes sense economically for me.

- Minimize weight in your vehicle. If you don't need it in your vehicle, get rid of it.

- If you don't need snow tires, use your stock tires if you can get away with it. I've been through 5 or 6 snow storms since I purchased my Rav4H, and I found the stock Dunlops that came with the car and the AWD system have been able to handle everything I've encountered.

EDIT:

- Speaking of tires, keep an eye on your tire pressures. Make sure they're at least at the recommended setting if not a bit higher. If you set your pressure in a heated garage, remember to take into account the drop in temperature the moment you leave. In other words, set it higher to account for the drop when you head out into the cold.

These are things that have worked for me. My overall average since purchase is a little over 42mpg, but I've only seen a drop to 40.8mpg since the cold weather has set in...
Try some alcohol free fuel. It has more energy
 
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