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'19 Rav4 XLE Hybrid--Magnetic Gray Metallic
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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to learn how to rotate my tires at home and avoid having to waste time by taking the car to a shop to have this done.

How do you rotate your Rav4 tires at home? I currently have a 3 ton jack and x2 jack stands. I found a video on youtube of someone rotating the tires on the Rav4 but this method involves lifting the entire car in the air using 4 jack stands. I'd like to avoid this, if possible.


Since the owners manual states the tires should be rotated directional (back left tire gets moved to left front, and right back tire gets moved to right front), I'd like to find a safe method of lifting just one side of the car at a time, and rotating the two tires, and then moving onto the other side.

Does anyone have a good youtube video I could use as reference?

Thank you in advance!
 

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Waiting for a XLE Hybride 2020
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If your tires are directional, then you can only rotate them front/back (not left/right).
Otherwise, you can use your spare wheel as a buffer and do a little sliding block puzzle game :)
 

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I just use my roller jack. I love that the lift point for front and rear are on frame members in the middle. Makes it easy.

Decide on your rotation method (which tire goes where). Then I use the spare in place of the first removed tire and rotate them around and then the final move is to pull the spare and put the last tire there. Take me about 15 minutes or so. Remember to loosen the lugs before you put the vehicle in the air. And make sure to chock the wheels on the opposite side of work; opposite axle.

You should find a safe/proper spot for a jack stand while you do each corner but I dont do this myself as I am not under the car.

I am also not sure those are proper spots for jack stands in the video but I have not had to worry about getting the whole thing in the air at one time.
 

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Same here, i used jack and jack stands to do my RAV's tire rotation, plus inside wheel cleaning too while it is out. Lug nuts torqued at 76 lb-ft.

 

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What I have done in the past was to invest in another scissor jack. The one I found at Walmart awhile back was a hydraulic scissor jack. If it wasn't so heavy I would prefer it to the manual screw type that come with the car.

So basically, you use the OEM jack to lift either the front or the rear and then use the new one to raise the opposite end. Obviously, all on the same side of the car. At this point, the whole side on the car is off the ground. Make sure you use wheel chock(s).

You order an extra OEM jack but I didn't realize how expensive they are:
 

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I usually do it myself but since I had it in for my first oil change I had Toyota do it. I asked if they did anything fancy, like cross rotation, they said no, just front to back. This being said, I will probably do my next rotation so I can use my hydraulic scissor jack. I haven't used in in a while since my 2009 BMW X3 never needed it's tires rotated. Yep, I had that same look on my face when I asked and was told that it never needed a rotation. Over 32K on the original tires and all 4 had the same wear. Too bad a small fender bender totaled the car.
 

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I block/chalk the opposite wheels.
I took a 4x4 and cut a groove so it slides around the pinch welds and also sits into the top of the jack.
Find the jack point below the front door, jack and both the front and rear wheel will come off the ground.
I have some 24” cut 4x4’s I use as cribbing To make a stable safe base, I don’t trust or like jack stands (JMO).
Swap front to rear, let her down, torque, go to the other side and repeat.
 

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I just had to share some images of the jack I was talking about. I can't seem to find it online anywhere but I didn't look too hard.

As you can see, the hydraulic piston has holes so it's got a built-in jack stand feature.

It's great, you pump it up and it rises straight up just like the OEM jack; unlike floor jacks which move off center when raised. When you're done, you open the valve, and down it comes, done.

155172
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If anyone wants to do a deeper dive, here is a closer image of the UPC

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I don't remember paying that much for it either. I want to say $20 or $30 at Walmart.

UPDATE
I found an equivalent but it's not cheap especially the shipping



and an alternative to Toyota's price for a standard scissor jack:

 
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I would be tempted to lift up the front of the vehicle, place the two Jack's stands at their locations under the rocket panels behind the front wheels, then raise the rear of the vehicle with the jack under the rear cross member just enough to get the rear tires a half inch off the ground. Now all 4 wheels are off the ground, and the vehicle should still be reasonably stable. Dont get under the vehicle.

Caveat: I would NOT do this with the factory jack. In fact, I probably would only do it with a higher-quality jack that is rigid enough to keep the back end from wobbling and falling sideways. I am admittedly spoiled by my jack that lifts 3-24" and weighs over 100lb :p .

Good luck!
 

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🇨🇦 2020 RAV4 XLE Hybrid - Super White
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seems like we got a 2 camp scenario forming:

1) front to back
2) cross rotation

Assuming your tires are not directional and just the basic OEM's, is there any right or wrong here doing either?
 

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seems like we got a 2 camp scenario forming:

1) front to back
2) cross rotation

Assuming your tires are not directional and just the basic OEM's, is there any right or wrong here doing either?
Do a Google search. There are many discussions as to the pros and cons for both regarding non-directional tires including the infamous 5 tire rotation but you gotta have a full size spare for that to work.

Here's a good one which includes a whole bunch of other rotation methods:

 

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Do a Google search. There are many discussions as to the pros and cons for both regarding non-directional tires including the infamous 5 tire rotation but you gotta have a full size spare for that to work.

Here's a good one which includes a whole bunch of other rotation methods:

Yeah did that a while back, personally I’m following the manual for my needs.

Just fleshing out other users thoughts that feel strongly to their method to enrich this thread with quality content for anyone else using advanced search in the future 🍻
 

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I’m old school in that I send the back tires to the front on the same side, and the front tires cross over to the opposite rear (modified X). Before I had snow tires for both rides, I would use a jackstand under the suspension on a regular vehicle. On my 2WD RAV, there’s a centre jack point for the rear, and I’d jack up with that and plant two jackstands, leaving the rear fully in the air, then jack the front side as needed. Never bothered putting the spare in rotation, but likely should have...

Now with snows I mark where the tire is to go when I put it back on (TO LF= to left front) so I get a proper rotation with the changeover.
 

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If your tires are directional, then you can only rotate them front/back (not left/right).
Otherwise, you can use your spare wheel as a buffer and do a little sliding block puzzle game :)
I used the spare for a few years to do that. I sucked it up and eventually got 2 more jack stands to have 4 To get the whole car up.

I’m surprised how many are suggesting two jack stands for the front/rear and only a hydraulic jack for the other side. I’d be super pissed With myself if the jack failed and the car lowered down on it with no wheels installed. Hydraulic Jacks are meant to lift, not hold a sustained weight on them.
 

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Hydraulic Jacks are meant to lift, not hold a sustained weight on them.
If the hydraulic jack can’t hold the vehicle up long enough to take one wheel off and put another on, it should be replaced. It likely doesn’t have good enough seals to properly lift the vehicle anyway, which would be apparent when trying to jack it up. Keep it in good condition and it’s fine. It’s not like anyone is recommending to put any part of their body under the vehicle when supported only by the jack, that would be asking for trouble.
 

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I’m just following the proper precautions. You know those instructions on the sticker affixed to the jack? I can’t recommend to a complete stranger they trust their hydraulic jack to support their vehicle for any period of time and be stable enough when doing any maintenance work on it regardless if they’re under it or not.

I cringe at the thought of my wife finding me standing in the garage with our $30k vehicle resting on the floor with no wheels on it, all because I wanted save $20-30 with a DIY tire rotation XD... her coworkers finding out and asking who made the jack and her saying, I don’t know, we got it as this Harbor something store XD XD
 

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You mean the lawyer sticker? Sounds like the note from Toyota in the manual telling owners to remove the trailer hitch when it’s not in use - at 2-4 hours for installation of the factory unit, that would be awfully inconvenient!

Like I said, if it can’t hold the vehicle long enough to R&R the wheel, it also can’t hold it long enough to properly position a jackstand and should be tossed.

Speaking of Harbor Freight, they have recalled the replacement 3T jackstands, following the previous recall on the 3T and 6T stands. These are the “Pittsburgh “ models IIRC.

My trolley jack is still in great shape and holds pressure amazingly well, considering that it’s of the type from Harbor Freight, and is over 20 years old (bought from Canadian Tire).
 
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